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Past Posts > December/January Group Classics Nominations

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message 1: by Leslie (new)

Leslie | 15985 comments It is time for nominations on which classic we should read in December & January.

A reminder on the procedure: anyone can nominate a book. Nominations need to be seconded by another member to qualify for the poll. Nominations will remain open for 10 days (until Nov. 18) or until there are six seconded books, whichever comes first.

I have shortened the nominations period as I am late getting this set up -- sorry about that!


message 2: by Jenny (last edited Nov 08, 2014 02:46PM) (new)

Jenny (jeoblivion) | 4869 comments I would like to nominate Fathers and Sons by Ivan Turgenev which I just bought.

(I was going to nominate "The Kreutzer Sonata" by Tolstoy, but it being a novella it may be too short to really qualify? Do we have a policy for this? Just for future reference)

And can you tell I believe winter belongs to all things Russian? LOL


message 3: by Alannah (new)

Alannah Clarke (alannahclarke) | 11715 comments Mod
Jenny wrote: "I would like to nominate Fathers and Sons by Ivan Turgenev instead which I just bought.

(I was going to nominate "The Kreutzer Sonata" by Tolstoy, but it being a novella it may be t..."


I second this as I would love to try Russian literature and a group read is the best place to start.


message 4: by Diane S ☔ (last edited Nov 08, 2014 02:30PM) (new)


message 5: by Dhanaraj (new)

Dhanaraj Rajan | 2962 comments Diane S. wrote: "I nominate Death Comes for the Archbishopby Willa Cather"

I second it. I would love to read it again.


message 6: by Elisa (new)

Elisa | 206 comments I would like to nominate Vanity Fair by William Makepeace Thackeray


message 7: by Leslie (new)

Leslie | 15985 comments Oh, those all sound good to me! Especially Fathers and Sons, as I haven't read it yet...


message 8: by Greg (new)

Greg | 7480 comments Mod
They all sound good to me too! Fathers and Sons is the only one of the three I've read, but it was extremely good. The other two have been on my mental to-read list for a while. I'm considering whether I even want to nominate something else with the choices so good already.


message 9: by Evelyn (new)

Evelyn | 1410 comments I would like to nominate A Handful of Dust by Evelyn Waugh


message 10: by B the BookAddict (new)

B the BookAddict (bthebookaddict) | 8315 comments Elisa wrote: "I would like to nominate Vanity Fair by William Makepeace Thackeray"

I'll second Vanity Fair by William Makepeace Thackeray and hope I can find a copy with 'readable' (as in normal size) print by then.


message 11: by Bionic Jean (new)

Bionic Jean (bionicjean) I read it on Kindle last year. Think it was free.


message 12: by LauraT (new)

LauraT (laurata) | 13210 comments Mod
How will I be able to choose???
I second A Handful of Dust: it's high time I read Evelyn Waugh


message 13: by Chrissie (new)

Chrissie I would like to nominate Owls Do Cry, a New Zealand classic.


message 14: by Greg (new)

Greg | 7480 comments Mod
Chrissie, I provide my enthusiastic second for Owls Do Cry! I was thinking about nominating Moby-Dick; or, The Whale since I greatly enjoyed both Bartleby, the Scrivener and Billy Budd, Sailor. But Melville can wait! I've read some of Janet Frame's poetry, and I'd love to read some of her fiction or memoirs.

I second Owls Do Cry.


message 15: by Greg (new)

Greg | 7480 comments Mod
LauraT wrote: "How will I be able to choose???
I second A Handful of Dust: it's high time I read Evelyn Waugh"


Laura, I liked Brideshead Revisited; so I'd be interested in A Handful of Dust too. So many excellent choices this time around!


message 16: by Gail (new)

Gail (appleshoelace) Ian wrote: "I don't know if this is considered a classic but I'd like to nominate The Counterfeiters by Gide."

If it is considered by the group as a classic I'll second it. It was taught as a classic when I was at uni, and Wikipedia says it 'is now generally counted among the Western Canon of literature'. I've wanted to read it for a while.


message 17: by Greg (new)

Greg | 7480 comments Mod
Gail, just my two cents but I'd definitely consider André Gide to be a "classic" author.


Terry ~ Huntress of Erudition | 553 comments I would like to nominate Christmas Holiday by Somerset Maugham.

http://www.goodreads.com/bookshow/397...


message 19: by Jenny (new)

Jenny (jeoblivion) | 4869 comments Oh boy, this is going to be a tough one. Really want to read my nomination obviously but also would love to dip a toe back into Gide and definitely will be reading Owls do Cry, since I just got it from the library last weel.


message 20: by Chrissie (new)

Chrissie Gosh there are some great books here.... Thanks for seconding Owls Do Cry!


message 21: by Greg (new)

Greg | 7480 comments Mod
Thanks for nominating it! :)


message 22: by Chrissie (new)

Chrissie Greg, now we have to hope that others vote for Owls Do Cry! I am interested b/c it is beautifully written (according to many), set in New Zealand, has psychological themes and clearly draws the reader into the character's world. We have to cross our fingers and hold our thumbs.


message 23: by Bionic Jean (new)

Bionic Jean (bionicjean) Gone on my TBR shelf whether it wins or not ...


message 24: by Diane S ☔ (new)

Diane S ☔ Has been on mine for a while.


message 25: by Julia (last edited Nov 10, 2014 05:16AM) (new)

Julia (juliastrimer) Chrissie wrote: "Greg, now we have to hope that others vote for Owls Do Cry! I am interested b/c it is beautifully written (according to many), set in New Zealand, has psychological themes and clearly..."

Have my fingers crosses as well--the story of the author's life makes me want to honor her work even more:

"The fate befalling the young woman who wanted "to be a poet" has been well documented. Desperately unhappy because of family tragedies and finding herself trapped in the wrong vocation (as a schoolteacher) her only escape appeared to be in submission to society's judgment of her as abnormal. She spent four and a half years out of eight years, incarcerated in mental hospitals. The story of her almost miraculous survival of the horrors and brutalising treatment in unenlightened institutions has become well known. She continued to write throughout her troubled years, and her first book (The Lagoon: A Collection of Short Stories) won a prestigious literary prize, thus convincing her doctors not to carry out a planned lobotomy.

She returned to society, but not the one which had labeled her a misfit. She sought the support and company of fellow writers and set out single-mindedly and courageously to achieve her goal of being a writer. She wrote her first novel, Owls Do Cry, while staying with her mentor Frank Sargeson, and then left New Zealand, not to return for seven years."

Jane Campion directed a film called An Angel at my Table. It documents the true-life story of Janet Frame, New Zealand's most distinguished author. The film follows Frame along her inspiring journey, from a poverty-stricken childhood to a misdiagnosis of schizophrenia and electroshock therapy to, finally, literary fame.

Chrissie, thanks so much for bringing this book to our attention.


message 26: by Julia (new)

Julia (juliastrimer) Hmm--our 60+ library consortium doesn't have Owls Do Cry for me to order, so I'll try to get it through WorldCat. Availability might be an issue with this one, sadly.


message 27: by Greg (new)

Greg | 7480 comments Mod
Have you seen the movie by Campion Julia? I thought it was pretty good. The movie brought Janet Frame to my attention; that was one of the things that inspired me to read parts of The Pocket Mirror: Poems. I'd like to read her fiction or memoirs too; so I was overjoyed to see Chrissie nominate Owls Do Cry. I'm sure I'll read it sometime, even if it doesn't win.


message 28: by Chrissie (new)

Chrissie Julia, Owls Do Cry is available at Amazon as a paperback and at Audible as an audiobook. I have read that the audiobook narrated by Heather Bolton is supposed to be good. I will choose the audiobook.


message 29: by Chrissie (new)

Chrissie Greg, I feel the same way. I will read it too even if it doesn't win.


message 30: by Greg (new)

Greg | 7480 comments Mod
Great Chrissie! :)


message 31: by Gail (new)

Gail (appleshoelace) I saw the Campion film on TV, back in the 90s, and found it very interesting. I have a few of Janet Frame's books, but not Owls Do Cry. It seems harder to get hold of than her other books. The city library where I live doesn't have a copy of it, and Amazon doesn't have a Kindle version.


message 32: by Leslie (new)

Leslie | 15985 comments So I think that we have 6 nominations that have been seconded already! Please speak up if I missed anything...

1. Fathers and Sons by Ivan Turgenev
2. Death Comes for the Archbishop by Willa Cather
3. Vanity Fair by William Makepeace Thackeray
4. A Handful of Dust by Evelyn Waugh
5. Owls Do Cry by Janet Frame
6. The Counterfeiters by André Gide

Nice variety but hard to choose just one!!


message 33: by Diane S ☔ (last edited Nov 11, 2014 03:08PM) (new)

Diane S ☔ Already read Vanity Fair but will add all the rest to my TBR, they do all sound good. May have a problem getting Owls Do Cry here in the US, the books seems to be awfully expensive unless you order a used copy only rated good. These are usually anything but good in my opinion. Will keep looking.


message 34: by Alannah (new)

Alannah Clarke (alannahclarke) | 11715 comments Mod
Leslie wrote: "So I think that we have 6 nominations that have been seconded already! Please speak up if I missed anything...

1. Fathers and Sons by Ivan Turgenev
2. [book:Death C..."


Agreed, so many choices.


message 35: by Sandy (new)

Sandy I second Christmas Holiday by Somerset Maugham.


message 36: by Petra (new)

Petra | 3248 comments This is going to be a hard choice to make. Great selections, everyone!


message 37: by Chrissie (last edited Nov 11, 2014 08:40PM) (new)

Chrissie Boy do I agree, good books have been chosen!!!! Impossible to choose if they are unread.


message 38: by Leslie (new)

Leslie | 15985 comments Sandy wrote: "I second Christmas Holiday by Somerset Maugham."

Normally, I would say since we have 6 already seconded this one should be postponed. However, it is such as seasonally appropriate choice that I will go with 7 in the poll this one time.


message 39: by Leslie (new)

Leslie | 15985 comments The poll for our December-January Group Classic book will open November 13 and run until November 25.

Please vote for the next classic we should read together at:

https://www.goodreads.com/poll/show/1...


message 40: by Alannah (new)

Alannah Clarke (alannahclarke) | 11715 comments Mod
I was staring at the poll womdering why I couldn't vote on it for a couple of minutes before I realised it wasn't the 13th, roll on Friday. Haha.


message 41: by Gill (new)

Gill | 5720 comments Alannah wrote: "I was staring at the poll womdering why I couldn't vote on it for a couple of minutes before I realised it wasn't the 13th, roll on Friday. Haha."

Oh, thanks Alannah. I was just going to ask why I can't vote!

Ps but isn't 13th Thursday? Not so long to wait!


message 42: by Alannah (new)

Alannah Clarke (alannahclarke) | 11715 comments Mod
Gill wrote: "Alannah wrote: "I was staring at the poll womdering why I couldn't vote on it for a couple of minutes before I realised it wasn't the 13th, roll on Friday. Haha."

Oh, thanks Alannah. I was just go..."


Yeah, it's tomorrow, I meant roll on Friday as in roll on the weekend. :L


message 43: by Shellie (new)

Shellie Uchtman (shelluch) | 60 comments They all look good trying to decide between two. The Owls Don't Cry and Christmas Holiday. Going to be a tough choice.


message 44: by Gail (new)

Gail (appleshoelace) I was also confused why I couldn't vote - I've never seen a poll I couldn't vote on before. I thought it must just be incompatible with my iPad.

I will vote for The Counterfeiters, as I seconded it, but there are several others I'd like to read, especially Turgenev and Janet Frame.


message 45: by Gill (new)

Gill | 5720 comments I can't see me getting myself sorted with a copy of the Janet Frame book, so it's Turgenev for me (a re-read).


message 46: by Leslie (new)

Leslie | 15985 comments Sorry for all the confusion -- I won't be online tomorrow so thought I would send the message today. Perhaps it would have been better to wait and send the message of the 14th?


message 47: by Alannah (new)

Alannah Clarke (alannahclarke) | 11715 comments Mod
No it's fine Leslie. I think we are confused because it might be the first time the poll has been done that way.


message 48: by Gail (new)

Gail (appleshoelace) Gill wrote: "I can't see me getting myself sorted with a copy of the Janet Frame book..."

Same here, to be honest, Gill, although I'd really love to read it. I really wish there was a Kindle version.

There's an audio download, though, if you like audiobooks. I have difficulties with auditory processing, so they don't work for me, but I know a lot of people like them.


message 49: by Gail (new)

Gail (appleshoelace) Alannah wrote: "No it's fine Leslie. I think we are confused because it might be the first time the poll has been done that way."

Same here - I've just never seen a poll like that. I'm glad I've seen it though - it's good to know that polls can be set up beforehand like that. It wouldn't have even occurred to me that this was a possibility.


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