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BIBLE STUDY > BIBLE STUDY OF BOOK OF PROVERBS WEEK # 7 (11/7/14)

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message 1: by Evangelist (new)

Evangelist Jordan (chosenwithcare) | 2028 comments Mod
Bible Study: (Book of Proverbs; Knowledge, Understanding, and Wisdom)
Date: ………11/7/14
Study: Week # 7

Prayer:
Heavenly Father, we honor and praise You for all Your goodness and mercy. Your wisdom is outstanding in this world. We see Your wisdom and creativity in everything we look at, the sky, the moon, the waters in the deep, the beautiful trees, awesome landscape, and everything. The world is full of Your beauty, Your wisdom. We are so grateful. Jesus has been made unto me wisdom, and in Him are all the treasures of divine wisdom, and of comprehensive insight into the ways and purposes of God, and all the riches of spiritual knowledge and enlightenment are stored up and lie hidden. God has hidden away sound and godly wisdom and stored it up for us, for we are the righteousness of God in Christ Jesus. Help us to walk in path of uprightness. When we walk, our steps shall not be hampered, because of our God. Enlighten our minds as we study this lesson. This we pray in Jesus’ name, amen.


Title: Book of Proverbs Part 1

Author: King Solomon is the principal writer of Proverbs. Solomon's name appears in 1:1, 10:1, and 25:1. We may also presume Solomon collected and edited proverbs other than his own, for Ecclesiastes 12:9 says, "Not only was the Teacher wise, but also he imparted knowledge to the people. He pondered and searched out and set in order many proverbs." Indeed, the Hebrew title Mishle Shelomoh is translated "Proverbs of Solomon." In chapters 30 and 31 are found the words of Agur and Lemuel.

Date of Writing: Solomon's proverbs were penned around 970-930 B.C. During his reign as king, the nation of Israel reached its pinnacle spiritually, politically, culturally, and economically. As Israel's reputation soared, so did King Solomon's. Foreign dignitaries from the far reaches of the known world traveled great distances to hear the wise monarch speak (1 Kings 4:34). He asked God for wisdom to rule God’s nation and He granted the request. The genre of Proverbs is mainly “Proverbs” as the name describes, there are also some Parables and Poetry.


Purpose of Writing: Knowledge is nothing more than an accumulation of raw facts, but wisdom is the ability to see people, events, and situations as God sees them. In the Book of Proverbs, Solomon reveals the mind of God in matters high and lofty and in common, ordinary, everyday situations, too. It appears that no topic escaped King Solomon's attention. Matters pertaining to personal conduct, sexual relations, business, wealth, charity, ambition, discipline, debt, child-rearing, character, alcohol, politics, revenge, and godliness are among the many topics covered in this rich collection of wise sayings; Also to give moral instruction, especially to young people.

Key Verses:

Proverbs 1:4, “These proverbs will give insight to the simple, knowledge and discernment to the young.”

Proverbs 1:5, "Let the wise listen and add to their learning, and let the discerning get guidance."

Proverbs 1:7, "The fear of the LORD is the beginning of knowledge, but fools despise wisdom and discipline.”

Proverbs 4:5, "Get wisdom, get understanding; do not forget my words or swerve from them."

Proverbs 8:13-14, "To fear the LORD is to hate evil; I hate pride and arrogance, evil behavior and perverse speech. Counsel and sound judgment are mine; I have understanding and power."

Brief Summary: Summarizing the Book of Proverbs is a bit difficult, for unlike many other books of Scripture, there is no particular plot or storyline found in its pages; likewise, there are no principal characters in the book. It is wisdom that takes center stage—a grand, divine wisdom that transcends the whole of history, peoples, and cultures. Even a perfunctory reading of this magnificent treasury reveals the pithy sayings of the wise King Solomon are as relevant today as they were some three thousand years ago.

Foreshadowings: The theme of wisdom and its necessity in our lives finds its fulfillment in Christ. We are continually exhorted in Proverbs to seek wisdom, get wisdom, and understand wisdom. Proverbs also tells us—and repeats it— that the fear of the Lord is the beginning of wisdom (1:7; 9:10). Our fear of the Lord’s wrath and justice is what drives us to Christ, who is the embodiment of God’s wisdom as expressed in His glorious plan of redemption for mankind. In Christ, “in whom are hidden all the treasures of wisdom and knowledge” (Colossians 2:3), we find the answer to our search for wisdom, the remedy for our fear of God, and the “righteousness, holiness and redemption” that we so desperately need (1 Corinthians 1:30). The wisdom that is found only in Christ is in contrast to the foolishness of the world which encourages us to be wise in our own eyes. But Proverbs also tells us that the world’s way is not God’s way (Proverbs 3:7) and leads only to death (Proverbs 14:12; 16:25).

Practical Application: There is an undeniable practicality found in this book, for sound and sensible answers to all manner of complex difficulties are found within its thirty-one chapters. Certainly, Proverbs is the greatest "how-to" book ever written, and those who have the good sense to take Solomon's lessons to heart will quickly discover godliness, prosperity, and contentment are theirs for the asking.

The recurring promise of the Book of Proverbs is that those who choose wisdom and follow God will be blessed in numerous ways: with long life (9:11); prosperity (2:20-22); joy (3:13-18); and the goodness of God (12:21). Those who reject Him, on the other hand, suffer shame and death (3:35; 10:21). To reject God is to choose folly over wisdom and is to separate ourselves from God, His Word, His wisdom and His blessings.

The main purpose of this book is to teach wisdom to God’s people. Proverbs are short clever explanations, which are easy to remember. They contain truisms. These are things which are typically true however, not always. For example, "He who tills his land will have plenty of bread" (12:11), it is typically true that one who works his land will have bread but it is not a guarantee to always be true. They deal with life, principles, good judgment, and perception. They often draw distinctions between a wise man and a foolish man with parable type examples.
• In chapters 1-9, Solomon writes about wisdom for younger people. He speaks of details of Godly living and heeding a parent’s advice, “The fear of the LORD is the beginning of knowledge” (1:7). Salvation is through faith and trust in Jesus Christ alone and Proverbs directly teaches us to, “Trust in the LORD with all your heart and do not lean on your own understanding. In all your ways acknowledge Him, And He will make your paths straight” (3:5-6).
• In chapters 10-24, there is wisdom that applies to average people covering various topics. Many of these parables contrast a righteous man and a wicked man, and urges us to commit our way to God, “There is a way which seems right to a man, but its end is the way of death” (14:12).
• Chapters 25-31, give wisdom to leaders. It was these very proverbs that were transcribed by King Hezekiah’s people, and for good reason (25:1). They contain many warnings and instructions to assist in walking and seeking a Godly life. As would be understood by a leader of an army, Solomon writes in 27:17, “Iron sharpens iron, so one man sharpens another.”
To understand something of the correspondence of the lines in the book of Proverbs is greatly helpful if one understands what a "parallelism" is. A "parallelism" is a pair of statements laid alone side one another.

Sometimes one and one are more than two. By bringing two ideas together in a parallelism, the book of Proverbs communicates more than the mere sum of two ideas. The positions of two statements at times create a puzzle. One must understand how the two ideas relate to one another, whether by contrast, comparison or some other relationship is suggested.

In a "synonymous parallelism," the message gets fuller expression by being stated twice, while in an "antithetical parallelism," both the message and its converse are displayed. Let's look at them!

1). SYNONYMOUS PARALLELISM - (synonymous meaning "alike")

In a synonymous parallelism two ideas are brought together saying the same thing in different words. The second line often repeats the first line in an altered form, in order to express the lesson of the proverb with maximum clarity.
These are also referred to as "comparative couplets." A "couplet" being two lines joined together.
The key link between two statements is "better than," "like," or "so." The two statements introduce two kinds of circumstances, or choices, showing one to be preferable. [Examples would be Proverbs 15:16; 25:24-15] It may not have a conjunction, as in Proverbs 18:20. At times part of the idea may be omitted, because it is implied by the other idea, as in Proverbs 14:19 (The verb is omitted from the second line, but implied that the "wicked will bow down at the gate of the righteous." Note Proverbs 18:18 the subject is omitted.

2). ANTITHETICAL PARALLELISM - (antithetical meaning "opposite")

In an antithetical parallelism two ideas are contrasted with one another.
These are also referred to as "contractive couplets" - Two parts differing from one another laid along-side each other in order to penetrate both sides of a problem. Each should be given careful thought.
Antithetical parallelism usually are connected with the conjunction "but," such as in Proverbs 10:1, 5, 29; 19:16; 13:1 and 18.

3). SYNTHETIC PARALLELISM - (synthetic meaning "complete")

In a synthetic parallelism parts are put together to form a whole.
These are also referred to as "completive couplets." The link between the two statements is usually "and," or, "so," as in Proverbs 14:10, 13; and 16:3. - [Other examples would be Proverbs 15:31; 17:6; 19:26.]
It sometimes argues from the lesser to the greater, as in Proverbs 11:31, or from the greater to the less as in Proverbs 19:10 or 21:27.

Sometimes a synthetic parallelism shows "one thing better than another" as in Proverbs 16:16; 21:9, 19; or 17:1. Sometimes the first line of a synthetic parallelism is the statement and the second line, the consequence, as in Proverbs 20:4; or 20:19.

4). EMBLEMATIC PARALLELISM - (emblematic meaning "a type")

In an emblematic parallelism, the first line is an emblem, illustration, type, or example drawn from nature or daily life.
Often a riddle is posed by an emblematic parallelism, as in Proverbs 27:15;
25:18-19, 23, 27; 10:26.

Sometimes a synonymous parallelism is emblematic as well.
The first line illustrates the second line, much like a political cartoon in the newspaper. The first line serves as the picture, while the second line serves as the caption. An example is found in Proverbs 25:13.

Sometimes the comparison may not be stated, as in Proverbs 25:14. To understand this proverb, think of yourself as a farmer, with seed in the ground, and "clouds and wind," however, the clouds and wind are, "without rain." Imagine the disappointment! It is the same way with a man who raises hopes of profit and advantage, when he boasts of his gifts, and, then, like the farmer, hope is dashed, when the boaster does not follow through with his promise of giving.
[Other examples of "emblematic parallelism" are Proverbs 27:15 and 17]

In understanding an "emblematic parallelism" he should ask questions like, "If `A' is like
`B,' then how is `A' like `B'?
An example would be Proverbs 25:11, which states, "A word aptly spoken is like apples of gold in settings of silver." One should ask, "How is a `word aptly spoken' like `apples of gold in settings of silver?'" [The answer, "Words, aptly spoken, adorn, attract attention like an intricate, skillfully executed piece of jewelry."

Continue on next post................


message 2: by Evangelist (last edited Nov 13, 2014 11:21AM) (new)

Evangelist Jordan (chosenwithcare) | 2028 comments Mod
Let's Continue:


An example would be Proverbs 25:11, which states, "A word aptly spoken is like apples of gold in settings of silver." One should ask, "How is a `word aptly spoken' like `apples of gold in settings of silver?'" [The answer, "Words, aptly spoken, adorn, attract attention like an intricate, skillfully executed piece of jewelry."

In Proverbs 25:18 it states, "Like a club or a sword or a sharp arrow is the man who gives false testimony against his neighbor." The question would be, "How is a man that gives false testimony against his neighbor like a club or a sword or a sharp arrow?" [The answer, "Both are like waging war."
There are seven divisions in the Book of Proverbs.
DIVISION I = Proverbs 1:7 to 9:18.
DIVISION II = “The Proverbs of Solomon” Proverbs 10:1 to 22;16.
DIVISION III = “The words of the wise [ones]” Proverbs 22:22 to 24:22.
DIVISION IV = “These also belong to the wise [ones]” Proverbs 24:23 to 24:34,
DIVISION V = “These are also proverbs of Solomon, which the men of Hezekiah king of Judah copied” Proverbs 25:1 to 29:27.
There are yet two remaining divisions to the Proverbs. These final two sections seem to represent individual compositions about two men of whom we have no further information as to their identities in the Bible.
DIVISION VI = “The words of Agar the son of Jakeh” Proverbs 30 (the whole chapter).
DIVISION VII = “The words of king Lemuel” Proverbs 31 (the whole chapter).
Key Verse: Proverbs 1:4
Key Thought: “The fear of the Lord,” which occurs fourteen times.”

Subjects specially discussed:
Anger
Benevolence
Children, correction of
Enticers
Fear of God
Fools
Friendship
Indolence
Knowledge, Divine
Oppression
Pride
Prudence
Scorners
Strife
Temperance
The Tongue
Unjust Gain
Wealth
Women, evil
Women, good

Spiritual Lesson
Solomon was a guide-post, rather than an example. He pointed the way to Wisdom, but in the latter part of his life he did not walk in it; hence his son, Rehoboam, followed his example, rather than his counsels, and became a foolish and evil ruler.


Let’s Recap Proverbs:

Who wrote the book?
Proverbs, like Psalms, names multiple individuals as the authors of its various sections. Solomon was uniquely qualified to serve as the principal author for this book of wise sayings. First Kings 3:5–9 recounts Solomon asking God for wisdom in his reign over Israel, a request God eventually granted (1 Kings 4:29–31). In fact, Solomon identified himself as the source of most of the book. His name appears at the beginning of three distinct sections—Proverbs 1:1, 10:1, and 25:1—covering almost all of the first twenty-nine chapters of the book. A short section consisting of Proverbs 22:17–24:34 expresses “the words of the wise” (Proverbs 22:17), which Solomon may have compiled from various sources. Evidence that Solomon drew on multiple sources appears in Proverbs 24:23, where Solomon used the plural noun for “wise” (also translated sages) to describe the authors of this section. Also, due to the book’s similarities with Mesopotamian and Egyptian collections of proverbs such as “The Instruction of Amenemope,” it’s possible that God inspired Solomon to record this section based on wise sayings he had been exposed to throughout his life.1 The final two chapters identify Agur (30:1) and Lemuel (31:1) as their authors, though the identities of these men remain mysterious in history.

Where are we?
The composition of Proverbs remains one of the most difficult questions about the book. Its strong association with Solomon means most of its contents were completed prior to his death in 931 BC. Clearly the book stayed in the southern kingdom of Judah, as Hezekiah’s men compiled more of Solomon’s proverbs in Proverbs 25–29. This indicates that the book was likely in its final form sometime before the end of Hezekiah’s reign in 686 BC.

Why is Proverbs so important?
Proverbs accomplishes something no other biblical book does: it simply compiles numerous short instructions for living an effective life on earth. While other books articulate profound theological truths, lengthy narratives of triumph and failure, or prophetic preaching to a disobedient people, Proverbs concerns itself completely with instructing people in the path of wisdom. The writers of the book recognized the varied circumstances of a person’s life and provided principles to apply in a variety of situations rather than instructions to follow in only a few specific instances.

What's the big idea?
Proverbs states its theme explicitly very early in the book: “The fear of the Lord is the beginning of knowledge” (Proverbs 1:7). The fear of the Lord refers to our viewing Him with the respect He deserves. It means living our lives in light of what we know of Him, holding Him in the highest estimation, and depending on Him with humble trust. Only then, Proverbs teaches, will we discover knowledge and wisdom (see also 9:10). In writing the Proverbs, Solomon hoped that his readers would attain practical righteousness in all things and that we would do this by living our lives under the authority and direction of God. He specifically explained the book’s purpose in 1:2–6, focusing on imparting understanding that would impact every facet of our lives. Much of the book emphasizes listening to others so that we might learn from them and apply the combined knowledge of those who have gone before us—such as parents and elders—to the unique circumstances of our own lives (1:5, 8). Wisdom then involves appropriating a measure of humility, first before God and then before others. If instead, we decide to speak rashly rather than listen attentively . . . well, Proverbs deals with that too (12:15; 13:3).

How do I apply this?
Read it! Then live it! Proverbs contains some of the most applicable nuggets of truth in all of the Bible. Most of the proverbs are pithy statements brimming over with imagery from the real world. This approach allows us to see very clearly how any particular proverb might be applied to any number of everyday situations we encounter—from getting out of bed in the morning to building a strong foundation in our relationships with others. Proverbs reminds us that God concerns Himself not just with the big, cataclysmic events of life but even those mundane, “invisible” moments in our lives as well.

Are you following God, even in those seemingly “small” circumstances? Allow Proverbs to refocus your attention on all the hidden moments of your life.


Scripture References:
Proverbs 2:1-7
Proverbs 4:10-11
Proverbs 5:1
Proverbs 6:6
Proverbs 8:17
Proverbs 9:10
Proverbs 12:15
Proverbs 13:20

Questions:
1). Who wrote the book of Proverbs?
2). How many chapters in the book of Proverbs?
3). Name a few blessings Proverbs talk about that we can gain personally in our lives.
4). On the other hand, those who reject Him will experience what?
5). Give another name for the Book of Proverbs.
6). What is the focus verse of the book of Proverbs?
7). King Solomon’s wisdom was a ______ from God.
8). Why is Proverbs so important?
9). How do I apply the Book of Proverbs?
10). How is a man that gives false testimony against his neighbor like a club or a sharp arrow?


Weekly Reading: (optional)
Proverbs: Chapters 25-28


God grant us the serenity to accept the things we cannot change; courage to change the things we can, and the WISDOM to know the different, amen…..

God bless this study (II Timothy 2:15)


message 3: by Evangelist (new)

Evangelist Jordan (chosenwithcare) | 2028 comments Mod
Pray with me, please:



Heavenly Father, we honor and praise You for all Your goodness and mercy. Your wisdom is outstanding in this world. We see Your wisdom and creativity in everything we look at, the sky, the moon, the waters in the deep, the beautiful trees, awesome landscape, and everything. The world is full of Your beauty, Your wisdom. We are so grateful. Jesus has been made unto me wisdom, and in Him are all the treasures of divine wisdom, and of comprehensive insight into the ways and purposes of God, and all the riches of spiritual knowledge and enlightenment are stored up and lie hidden. God has hidden away sound and godly wisdom and stored it up for us, for we are the righteousness of God in Christ Jesus. Help us to walk in path of uprightness. When we walk, our steps shall not be hampered, because of our God. Enlighten our minds as we study this lesson. This we pray in Jesus’ name, amen.


message 4: by Evangelist (new)

Evangelist Jordan (chosenwithcare) | 2028 comments Mod
A man with Wisdom in the Bible…….



King David: A Man after God’s Own Heart

King David was a man of contrasts. He was single-mindedly committed to God, yet guilty of some of the most serious sins recorded in the Old Testament. David lived a frustrating life, first in the shadow of his brothers, then constantly on the run from vengeful King Saul. Even after he became king of Israel, David was engaged in almost constant warfare to defend the kingdom. King David was a great military conqueror, but he could not conquer himself. He allowed one night of lust with Bathsheba, and it had disastrous consequences in his life. Although King David fathered Solomon, one of Israel's greatest kings, he was also the father of Absalom, whose rebellion brought bloodshed and grief. King David's life was a roller coaster of emotional highs and lows. He left us an example of passionate love of God and dozens of psalms, some of the most touching, beautiful poetry ever written. King David's Accomplishments: David killed Goliath, champion of the Philistines, when David was only a youth and Goliath a giant and veteran warrior. David was victorious because he trusted in God for the victory, not himself. He killed many of Israel's enemies in battle. Despite several opportunities, David refused to kill King Saul, God's first anointed king, who was pursuing David out of mad jealousy. He became friends, like brothers, with Saul's son Jonathan, setting a model of friendship that everyone can learn from. King David is included in the "Faith Hall of Fame" in Hebrews 11. David was an ancestor of Jesus Christ. Jesus was often called "Son of David." God called David a man after his own heart. King David's Strengths: David was courageous and strong in battle, trusting in God for protection. He was loyal to Saul, despite Saul's crazed pursuit of him. David loved God deeply throughout his entire life. King David's Weaknesses: King David committed adultery with Bathsheba. He then tried to cover up her pregnancy, and when he failed with that, he had her husband Uriah the Hittite killed. He took a census of the people, willfully violating God's command not to do that. King David was sometimes lax, or absent as a father, not disciplining his children when they needed it. God always offers forgiveness for our sins, but we cannot escape the consequences. God highly values our faith in him. Despite life's ups and downs, God is ever-present to give us comfort and help.

King David's story runs from 1 Samuel 16 through 1 Kings 2. David wrote much of the book of Psalms and is also mentioned in Matthew 1:1, 6, 22, 43-45; Luke 1:32; Acts 13:22; Romans 1:3; and Hebrews 11:32.

Scripture:
1 Samuel 16:7
"The LORD does not look at the things people look at. People look at the outward appearance, but the LORD looks at the heart." (NIV)
1 Samuel 17:50
So David triumphed over the Philistine with a sling and a stone; without a sword in his hand he struck down the Philistine and killed him. (NIV)
1 Samuel 30:6
David was greatly distressed because the men were talking of stoning him; each one was bitter in spirit because of his sons and daughters. But David found strength in the LORD his God. (NIV)
2 Samuel 12:12-13
Then David said to Nathan, "I have sinned against the LORD." Nathan replied, "The LORD has taken away your sin. You are not going to die. But because by doing this you have shown utter contempt for the LORD, the son born to you will die." (NIV)
Psalm 23:6
Surely your goodness and love will follow me all the days of my life, and I will dwell in the house of the LORD forever. (NIV)

Proverbs:
Proverbs 24:14
So shall the knowledge of wisdom be unto thy soul: when thou hast found it, then there shall be a reward, and thy expectation shall not be cut off.
Proverbs 20:5
Counsel in the heart of man is like deep water; but a man of understanding will draw it out.

Proverbs 21:1-2
The king's heart is in the hand of the LORD, as the rivers of water: he turneth it whithersoever he will.
2 Every way of a man is right in his own eyes: but the LORD pondereth the hearts.


message 5: by Evangelist (new)

Evangelist Jordan (chosenwithcare) | 2028 comments Mod
Identifying a Parallelism:



Proverbs 15:16………………..Synonymous Parallelism
“Better is little with the fear of the LORD than great treasure and trouble therewith.”
(Comparative couplets) (Alike)

Proverbs 10:1…………………….Antithetical Parallelism
“The proverbs of Solomon, a wise son maketh a glad father: but a foolish son is the heaviness of his mother.”
(Contractive couplets) (Opposite)

Proverbs 16:16…………………Synthetic Parallelism
“How much better is it to get wisdom than gold! and to get understanding rather to be chosen than silver!”
(Completive couplets) (Complete)

Proverbs 25:11…………………..Emblematic Parallelism
“A word fitly spoken is like apples of gold in pictures of silver.”
(A Type)

Proverbs 27:15……………………Emblematic Parallelism
“A continual dropping in a very rainy day and a contentious woman are alike.”
(Sometimes a synonymous parallelism is emblematic as well.)

To understand this you must study hard, and ask God for the spirit of knowledge, understanding, and wisdom


message 6: by Evangelist (new)

Evangelist Jordan (chosenwithcare) | 2028 comments Mod
I have finished my weekly reading, and my scripture references. It’s a joy to read God’s Word. God’s Word blesses our heart, mind, and soul.



Scripture References:
Proverbs 2:1-7
Proverbs 4:10-11
Proverbs 5:1
Proverbs 6:6
Proverbs 8:17
Proverbs 9:10
Proverbs 12:15
Proverbs 13:20


Weekly Reading: (optional)
Proverbs: Chapters 25-28


message 7: by Evangelist (new)

Evangelist Jordan (chosenwithcare) | 2028 comments Mod
Answers to Questions:


1). Who wrote the book of Proverbs?
King Solomon wrote must of it, but in chapters 30 and 31 are found the words of Agur and Lemuel.

2). How many chapters in the book of Proverbs?
There are 31 chapters in this book

3). Name a few blessings Proverbs talk about that we can gain personally in our lives.
We can long life, joy, and the goodness of God; we can gain godliness, prosperity, and contentment. And, we can have spiritual understanding, spiritual knowledge, and wisdom.

4). On the other hand, those who reject Him will experience what?
Suffer sham and death. To reject God is to choose folly over wisdom and is to separate ourselves from God, His Word, His wisdom, and His blessings.

5). Give another name for the Book of Proverbs.
The Hebrew title Mishle Shelomoh is translated “Proverbs of Solomon.”

6). What is the focus verse of the book of Proverbs?
Chapter 1:4 “To give subtilty to the simple, to the young man knowledge and discretion.”

7). King Solomon’s wisdom was a ______ from God.
This wisdom was a gift from God

8). Why is Proverbs so important?
Proverbs concerns itself completely with instructing people in the path of wisdom. The writers of the book recognized the varied circumstances of a person’s life and provided principles to apply in a variety of situations rather than instructions to follow in only a few specific instances.

9). How do I apply the Book of Proverbs?
Read it! Then live it! Applying it to our lives help us to be wise people of God.


10). How is a man that gives false testimony against his neighbor like a club or a sharp arrow?
The both are like waging war.


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