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AMERICAN DEMOCRACY - GOVERNMENT > MID-TERM ELECTIONS

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message 1: by Bentley, Group Founder, Leader, Chief (new)

Bentley | 44168 comments Mod
This thread is about "mid-term elections".

Please feel free to discuss books, or any other media regarding mid-term elections either past, present or future.

No self promotion please.


message 2: by Bentley, Group Founder, Leader, Chief (last edited Apr 12, 2018 09:22PM) (new)

Bentley | 44168 comments Mod
What It Takes

What It Takes The Way to the White House by Richard Ben Cramer by Richard Ben Cramer Richard Ben Cramer

Synopsis: (This synopsis was written in the future tense)

In less than two weeks, Americans will go to the polls to vote in the midterm elections. At least, some of them will — about 40% of eligible voters, if past elections are any indication. This year's races have already made stars — some rising, some falling — out of Americans hoping to represent their states and districts.

Some, like Kansas Senate hopeful Greg Orman and Georgia governor candidate Jason Carter, may pull off surprising victories. Others, like Wendy Davis in the Texas governor race have seen their once bright lights fade.

Even in its best moments, running for office is a roller coaster. Who are these people who are willing to put themselves and their families through constant scrutiny by the press, blistering attacks from their opponents, and hateful comments from Internet trolls?

There's no easy answer to that question, but in his book What It Takes, the late Richard Ben Cramer came closer to finding out than just about anybody before or since.

Cramer followed the Republican and Democratic candidates for the presidency in 1988, and chronicled what it was like for politicians to run the cruel and unforgiving gauntlet that is the American election system. Cramer writes, "I wanted to know enough about these people to see ... once they decided to run, and marched (or slid, or flung themselves headlong) into this semi-rational, all-consuming quest ... what happened to those lives ... to the lives they shared? What happened to their idea of themselves?"

Calling What It Takes exhaustive would be a massive understatement. The book is over 1,000 pages long, and Cramer takes a hard look at what made these presidential hopefuls tick. Although the election was 26 years ago, there are, of course, familiar faces. There's George H. W. Bush, whose grandson George P. Bush is in the running for Texas Land Commissioner this November. And there's Joe Biden, just as passionate and glad-handing in 1988 as he is today.

Cramer, who died last year, was more of a gonzo reporter than a Beltway pundit, and his writing style had echoes of Tom Wolfe and Hunter S. Thompson. That's part of what makes What It Takes so illuminating — he focused on the people behind the public personas.

There's Gary Hart and his wife, Lee, facing a pack of reporters and photographers obsessed with Hart's relationship with the model Donna Rice. "As Hart moved, the pack moved, backward, blindly, crushing whatever was in its path. There was kid three or four years old who was getting trampled. Hart was furious. He'd always hated those gang-bang photo-blitzkriegs ... but now he was powerless."

There's George H. W. Bush, caught on an open microphone after a fight with Dan Rather, making use of a few choice profanities . "Bush was like a warrior with his foot on his enemy's neck, whooping to the heavens. ... Bush apologized for his language, insisted he never would have taken the Lord's name in vain if he'd known people could hear him. (As if the commandment read: Thou Shalt Check Thy Mike.)"

What he found wasn't always pretty — in fact it seldom was — and that's why Cramer's book is possibly the best one ever written about an American election. It takes a special kind of person to run for office — you've got to be tenacious, focused, and maybe even a little crazy. We might never find out why the men and women running this year chose to enter the cutthroat world of politics. But in a few days, we'll find out which ones couldn't manage to weather the political storms, and which ones had what it takes.

The above courtesy of NPR: http://www.npr.org/2014/10/24/3585515...


message 3: by Bentley, Group Founder, Leader, Chief (last edited Nov 05, 2014 07:42AM) (new)

Bentley | 44168 comments Mod
Is rout the right word? What are your thoughts about what happened nationally or locally in your state or region?

Some folks are not happy?
http://dailycaller.com/2014/11/05/the...


message 4: by Bentley, Group Founder, Leader, Chief (new)

Bentley | 44168 comments Mod
Politics of Congressional Elections

The Politics of Congressional Elections (Longman Classics Series) by Gary C. Jacobson by Gary C. Jacobson (no photo)

Synopsis:

Updated in its 8th edition, The Politics of Congressional Elections has been brought completely up-to-date with the latest data from the National Election Study and the Federal Election Commission. It now includes coverage and analysis of the 2008 and 2010 elections and continues to make connections to broader themes and fundamental questions about representation and responsibility. This seminal work continues to offer a systematic account of what goes on in congressional elections and demonstrates how electoral politics reflect and shape other components of the political system, with profound consequences for representative government.


message 5: by Bentley, Group Founder, Leader, Chief (last edited Apr 12, 2018 09:22PM) (new)

Bentley | 44168 comments Mod
Congress Reconsidered, 10th Edition

Congress Reconsidered by Lawrence C. Dodd by Lawrence C. Dodd (no photo)

Synopsis:

Since its first edition, Congress Reconsidered was designed to make available the best contemporary work from leading congressional scholars in a form that is both challenging and accessible to undergraduates. For almost four decades, Dodd and Oppenheimer have delivered on this goal. With their tenth edition, this tradition continues, but with the benefit of contributing authors now able to focus on how various aspects of Congress have changed over time. Gary Jacobson not only analyzes congressional elections in the present day, but looks at changes that have occurred in elections since the 1970s. James Thurber places today's struggles over the budget in the context of budget politics since the passage of the Budget and Impoundment Control Act. John Aldrich, Brittany Perry, and David Rohde trace the evolution of the House's most influential committees, while Kathryn Pearson examines the growth (in number and influence) of women members of Congress. Simply put, this volume remains on the cutting edge with key insights into the workings of Congress.


message 6: by Bentley, Group Founder, Leader, Chief (last edited Nov 05, 2014 08:01AM) (new)

Bentley | 44168 comments Mod
Something to ponder about - political order:

Political Order and Political Decay From the Industrial Revolution to the Globalization of Democracy by Francis Fukuyama by Francis Fukuyama Francis Fukuyama

Synopsis:

Writing in The Wall Street Journal, David Gress called Francis Fukuyama’s Origins of Political Order “magisterial in its learning and admirably immodest in its ambition.”

In The New York Times Book Review, Michael Lind described the book as “a major achievement by one of the leading public intellectuals of our time.” And in The Washington Post, Gerard DeGrott exclaimed “this is a book that will be remembered. Bring on volume two.”

Volume two is finally here, completing the most important work of political thought in at least a generation. Taking up the essential question of how societies develop strong, impersonal, and accountable political institutions, Fukuyama follows the story from the French Revolution to the so-called Arab Spring and the deep dysfunctions of contemporary American politics. He examines the effects of corruption on governance, and why some societies have been successful at rooting it out. He explores the different legacies of colonialism in Latin America, Africa, and Asia, and offers a clear-eyed account of why some regions have thrived and developed more quickly than others. And he boldly reckons with the future of democracy in the face of a rising global middle class and entrenched political paralysis in the West.

A sweeping, masterful account of the struggle to create a well-functioning modern state, Political Order and Political Decay is destined to be a classic.

This is volume two.


message 7: by Bentley, Group Founder, Leader, Chief (last edited Nov 05, 2014 08:03AM) (new)

Bentley | 44168 comments Mod
What Happened?:

Midterm Elections 2014: A Super Duper Easy Viewer's Guide to the Battle for the Senate

http://abcnews.go.com/Politics/midter...

Source: ABC


message 8: by Jill (new)

Jill Hutchinson (bucs1960) It was like a red tide rolling!!! And only in WV, could an 18 year old be elected to the State House of Delegates!!


message 9: by Bryan (last edited Nov 05, 2014 12:02PM) (new)

Bryan Craig Republicans were definitely savvy this time around, and by pushing the message, "I'm not Obama, so vote for me" worked well. However, I think voters were frustrated with all Congress and willing to throw out more incumbents


message 10: by Bentley, Group Founder, Leader, Chief (last edited Nov 05, 2014 01:16PM) (new)

Bentley | 44168 comments Mod
It was a little strange last night Jill. It was throw the baby out with the bath water night.

Bryan - so true. However, I am a little worried about some of the folks they invited back - Mitch McConnell is not my fave but of course he must be somebody's since he got re-elected.

I think mid term elections are very interesting and have quite a history.


message 11: by Bryan (new)

Bryan Craig Indeed, Bentley, and you have the "six-year itch" for a president, and it never goes well for the sitting president.

Apparently, McConnell has dreamed of being majority leader for a long time. He really focused on Senate rules and ethics for the time he was in the Senate. It will be interesting to see how he runs the Senate.

Our Virginia Senate race is still going on.


message 12: by Bentley, Group Founder, Leader, Chief (last edited Nov 06, 2014 10:55AM) (new)

Bentley | 44168 comments Mod
For sure - but this midterm was a painful one for President Obama.

Amazing about Virginia - I thought CNN called it - oh wait - they have made mistakes before (smile).

As far as McConnell - not my favorite - I think he should show more respect for the person who is President no matter who that happens to be. It is hard to see someone who has been a bottleneck on everything get rewarded.


message 13: by Nance (new)

Nance (carousel1231) | 22 comments I agree with your comment about respect for the President, no matter who is in office. I used to feel a sense of pride when I saw a picture of the US Capital building. Not so much anymore.


message 14: by Bentley, Group Founder, Leader, Chief (last edited Nov 14, 2014 03:57AM) (new)

Bentley | 44168 comments Mod
You have a nice friend in your avatar - love mine too.

I hear you Nance - I feel the same way about anybody who is occupying that office. I felt the same about George W. Bush. Respect the presidency.


message 15: by Bryan (new)

Bryan Craig Elections are a great way to attack the president as we know. On top of that, we "personalize" a president, now to a point, he is one of us. You see him drinking a beer or going on the late-night talk shows. I think that plays a role in demystifying the office, and you feel less respect.


message 16: by Jill (new)

Jill Hutchinson (bucs1960) Bryan wrote: "Elections are a great way to attack the president as we know. On top of that, we "personalize" a president, now to a point, he is one of us. You see him drinking a beer or going on the late-night..."

How right you are, Bryan. I'm not sure it is a good thing to think of the President as just one of the guys. He has huge responsibilities and should be treated in a manner that recognizes that......instead the media delves into his personal life and tells us things we don't need to know. I think it tarnishes the image of the POTUS but maybe I am just old fashioned.


message 17: by Bentley, Group Founder, Leader, Chief (last edited Nov 14, 2014 04:14AM) (new)

Bentley | 44168 comments Mod
Bryan wrote: "Elections are a great way to attack the president as we know. On top of that, we "personalize" a president, now to a point, he is one of us. You see him drinking a beer or going on the late-night..."

I agree - I do not want the president to be a "regular guy or gal" - I want them to be "smarter, more talented, excel at leadership" etc. And I do not want to see any entertainment specials with "fluffy" questions - if they want to answer questions face the press and have more joint or solo press conferences.


message 18: by Nance (new)

Nance (carousel1231) | 22 comments Bentley wrote: "You have a nice friend in your avatar - love mine too.

I hear you Nance - I feel the same way about anybody who is occupying that office. I felt the same about George W. Bush. Respect the presid..."


You have a great looking dog - very regal. Love mine too. She came from Erie County NY SPCA.


message 19: by Bentley, Group Founder, Leader, Chief (new)

Bentley | 44168 comments Mod
She looks sweet.


message 20: by Jill (new)

Jill Hutchinson (bucs1960) Now the results of the mid-term elections are starting to do their magic or damage, depending on what side you are on. In our state we are getting some of the strangest and most controversial bills introduced and passed. The Governor is promising veto but the Republicans only have to have a simple majority to overturn the veto. We have some real problems on the horizon.


message 21: by Bentley, Group Founder, Leader, Chief (new)

Bentley | 44168 comments Mod
Yes we do - you get what you vote for.


message 22: by Bentley, Group Founder, Leader, Chief (new)

Bentley | 44168 comments Mod
Ten Predictions 2018: Plus the US Midterm Election Forecast

Ten Predictions 2018 Plus the US Midterm Election Forecast by John Hogue by John Hogue (no photo)

Synopsis:

These ten prediction essays focus on what will rock everyone’s world in the new year. Waiting between the lines of this quick, compact and comprehensive look at 2018 is what world-renowned prophecy scholar and Nostradamus expert John Hogue defines with one word.

Brace yourself for a roller-coaster ride through the year of “Acceleration”!

Let Hogue be your guide answering what will be the outcome of future challenges that will affect your life, including:

*What will be the conclusion of the Muller investigation into Russian Hacks?

*Will Trump be impeached?

*Who is the next and most formidable new candidate for Nostradamus’ third and Final Antichrist?

*What is the future for Artificial Intelligence? Let Hogue illuminate what this label for a brave new world of robotic intelligence fundamentally overlooks.

*Is this the year that empowers women around the world?

*Will a new celebrity overthrow the current celebrity occupying the White House in 2020 despite all of her public protestation that she will not run?

*Get Hogue’s “New Abnormal” weather report for 2018.

*What’s with “Hollyweird” and its witch hunts?

*Are we all too fixated on watching the Korean Peninsula when the real time bomb lighting off World War III lies elsewhere, sudden and unexpected?

*Who is “Adolf Algorithm” hiding behind the successful return of Net Neutrality?

*Finally, John Hogue closes this captivating book giving his detailed astrological forecast predicting who will control US Congress after the most important US Midterm Election in history, scheduled for 6 November 2018.

“I have known John Hogue for fifteen years. Every year, he predicts on the program [Dreamland] and every year, he proves to be fireproof. He's accurate. Uncannily accurate!”

—Whitley Strieber, author of “Communion” and “The Coming Global Superstorm” with Art Bell

John Hogue is author of over 1,000 articles and 46 published books (1,180,000 copies sold) spanning 20 languages. He has predicted the winner of every US Presidential Election by popular vote since 1968, giving him a remarkable 13 and 0 batting average. Hogue is a world-renowned expert on the prophecies of Nostradamus and other prophetic traditions. He claims to focus on interpreting the world’s ancient-to-modern prophets and prophecies with fresh eyes, seeking to connect readers with the shared and collective visions of terror, wonder and revelation about the future in a conversational narrative style. Hogue says the future is a temporal echo of actions initiated today. He strives to take readers “back to the present” empowering them to create a better destiny through accessing the untapped potentials of free will and meditation.


message 23: by Bentley, Group Founder, Leader, Chief (last edited Mar 02, 2019 03:56PM) (new)

Bentley | 44168 comments Mod
Cyber Command Operation Took Down Russian Troll Farm for Midterm Elections
Note: We have to be vigilant folks


Voters at the Topeka Civic Theater in Kansas last year during the midterm elections. The United States Cyber Command took a Russian troll farm off line on Election Day to block any potential interference. Credit: Barrett Emke for The New York Times

By Julian E. Barnes
Feb. 26, 2019

WASHINGTON — The American military took down a Russian troll farm last Election Day in a cyberattack that continued for several days after the vote, part of what United States officials have said is a persistent campaign to block and deter interference in American democracy.

The operation was intended to prevent the Internet Research Agency, based in St. Petersburg, Russia, from spreading propaganda or disinformation aimed at undermining confidence in the midterm vote or the results of the election, American officials said.

The operation was aimed at taking the Internet Research Agency off line for several days, from Election Day until the results were certified by local officials.

The Internet Research Agency, the best known of the Russian troll farms that create large amounts of propaganda, has been accused by the United States government of meddling in the 2016 elections. It is not part of the Russian government, but is controlled by oligarchs loyal to President Vladimir V. Putin of Russia.

Remainder of article:
https://www.nytimes.com/2019/02/26/us...

Source: New York Times


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