YA, MG, Seriously discussion

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So? What book are you in love with now?

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message 1: by Sharman (new)

Sharman Russell (sharmanaptrussell) | 212 comments Mod
I have to say I really enjoyed HOW I LIVE NOW by Meg Rosoff, Michael L. Printz Award, 2004. A wonderful voice and writing style. I'm a sucker, of course, for stories of war and dystopia and the Edens we create in the middle of all that. I am reading her latest book now, PICTURE ME GONE.


message 2: by Shelley (new)

Shelley Muniz (shelleymuniz) | 21 comments I've read the popular series: Twilight, Hunger Games, Divergent and like/don't like certain things about each. Although I must say, they all reeled me in.


message 3: by Andi (new)

Andi (andilit) | 1 comments To be honest, I need some recommendations here.Like you, Shelley, I've read a lot of the series and enjoyed those, but for more serious YA, I don't know much, sadly. How I Live Now is going on my list though, Sharman.


message 4: by Jennifer (new)

Jennifer Campbell | 1 comments In MG Shelia Turnage has "The Ghosts of Tupelo Landing" and "Three Times Lucky" which are wonderful. They're filled with fun word plays, characters I want to talk to, and kids riding around on bicycles. I love kids on bikes.


message 5: by Jo-Ann (new)

Jo-Ann Mapson (joannmapson) | 1 comments My old favorites:
Norma Klein: Mom, the Wolfman & Me
Louise Fitzhugh: Harriet the Spy, and Nobody's Family is Going to Change
Peter Beagle: Last Unicorn and A Fine & Private Place

Alas, both women writers are dead, but in my humble opinion, anyone who wishes to write a novel of ANY kind, should go and read YA deeply, because if you can keep a YA reader's attention, then you can keep an adult's attention, too.


message 7: by Shelley (new)

Shelley Muniz (shelleymuniz) | 21 comments Just starting an abundance of katherines by John Green.


message 8: by Joanna (new)

Joanna Leona (joannabranson_author) I loved the Divergent trilogy, but the Hunger Games... not so much. I am also very excited about the recent (today?!) release of the 3rd book (Mortal Heart)in the "His Fair Assassins" trilogy by Robin LaFevers. The idea of a convent order serving St. Mortain (the God of Death) and training female assassins to do his work captured my imagination from "go!" Being set in medieval Europe just made it that much better.


message 9: by Sharman (last edited Nov 06, 2014 10:31AM) (new)

Sharman Russell (sharmanaptrussell) | 212 comments Mod
I will add Sheila Turnage to my list! I certainly recognized Jo-Ann's favorites and loved them, too. I want and need to expand my list of 21rst century writers. I would recommend The Book Thief and The Absolutely True Story of a Part Time Indian and The Graveyard Book. But I need to go beyond those classics.


message 10: by Sharman (new)

Sharman Russell (sharmanaptrussell) | 212 comments Mod
Sharman wrote: "I will add Sheila Turnage to my list! I certainly recognized Jo-Ann's favorites and loved them, too. I want and need to expand my list of 21rst century writers. I would recommend The Book Thief and..."

I also thought Eleanor and Park was a very good book, and I am not naturally drawn to this plot. She just did it so well.Eleanor & Park


message 12: by Sharman (new)

Sharman Russell (sharmanaptrussell) | 212 comments Mod
Learning is the operative word! Next time I will use blank spaces between the links. A final comment before I check in tomorrow: I believe strongly in diversity in literature and in taste. There is room for all kinds of literature and all kinds of "taste" in this book club. We resonate as readers to a book. We are different and bring different things to that conversation between writer and reader. I know we will love and like and hate and dislike a variety and range of books. That's a given.


message 13: by Sharman (last edited Nov 06, 2014 10:35AM) (new)

Sharman Russell (sharmanaptrussell) | 212 comments Mod
P.S. I liked the first of the Hunger Games quite a bit. The others became less interesting, from a literary point of view (character, surprises, language) and the last was too action-packed. I sympathized with the author, though. It felt like she had the opportunity t create something special but was pulled in another direction, perhaps by pressures of success and money, constraints of time.


message 14: by Alisa (last edited Nov 06, 2014 09:28PM) (new)

Alisa (flywriter) | 5 comments I've been listening to more YA books on Audible lately, and Hugh Howey's Wool trilogy is totally addictive - it's about a post-apocalyptic world where the survivors live in underground silos with little or no reference to the past. I'm the odd duck who liked the second book the best, because it dealt with time shifts and cryogenics; most people favor the first and third in the trilogy (the second and third are arguably better written than the first, and feature a more engaging narrator).

The Girl With All the Gifts is a post-apocalyptic zombie read, which I normally avoid like the plague (pun, sorry), but the writing is superb, and the little savant zombie girl really should be up for adoption, because I'd keep her forever.

I've enjoyed catching up on a backlog of Neil Gaiman stories on audio (mostly available for free on Overdrive). Gaiman narrates almost all of them, and he's sensational. While The Graveyard Book is easily his best, Neverwhere is great for its fictive underworld and brilliant character development. As an aside, I first tried reading the e-book edition of Neverwhere from my library and gave up, but later, the audio version hooked me. I don't know what it is about certain stories that lend to being narrated rather than read, but I do love that a kind of modern oral tradition is enjoying a resurgence thanks to apps like Audible.


message 15: by Alisa (new)

Alisa (flywriter) | 5 comments One more - I adored Ready Player One. If you owned an Atari 2600, or your next-door neighbor did, you'll love this book. It's about a futuristic gamification culture, similar to the Matrix, where everyone is plugged in to the world virtually through games, and a huge treasure hunt is quickly underway. The author makes so many references to 80s music, video games, and culture that you won't want to put the book down lest the time-traveling spell be broken!


message 16: by Sharman (new)

Sharman Russell (sharmanaptrussell) | 212 comments Mod
The Girl with All the Gifts

I'm adding this title to the comments so I can remember to go give it a read. I also liked the Wool trilogy. So how should we proceed? Should we start reading a few books in common? Maybe I'll post a separate discussion for that.


message 17: by Shelley (new)

Shelley Muniz (shelleymuniz) | 21 comments My vote is to pick a title to start with and give everyone some time to read it -- then have a discussion.
Let's see how that works.


message 18: by Lorie (new)

Lorie Adair (goodreadscomuser_lorieadair) | 1 comments Great idea, Shelley.


message 19: by [deleted user] (new)

I loved The Hunger Games Trilogy and thought the Divergent Trilogy was only "okay". Right now I'm listening to the Beautiful Creatures series again (Kami Garcia and Margaret Stohl). I liked the Ruby Red Trilogy by Kirstin Gier and I look forward to delving into the books by Rick Riordan on my list.


message 20: by Lillian (new)

Lillian (trgllylibrarian) | 2 comments I just finished the Leviathan trilogy by Scott Westerfield (Leviathan, Behemoth, Goliath). It's a steampunk alternate-history story set in World War I, but the Germans and their allies operate giant mechanical walking war machines, and the British and their allies have genetically-fabricated living transports and war machines. The concepts were unique and very convincingly described. The romance was sweet as well.


message 21: by Shelley (new)

Shelley Muniz (shelleymuniz) | 21 comments Interesting when an author takes real life events and twists them. Has anyone read Red Moon by Benjamin Percy? Not young adult exactly, but could be -- cross-over? The werewolves are there...


message 22: by Sharman (new)

Sharman Russell (sharmanaptrussell) | 212 comments Mod
Alisa wrote: "I've been listening to more YA books on Audible lately, and Hugh Howey's Wool trilogy is totally addictive - it's about a post-apocalyptic world where the survivors live in underground silos with l..."

Yes, I just read and also liked Girl with All the Gifts quite a bit, but somehow I thought you had said it was a middle-grade book. And fairly soon, of course, as the army guys start cursing and wasting people, I thought--no. No.


message 23: by Sandy (new)

Sandy D. The last YA book I really loved was Scott Westerfeld's "Afterworlds".


message 24: by Sharman (new)

Sharman Russell (sharmanaptrussell) | 212 comments Mod
I will put that on my list! I did read and like some of the first Uglies of his.
Afterworlds


message 25: by Jamie (new)

Jamie (mixedreader) | 1 comments Currently reading Brown Girl Dreaming by Jacqueline Woodson and really enjoying it. Anyone else read it?


message 26: by Karen (new)

Karen Weiseman muller | 2 comments Out of all of the books listed the only ones I have read are the Hunger Games Trilogy. Although I have heard wonderful things about Eleanor and Park, and I have The Book Thief on my kindle waiting to be read. One of the books I really enjoyed reading recently was Sorta Like a Rockstar by Matthew Quick.


message 27: by Sharman (new)

Sharman Russell (sharmanaptrussell) | 212 comments Mod
Oh, good. Interesting new books to think about.

Sorta Like a Rock Star

Brown Girl Dreaming


message 28: by Shelley (new)

Shelley Muniz (shelleymuniz) | 21 comments Have not read these new mentions but they sound interesting.


message 29: by Angela (new)

Angela C | 8 comments I'm joining this thread pretty late, but two series I recently fell in love with are the Lumatere Chronicles by Melina Marchetta and The Red Rising trilogy by Pierce Brown. Both series are epic adventures with brilliant, heroic, wonderfully flawed characters.


message 30: by Sharman (new)

Sharman Russell (sharmanaptrussell) | 212 comments Mod
My list of books to read is getting longer!


message 31: by Julia (new)

Julia Flaherty | 14 comments My advice: don't overlook Rebecca Stead. She is a quiet talent with tons of literary recognition but probably not a forthcoming movie deal. I loved Liar & Spy, and also When You Reach Me.


message 32: by Sharman (new)

Sharman Russell (sharmanaptrussell) | 212 comments Mod
When You Reach me was pretty great, I agree. I'll have to try Liar and Spy. (Re movies...I was surprised to see How I Live Now had been made into a movie. I didn't have any interest in seeing it. The pleasure of that book was her voice, the way the author used language and even punctuation.)


message 33: by bjneary (new)

bjneary | 29 comments Sharman wrote: "Oh, good. Interesting new books to think about.

Sorta Like a Rock Star

Brown Girl Dreaming"


Angela wrote: "I'm joining this thread pretty late, but two series I recently fell in love with are the Lumatere Chronicles by Melina Marchetta and The Red Rising trilogy by Pierce Brown. Both series are epic adv..." I read all three books by Veronica Rossi- The Under the New Sky Trilogy and there was lots of romance, dystopian worlds, and adventure!

Sharman, I LOVED Sorta Like a Rock Star by Matthew Quick and I have been to see him speak twice! He is such a great author but I do have to say after reading all his books- Ambler Appleton is one of my favorite strong female protagonists. She always tried to help others, she was positive, empathetic, and a can do kind of girl!!!
I just finished reading Brown Girl Dreaming last week and I love Jacqueline Woodson books but her voice in this novel in verse was just beautiful. The strong sense of family, both in the North and the South, helped Jacqueline become the extraordinary writer, author and poet she has become. I enjoy novels in verse and her life in verse was mesmerizing. I hope she receives awards for this book!


message 34: by Julia (new)

Julia Flaherty | 14 comments Of Rebecca Stead's work, When You Reach Me has gotten more acclaim, but I actually like Liar and Spy better. There's no time travel or any supernatural component in it or anything, just a kid dealing with a lot of change in his life, coming up in the end with some great ways to handle things. What do you do in middle school if you're a little bit off-beat? It can be lonely, you know? I loved it.


message 35: by Sharman (new)

Sharman Russell (sharmanaptrussell) | 212 comments Mod
More good books to put on a list and read as soon as possible!


message 36: by Julia (new)

Julia | 11 comments Two that I've really loved this year that could be YA are Tooth and Claw by Jo Walton and Jackaby by William Ritter. They each take place in a different, unique 1880's.

The first is about inheritance, marriage, children, titles, birth order and dragons tell the story.

The second is a murder mystery with ghosts, shape shifters, banshees and a Sherlock Holmes- type.


message 37: by bjneary (new)

bjneary | 29 comments I have been participating in The Hub Morris/Nonfiction Challenge and really enjoyed The Story of Owen by E.K. Johnston The Story of Owen (Dragon Slayer of Trondheim, #1) by E.K. Johnston ---dragon slayer! and Gabi, a Girl in Pieces by Isabel Quintero Gabi, a Girl in Pieces by Isabel Quintero - a great female protagonist and The Scar Boys by Len Vlahos The Scar Boys by Len Vlahos - friendship and punk music. Try them!


message 38: by Sharman (new)

Sharman Russell (sharmanaptrussell) | 212 comments Mod
Thanks, Michael and bj. I am putting them on a list to take to the public library.


message 39: by Julia (new)

Julia Flaherty | 14 comments I'd forgotten about Tooth and Claw. That was such a fun read! It reminded me vividly of Jane Austen, but with dragons. Such a creative and unexpected mash-up. I wonder how Walton ever came up with the premise.


message 40: by Madly Jane (new)

Madly Jane (janieharrington) Well, I am reading a lot of YA right now. One fascinating book that I read, and I thought I would hate it, was The Coldest Girl in Coldtown by Holly Black. It's written really well, third person past tense, which is a plus for me. Right now I am overwhelmed by first person narratives. Also, the heroine of this VAMPIRE tale, has no special powers, which I loved. Girls with secret powers have overwhelmed me too. LOL. It's a road trip plot and it's really about something besides what's on the page. Very nasty vampires, too.


message 41: by Sharman (new)

Sharman Russell (sharmanaptrussell) | 212 comments Mod
These both sound great--Tooth and Claw and The Coldest Girl in Coldtown. I am in two book clubs and I may have to leave them since they are always having me read adult books. Kind of kidding about that. I probably won't leave them anytime soon. Still.


message 42: by Angela (new)

Angela C | 8 comments Melinda Jane, I'm so excited to see your mention of The Coldest Girl in Coldtown, as I recently read and loved it as well. I was torn between being fascinated and horrified for the entirety of the book...it was great! :-P I'm a big fan of vampire fiction, and The Coldest Girl in Coldtown was one of the best vampire books I've read in a while.


message 43: by Lauren (new)

Lauren Stoolfire I've just read The Girl from Felony Bay by J.E. Thompson and it's a fantastic MG mystery. If you like Nancy Drew you'll love Abbey Force. https://www.goodreads.com/review/show...


message 44: by bjneary (new)

bjneary | 29 comments Melinda Jane wrote: "Well, I am reading a lot of YA right now. One fascinating book that I read, and I thought I would hate it, was The Coldest Girl in Coldtown by Holly Black. It's written really well, third person pa..." I loved this book too, especially Tana and Gavriel, I love Holly Black! Very soon I will begin her newest, The Darkest Part of the Forest The Darkest Part of the Forest by Holly Black on my kindle and I am most excited to get reading another Holly Black book:)


message 45: by Mark (new)

Mark | 5 comments Andi wrote: "To be honest, I need some recommendations here.Like you, Shelley, I've read a lot of the series and enjoyed those, but for more serious YA, I don't know much, sadly. How I Live Now is going on my ..."

Not to overburden you, but here is a list of some of my favorites:

The Fault in Our Stars by John Green
Winger by Andrew Smith
I'll Give You the Sun by Jandy Nelson
Eleanor and Park by Rainbow Rowell
Please Ignore Vera Dietz by A.S. King

These books are all standalone, so they don't require weeks or your time to work through an entire series. They're also perhaps more "literary" YA, but I kind of hate that distinction. Happy reading!


message 46: by Alessandra (last edited Feb 18, 2015 10:27PM) (new)

Alessandra (chibisuke) I read the Lunar Chronicles this year which starts with Cinder. Totally loved it as it's a beautiful retelling of the old fairy tales in a futuristic world. The last book of the series will come out in autmn this year.
I also love Charlie Higsons The Enemy series which starts with The Enemy. It's title doesn't sound all promising and zombies never appealed to me before, but this YA series is just beautiful in it's own cruel way.
Otherwise I can highly recommend Patrick Nesss works. I've read A Monster Calls last year which is about relationships and how to deal with loosing someone important. I also loved The Knife of Never Letting Go.
Also Aristotle and Dante Discover the Secrets of the Universe, but Sharman already opened a thread for this so I might pop in there to leave my opinion.

I also read and loved The Book Thief and Eleanor and Park. I also read Fangirl by Rainbow Rowell which a lot of people loved, but I didn't enjoy it much. I still thought I would leave a link to it here as others might enjoy it.

I'm currently reading Jackaby by William Ritter and as Julia already said: A really great book which is YA, but doesn't feel like it at all. It's brilliant.

I think I could go on for hours as I mostly read YA.


message 47: by Sharman (new)

Sharman Russell (sharmanaptrussell) | 212 comments Mod
Thanks for all these good recommendations!


message 48: by Julia (new)

Julia | 11 comments Two more recommendations, but neither of them are YA, but both could be read by some teens.

My Real Children by Jo Walton My Real Children by Jo Walton , which is something like Life After Life by Kate Atkinson , only better because it has characters you want to read about!

The Shining Girls by Lauren Beukes The Shining Girls by Lauren Beukes is a murder mystery with a time traveling murderer.


message 49: by Nikki (new)

Nikki (nikkiarngwife) | 2 comments The most recent YA books I've read were Code Name Verity by Elizabeth Wein Code Name Verity (Code Name Verity, #1) by Elizabeth Wein which was pretty fantastic and A Cold Legacy by Megan Shepherd A Cold Legacy which was a big let down. I really enjoyed the first in this series but each book seemed to be a little worse.

Currently I am rereading The Princess Bride by William GoldmanThe Princess Bride and it's just as wonderful as always.

Other books I just finished are The Winter People by Jennifer McMahonThe Winter People which I enjoyed..it's a great creepy read and really perfect for anyone snowed in right now..it's cold here but no snow :)

also...The Little Stranger by Sarah WatersThe Little Stranger SO good.

I'm also working my way through The Outlander Series by Diana Gabaldon.

Right now I'm reading Dark Places by Gillian Flynn Dark Places and on audiobook I'm listening to The Wise Man's Fear by Patrick Rothfuss The Wise Man's Fear.


message 50: by bjneary (new)

bjneary | 29 comments Nikki wrote: "The most recent YA books I've read were Code Name Verity by Elizabeth Wein----I loved Rose Under Fire by E. Wein and I heard she has another book due out soon. I just finished readingAll the Bright Places by Jennifer Niven All the Bright Places by Jennifer Niven and I could not put it down and I loved the audiobook, Half Bad by Sally GreenHalf Bad (Half Bad, #1) by Sally Greenand I kept finding myself making time to listen to it!


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