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A Tale of Two Cities
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Charles Dickens Collection > A Tale of Two Cities - NO SPOILERS

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message 1: by Renato (new)

Renato (renatomrocha) This thread is for general discussion of our November 2014 Old School Read, A Tale of Two Cities by Charles Dickens. Please do not post spoilers in this thread.

Happy reading! :-)


message 2: by Tytti (new) - added it

Tytti | 1092 comments I had totally forgot this! I might join you a bit later, I didn't even have to look for my copy, much... Let's see how I feel about it after I finish the book I started today.


Philina | 1562 comments I've started listening to this as an audiobook, but so far I don't like it as much as Great Expectations.


Christine | 1217 comments I am excited to read this book! It will be a new one for me.


Emarosa89 | 6 comments Hey everybody! First time poster here! Not familiar with the format of these discussions, but hey how are ya?
Forgive me for not adding much vigor to the discussion, b/c my first post is really just a straightforward question.
I am just starting chapter V (wine shop). Is miss Manette's father also "The Doctor of Beauvais" orrr whats going on there?


Philina | 1562 comments I don't think we've got any format for posting...

Yeah, I guess he is this doctor. Lorry is trying to break the news on her in an easy way thus not getting directly to the point and later her father is referred to as Dr. Manette.


Emarosa89 | 6 comments Book 1 Chapter V The Wine Shop

Never read about the dire straits of the french people that precipitated the French Revolution. I mean the "hunger" that Dickens describes. Such a miserable life it must have been.

This Monsieur Defarge guy. He's intense. I'm not a 100% on what i think his motivations are in showing this Dr. Manette to other "Jacques". Or how how he came to shelter Manette in the first place. And who are these "Jacques" anyways? Are they part of something?

FYI if you struggle with a passage there is this spark-notes page that translates the entire novel into "modern english". Not something you should be reading as an alternative, just a supplementation for difficult passages if you find it necessary or would like some reassurance that you extracted the literal meaning from the original text. its: http://www.sparknotes.com/nofear/lit/...

I wouldn't say it has been hard so far, I have really only been tripped up on minor words that aren't in common use nowadays, I'd say I am getting used to Dickens' writing style, though. I will say that I like his use of humor. He sprinkles it in there, mercifully, as he doesn't shy away from the bleak misery of it all.

For instance: I really enjoyed the trudging up the hills by the mail with horses that didn't want to climb the hill, a coach that didn't think the horses COULD climb the hill, and passengers that had given up on the horses and decided to just walk along the cart, but didn't talk to each other because they were all suspicious. I mean that was supposed to be funny right? Because it made me laugh, I mean it was definitely like, aggressively pathetic.


message 8: by Renato (new)

Renato (renatomrocha) Just a quick reminder that this is the no spoilers thread. To post spoilers, use this topic. Thanks!


message 9: by [deleted user] (new)

An awesome book detailing the events leading up the Fr. Revolution and the Reign of Terror is Citizens: A Chronicle of the French Revolution by Solomon Northup. It's about 20 years old, but good books never die (that's why we have classics, eh?).


message 10: by Janet (last edited Nov 16, 2014 05:56PM) (new) - rated it 5 stars

Janet (goodreadscomjanetj) | 852 comments Dickens shows himself to be a master of satire in this book. Sarcasm seems to drip from his pen.


message 11: by Tytti (new) - added it

Tytti | 1092 comments I am trying to start this one this weekend. I just found my copy a bit more difficult to read, the font is smaller and old-fashioned, I think, and the paper is darker. It would be my first Dickens, I'm not that interested in his other books set in the 19th century England.


Emarosa89 | 6 comments I finished a few days ago. It is brilliant. The story is masterful. Wow.


Christine | 1217 comments Ugh, I haven't managed to start this one yet this month! I'm still determined to read it, but I think it might end up being a December read for me.


message 14: by Renato (new)

Renato (renatomrocha) Me neither... I don't know why I want to read so many books at the same time...!


Emarosa89 | 6 comments The way Dickens ties it all together in the end. Through the whole third book he makes full use of the Revolutionary setting to create some of the most meaningful characters and circumstances. To exemplify the extremes of human capacities, both good and evil. The nature of humans, and of the revolution, which is less of a human force for good or evil than a force of nature itself. The heroes of love that it forges are its only crowning jewels.


message 16: by Katy, New School Classics (new) - added it

Katy (kathy_h) | 9426 comments Mod
A Tale of Two Cities by Charles Dickens is our March 2018 Revisit the Shelf Reread.

This thread is for non-spoiler posts only.


message 17: by Katy, New School Classics (new) - added it

Katy (kathy_h) | 9426 comments Mod
Who is planning on joining us in the read this time around?


message 18: by Erin (new) - added it

Erin (erinm31) | 609 comments I plan to — I picked up a copy from the library just today! :)
I have read far too little by Charles Dickens — only A Christmas Carol so far — and must rectify this!


Jen from Quebec :0) (muppetbaby99) | 216 comments I am IN. I have this on Kindle AND Audible, yet I still long for a hard copy...--Jen from Quebec :0)


Christine | 1217 comments I won't have time for a reread this month, but I loved this book when I read it a few years ago. I highly recommend it!


message 21: by Katy, New School Classics (new) - added it

Katy (kathy_h) | 9426 comments Mod
This will be my first read for the book. Looking forward to it.


message 22: by Trinity (new)

Trinity | 3 comments :( I won't be reading. Just my opinion, but Charles Dickens is one of the most boring authors I have ever read.


Christine | 1217 comments Katy wrote: "This will be my first read for the book. Looking forward to it."

I hope you enjoy it!

For any audio book listeners, I really enjoyed the Tantor audio version of this book narrated by Simon Vance.


Christine | 1217 comments Trinity wrote: ":( I won't be reading. Just my opinion, but Charles Dickens is one of the most boring authors I have ever read."

Personal tastes are a funny thing! I hope one of the other group reads for this month is more to your liking. :-)


Candi (candih) | 765 comments I am reading it! This is the very first book I placed on my TBR when I joined Goodreads a few years ago! I'm ashamed to say, despite the fact I so desperately wanted to read it and owned a copy, that this will be my first time reading it, lol. I guess it got lost at the bottom of that gigantic pile of books that grew exponentially once joining GR.

I actually started this the other day and am enjoying it so far. It's the sort of book that I cannot read with distractions, so I may go through it slowly :)


Francisca | 368 comments I won't be rereading this month, but this is my favorite Dickens so I hope everyone enjoys it!


message 27: by Veronique (new) - added it

Veronique | 908 comments I’m going to try to join you. Hopefully, I can fit it :O)


message 28: by Katy, New School Classics (new) - added it

Katy (kathy_h) | 9426 comments Mod
Trinity wrote: ":( I won't be reading. Just my opinion, but Charles Dickens is one of the most boring authors I have ever read."

I happen to know that you are not alone


message 29: by Katy, New School Classics (new) - added it

Katy (kathy_h) | 9426 comments Mod
"It was the best of times, it was the worst of times..."

How did I not know that this is the book that famous line is from? Silly me. Better get reading.


Teresa | 1 comments I just starting reading it this morning and am really enjoying it! This is my first time reading it although I have owned this book for many years. That's what I get for being a book hoarder lol. So many books so little time!


Candi (candih) | 765 comments Katy wrote: ""It was the best of times, it was the worst of times..."

How did I not know that this is the book that famous line is from? Silly me. Better get reading."


I hadn't realized this either, Katy - or forgot about it somewhere along the way, lol!


message 32: by Katy, New School Classics (new) - added it

Katy (kathy_h) | 9426 comments Mod
Yes, one of the two for sure.


message 33: by Adina (new) - added it

Adina | 4 comments Katy wrote: ""It was the best of times, it was the worst of times..."

How did I not know that this is the book that famous line is from? Silly me. Better get reading."
I had the same reaction. I had no idea where this line came from.


message 34: by Adina (new) - added it

Adina | 4 comments I will be joining as well. I started the novel last month but paused because i was reading in the same time a book set in in about the same time period and location ( more or less 100 years :)) ) . It is my third Dickens. I finally got the courage to read the author two years ago with Great Expectation who got 5* from me and exceeded my expectations (which were not great). I thought the author was going to be boring and dated but no, I loved his writing.


Rosemarie | 1556 comments I reread A Tale of Two Cities many years after reading it in high school English class. The book was much better than I remembered. I hope you all enjoy it as much as I did.
Dickens tends to get better with each book you read, and he is good to begin with.


message 36: by Judy (new) - rated it 3 stars

Judy | 31 comments I have a secret reading list I call "books I read too young," and Tale of Two Cities is at the top of the list, in fact was one of my reading goals for 2018. So I was delighted to see it here. Now that I'm well into it, I can't believe I read it in junior high school. I hardly remember anything but do remember that it made a profound impression!


message 37: by Katy, New School Classics (new) - added it

Katy (kathy_h) | 9426 comments Mod
Adina wrote: "Katy wrote: ""It was the best of times, it was the worst of times..."

How did I not know that this is the book that famous line is from? Silly me. Better get reading." I had the same reaction. I ..."


Now I don’t feel so bad


message 38: by Jennifer (new) - added it

Jennifer (goodreadscomjenniferediting) | 34 comments I'm in for this one! I hope to start tonight. This will be my first time reading this book and only the second book I've read by Dickens. :(


Bat-Cat | 1299 comments I am also in on this one - I have already started and am currently at 7%. So far, although it is very different from the other Dickens books I have read, I am enjoying it. It took a bit to get into it though. I thought the beginning was so confusing that I went back and read it again - that made all the difference and I think I am going to like it. Anyway, looking forward to discussing with those of you who are also reading. :-)


message 40: by Katy, New School Classics (new) - added it

Katy (kathy_h) | 9426 comments Mod
Ten days into the month (or 1/3 of the way through); where are you in the book?


message 41: by Adina (new) - added it

Adina | 4 comments I just finished the first part. Whic is not much, I know. I read more than 1 book in the same time.


Bat-Cat | 1299 comments My reading has been slow lately - work has been busy and I have had a few seminars and trips to deal with. Hopefully I will make more significant progress in the next week or so. :-)

On a different note, I just got back from San Antonio, having been there for a couple of days, and, as my husband and I were stepping out of the elevator at the hotel, I almost walked straight into Margaret Atwood. After the encounter I just stood there dazed and my husband asked if I was okay. I finally got the words out, "That was Margaret Atwood who just got in the elevator!". He, of course, didn't share my excitement not even knowing who she is. I was star struck, went immediately to a local bookstore, bought a hard copy of The Handmaid's Tale and kept it in my purse for the entire next day. I never saw her again and I was told that she had checked out early the next morning. It's amazing to me how excited I got - probably like people get when they see a rock star. ;-)


Laurie | 1630 comments Bat-Cat wrote: "My reading has been slow lately - work has been busy and I have had a few seminars and trips to deal with. Hopefully I will make more significant progress in the next week or so. :-)

On a differe..."


Very cool to see Margaret Atwood. I would have been starstruck too.


Candi (candih) | 765 comments Katy wrote: "Ten days into the month (or 1/3 of the way through); where are you in the book?"

I have read through Book 2. I decided to take a break from it for a few days and catch up on some other committed reads for the month. I will get back to it likely this coming week. Last year at this time, I was immersed in Les Misérables - one of the most phenomenal books I've ever read. Unfortunately, as that one is so fresh in my mind yet, I am finding myself making comparisons between that one and this Dickens' work. This one is good, but pales in comparison. I just don't feel the emotional tug here. The depth of characterization. It seems that we are just touching on the surface. I will most certainly continue with it, and am actually quite interested to see what transpires in Book 3.


message 45: by Candi (last edited Mar 11, 2018 07:15AM) (new) - rated it 4 stars

Candi (candih) | 765 comments Bat-Cat, what a fantastic sighting!! Funny about your husband; mine would have been clueless as well, lol. I love that you went out and purchased an Atwood book and carried it around with you - I likely would have done similarly :)


message 46: by Patrick (last edited Mar 11, 2018 08:03AM) (new) - rated it 5 stars

Patrick Bat-Cat wrote: "My reading has been slow lately - work has been busy and I have had a few seminars and trips to deal with. Hopefully I will make more significant progress in the next week or so. :-)

On a differe..."


That is a great story. I would have been gobsmacked, too! And I am one man who would have recognized her instantly. 🙂


message 47: by Jennifer (new) - added it

Jennifer (goodreadscomjenniferediting) | 34 comments Adina wrote: "I just finished the first part. Whic is not much, I know. I read more than 1 book in the same time."

I'm not far into the second book. Like Adina, I have a few books going at once.

The first book was a little slow going, but the second book definitely hooked me. I'm curious to see where this is going.


message 48: by Judy (new) - rated it 3 stars

Judy | 31 comments Katy wrote: "Ten days into the month (or 1/3 of the way through); where are you in the book?"

I have just finished Book 2, and am leaving for a week's vacation where this will be my bedtime reading. Hope I'll be able to sleep! I read this long, long ago but don't remember it at all except for the impression of turmoil and horror. Dickens really lays it on, doesn't he?


Bat-Cat | 1299 comments Laurie wrote: "Bat-Cat wrote: "My reading has been slow lately - work has been busy and I have had a few seminars and trips to deal with. Hopefully I will make more significant progress in the next week or so. :-..."

;-)


Bat-Cat | 1299 comments Candi wrote: "Bat-Cat, what a fantastic sighting!! Funny about your husband; mine would have been clueless as well, lol. I love that you went out and purchased an Atwood book and carried it around with you - I l..."

I guess, to each her own. Even after 20 years of marriage I am still amazed that my interests have not been totally absorbed into his psyche. ;-)

I did feel like a bit of a stalker but I was determined not to miss the opportunity should it present itself again... so I HAD to get a book.


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