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Agnes Grey > Week 3: Chapters 13-18

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message 1: by Anastasia Kinderman, The Only (last edited Oct 31, 2014 08:55AM) (new)

Anastasia Kinderman | 654 comments Mod
We will discuss chapters 13-18 here.


message 2: by Anastasia Kinderman, The Only (new)

Anastasia Kinderman | 654 comments Mod
Rosalie's actions here made me shake my head. What a conceited, silly girl!


Andrea AKA Catsos Person (catsosperson) | 315 comments The only things that I can say about these chapters is that Rosalie is just odious.

However, I am enjoying the book.


Helen_in_the_uk Rosalie is a very spoilt, selfish young lady but her upbringing (at the request of her parents) has encouraged that. The two Murray sisters are not educated about anything that requires effort on their part, they don't like to undertake the 'difficult' parts of painting or needlework, they aren't taught to be useful (note Miss Matilda's attempts to cope with tea tray alone in chapter 12). They are apparently being raised with one purpose in mind - catch a good husband and (presumably) breed to produced the next generation. It doesn't seem to matter if they like/love the men in question or if they are compatible. They are products of the time/class they were born into.


Andrea AKA Catsos Person (catsosperson) | 315 comments Well said Helen.


Andrea AKA Catsos Person (catsosperson) | 315 comments Perhaps the overriding message or theme of this book is the frightening deficiencies, neglect and moral bankruptcy of upper class parenting for the author's time (Victorian Period?).


message 7: by Anastasia Kinderman, The Only (new)

Anastasia Kinderman | 654 comments Mod
Andrea (Catsos Person) wrote: "Perhaps the overriding message or theme of this book is the frightening deficiencies, neglect and moral bankruptcy of upper class parenting for the author's time (Victorian Period?)."

I believe at the time it was written, awareness of how governesses were treated by their families was being raised and the upper class was coming under fire. Some of what is written about in this book was based on Anne's own experiences.


message 8: by Lisa (new)

Lisa (lisadannatt) | 304 comments Helen, you read my mind.
There's so little emphasis placed on parental upbringing, blame is shifted to the governess, the teacher, the doctor etc; both then and in today's world.

Mr Weston is a sweet character. Very unusual in a Bronte hero...


message 9: by Anastasia Kinderman, The Only (new)

Anastasia Kinderman | 654 comments Mod
An interesting tidbit, my Tante was a nanny (in Italy, France (I think), and the U.S.) and she refused to work for anyone who wouldn't give her authority over the children and back up what she said. She'd tell me stories about how badly behaved the children would be around the parents and sometimes she'd have to train the parents to not give in!

That's a more modern day experience, I was thinking of her as I read this book.


message 10: by Lisa (new)

Lisa (lisadannatt) | 304 comments Kind of like Supernanny?
Sounds good though, how can you raise children with no authority?


message 11: by Anastasia Kinderman, The Only (new)

Anastasia Kinderman | 654 comments Mod
Lisa wrote: "Kind of like Supernanny?
Sounds good though, how can you raise children with no authority?"


Kind of. She was more long-term though, kinda like Agnes.

My Tante worked for, I think, one family where the parents wouldn't let her tell the children what to do. And if she did they wouldn't back her up. That didn't last long, haha.


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