The Slow Regard of Silent Things (The Kingkiller Chronicle, #2.5) The Slow Regard of Silent Things discussion


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Mental Illness as a beautiful thing .

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Gandalfgrijs I agree half with you. Mental illness is no beautiful thing, day 3 and 4 probably maked that clear. I think Auri would have been happier if she didn't have a mental illness.
However, I think this book shows very well that if you have a mental illness, your life isn't over, isn't worthless, isn't always dark. You can even find strenghts and ways to go on within it.
But well, hapilly, I'm no expert.


message 2: by [deleted user] (last edited Oct 31, 2014 05:30PM) (new)

Tolkien, Lucas, and JK Rowling never had to tell people that they had to be especially broken or "special snowflake" people to like their stories/books. It's baffling he's categorizing his fans like this as if to create a sense of insecurity in us about honestly critiquing the shortcomings of the story. It's like there's an attempt being made at creating a demographic of fan he feels comfortable with reading his book. The Demographic is epic fantasy and he well knows it.

It is my belief that an epic fantasy Author who apologizes for his work knows deep down inside there is a voice called his conscience he is not listening to ......That voice or instinct is the part of himself that once had a taste for what he was doing. The part of him that knew he was making a huge mistake releasing this book.

Don't get me wrong........a very good attempt at making a silk purse out of a sow's ear was made here, but no matter how poetic, it's still a sow's ear.

Even with the apology and excuses I would diplomatically suggest.....

When you claim to have written a 3 book series of epic fantasy and you have released 2 of those books, you have set up the expectations of your epic fantasy fans yourself for book 3. It comes off especially pretentious to explain away that expectation by writing in comments by friends who defend the letdown of that expectation in the last chapter of the disappointing book, itself.

I've never heard of any author doing this so there is no precedent.

But say somehow you didn't think "The Slow Regard of Silent things" had anything to do with book 3 prior to reading it....

A decent human being would know his fans were buying his book because they liked the previous works. Heck, I would have been satisfied simply getting some good background story about Auri and some insight into the part she is playing in the KKC. Or, just something about why she ended up where she did......Was she the Princess rescued from the Barrow King? A Fae? But, that wasn't the case....I still don't have a clue about those aspects of her character. I paid 10 bucks andI got her finding things and making soap and I really know nothing more about her character than I did previously. Nothing.

The only justice I perceive for this gross disrespect of my time and money is the entertainment value I get from calling out what I believe to be a hack author.

And............I was a fan. I told people who got me into fantasy and sci fi, ......."hey you should check this Rothfuss guy out." I compared him to the best. I believe the utter deflation here will be legend amongst a certain group of fantasy fans.

Maybe not the "specials".

But according to Amazon, 1 of every 3 people who were big enough fans to buy the book in the first few days are willing to be characterized as un-special and accept the ridicule of their un-specialness. 1 out of every 3. It's only a matter of time before a certain percentage of the specials, after introspection, admit they feel duped and reveal they simply wanted to be included in the Author's special snowflake group fan club.

Ultimately, absolutely everyone will know they are duped in a few years....when book 3 never comes to fruition, or it reveals itself to be another lazy poetic brain fart.

The ultimate proof of my estimation. I think we all see it coming.


Kevin @Tsmith20

You have put into words exactly what I have been thinking these past couple of days.


idcboobs Sara wrote: "Tsmith20 wrote: "Tolkien, Lucas, and JK Rowling never had to tell people that they had to be especially broken or "special snowflake" people to like their stories/books. It's baffling he's categor..."

what about when an author makes a promise to release an already written series at yearly intervals before the first book is even released?

because if i remember correctly, the second book took 2-3 years to release and the third book has had it's date pushed back from early 2012 to 2013 to 2014 and now who knows when.

So yeah i think it's fair for the consumers to complain about what is written, some of us actually do deserve to expect something out of a book, especially when that book is a 150 page novella, for $10, probably written in less than a month, which is replacing the release date for book 3, which has been finished for seven years, which has had its date pushed back constantly.

Get off your high horse Sara, you're exactly the person nobody wants to be; the person that feels the need to deliver excuses for people who don't give two shits about you.

If the author is making excuses in the back of a novel to attempt to apologize for basically giving the readers a completely blown up, money making scam, then i don't think he needs you to tell other reader to go fuck themselves, we read the same book and i'm pretty sure the exact point of a site for reviewing books is to allow people to give feedback, if you dislike a stranger's feedback, what you should do is ignore that feedback since that person paid the exact same for the book as you did. What you shouldn't do is chastise people because they expected something real.


Good work by the way; you gave 5 stars to a 150 page book about a character who already had a developed personality from previous books, i'm sure your opinion wasn't biased at all seeing as how quickly you run to defend a shitty author.


message 5: by [deleted user] (last edited Nov 01, 2014 01:58PM) (new)

I forgive you.

If fans really read "The Kingkiller Chronicles" to enjoy the dynamics of a peripheral mentally challenged character's grinning habits, far be it of me to interrupt unequivocally.

My comments on her mental illness. I have no idea. I don't think that was even laid out convincingly. Maybe she was, maybe she wasn't.......considering.

Let me put it this way. If she had a good reason to be hiding then she's not mentally ill. I figured for my 10 bucks, I'd be able to answer the question of why she was there under the school, but that isn't the case. I'm pretty sure most of us thought that, at the very least this small nugget would be revealed.

Or maybe if she's really some kind of fae......then she's not mentally ill either. Again, no answer for my 10 bucks. I honestly don't really even care to invest any additional time and money to finding out. One tremendous let down is one too many. There's too much other stuff out there with more potential competing for my attention.

I'll tell you what I did get for my 10 bucks. A lengthy discussion on the quality of mental illness on a character that I can't even tell if is, in fact, mentally ill.

Not quite where I was after reading any JK Rowling, or JRR Tolkien book. Rothfuss has been relegated to the B drawer of almost was's of fantasy literature. I'm going back on the prowl for an author who writes material that is actually worth my time.


message 6: by [deleted user] (last edited Nov 01, 2014 07:18PM) (new)

....wow, I'm not sure if I should have accepted that apology now.......I've read them. This is in the ballpark of "Unfinished tails of Numenor". I don't complain about "Unfinished tails" though because honestly, I knew what it was when I got it and it wasn't sold with the old (bait and switch) that Rothfuss has put on us with this heaping pile.

I've read the major stuff more than once. JK Rowling, Tolkien's LOTR, Hobbit, the list goes on. I'm not sure who would make that kind of thing up.
I usually don't even go around admitting that kind of thing.

The reason I mention these authors specifically is to help others reflect upon the true "epic" fantasy authors who are tried and tested, proven, if you will. Then compare the experience of reading this tale to those.

I suppose I have a bit of knowledge about what goes into writing a story, professionally. I kind of think someone pressured him into releasing this book. This story is the kind of thing a writer would write to help himself understand his character a little better, but never to release it. Especially in place of book 3 in a series that has been promised.

Oh, and I remember the big yarn about the "Rogue" series, etc. I'm not buying it. This is all a carefully crafted story by Rothfuss so our expectations about book 3 and his previous promises to us are deflected. You don't put apologies in forwards and excuses in the last chapter of a book to rectify ripping off your fans. You simply refund their money. We don't see that offer on the table though do we?

This all just reeks of someone trying to get a big bonus check for Christmas. Rothfuss was probably forwarded money years ago with the expectation of the 3 book series, and when he didn't have it delivered he panicked and polished up this turd in its place.

It really leaves a sour taste in my mouth and honestly, gets a rise out of me, knowing the expectation from these Publisher's and Rothfuss is that we the fans are going to buy all this baloney hook, line, and sinker. It's all a big load of bull, so they can get paid in time for Christmas and they know it.

Rothfuss even stated that he knew this story didn't have the trappings of "what a story is supposed" to have. The amount of apologetic nonsense this guy has put out all but seals the deal with his own inner turmoil and guilt about doing this to us. He may not be able to help that he slacked off and couldn't live up to the expectations of his publisher. But, the right thing to do is admit that fault, not sell a turd to his fans with a bunch of apologetic "special" nonsense.

I'm just agreeing with him. It doesn't have what a good story is supposed to have. There's a reason those rules exist and when you don't follow them, you get disappointed fans. Some of those fans will call you out for your BS too.

I'm not sure what the real story is behind "The Slow Regard of Silent Things". It's the kind of thing we'll find out 20 years from now in some "Where are they now?" episode for fantasy authors on VH1.

Or, maybe just maybe, Rothfuss and his publisher will feel the sting of losing a huge portion of his fans and make up for it somehow by getting book 3 finished, quickly. Then, those like me who won't buy it.............will at least hear about it from people like you who stuck around to read it.


Gandalfgrijs First of all, you have been posting this in every topic about the book, who were all not related to the question if you liked the book.
So even if you think it is stupid to discus every single detail in the book, let us do it. If you want to discuss something, make a new topic?
That said, I'll comment in here on your previous post, since here is where the discussion is. Later on the day I"ll comment on the mental illnes thing.

That said: I disagree with you. I know that every human being is entiteled to his own opinion and that is fine. If you say this book is a waste of you money, it probably is, because you're the judge here. I've enough books which were a waste of my money, but ohter people loved them. That doesn't make them bad books, just bad books for me.

But to say, that the author tricked you into buying this book, is, sorry, but complete rubbish.
The first page, it said that you didn't want to buy this book, because it was no continuation on the kingkiller chronicles, that means you could also have read book three without reading this book. That means that one of the first things he told you, was that you wouldn't find out anything big. I think that was your first complaint.
And sure, you can be pissed of that it was no continuation, but he warned you.

The second thing he said was that it wasn't a normal story, it didn't have anything like a normal story. Tolkien, Lucas, enz (and if you said you read them, that's enough proof for me that you did), are all amazing writers, but that doesn't mean that all the books in the world will have to be excactly the same. And again, you're free to dislike that.

And about getting in the details with her mental illnes and her grinning, I like it. If Pat said he had gone over it 80 times (and there is no reason for me to believe that he didn't), he has tended to a lot of details. The plotlines of book three already excist, so there are probably a few hints to it. The devil is in the details, as the saying goes.

I hope I didn't insult you in anyway, because that wasn't my design. I also hope that I maked my opinion clear.


idcboobs Gandalfgrijs wrote: "First of all, you have been posting this in every topic about the book, who were all not related to the question if you liked the book.
So even if you think it is stupid to discus every single deta..."


First off yes, the author actually did trick people into buying the first book, i only bought the book because it was apparently finished and going to be released quickly over three years

"First-time novelist Patrick Rothfuss offers self-aware heroic fantasy in The Name of the Wind, the first volume in a trilogy (which is already completely written) about the life and legend of Kvothe, master magician, musician, thief, assassin and hero"

"The next two books will come out in one-year intervals. I'm able to do this because when I started writing, I had no idea how long a book was. I just kept blazing a trail until I came to the end of Kvothe's story. When I finally finished, I looked back and realized I had a trilogy's worth of material."

http://www.patrickrothfuss.com/conten...

Second, you're right it wasn't a normal story, it was nothing. The book had no value whatsoever, it told us nothing we already didn't know about the character, in some cases it actually made the character less interesting. The novella was a complete waste of time.

Third, the grinning thing, you say that Pat tends to a lot of detail, if you think repeating the word "grin" is poetic or some sort of sad yet happy teenage girl thing then that's you, i find it to be obnoxious, it's how people write in high school when they have that mentality of "oh it's actually a pretty deep story". Not it isn't, Auri grinning doesn't mean anything to me, it's the only cheap, "subtle" way the author could make the 150 page book seem anything like a sad slow novel worth anything near $10


Gandalfgrijs I didn't mean Name of the Wind, but the Slow Regard of Silent Things. I begun two years ago with the Name of the Wind and I have no idea what the release schedule was, but it is indeed a tad lax of him to make that promise, but it that interview was seven years ago, there could have happened a lot. I heard he had to rewrite them, but that was official source, so that doesn't reall count.

Your second thing that's your opinion. I don't agree with it, but that's fine.

Well, I didn't notice the grinning thing untill goodreads pointed that out, but the other things depends on how you read. I, apparently, read as a teenage girl, a lot of people are reading as teenage girls. No problem. Just let us read as teenage girls.


idcboobs Gandalfgrijs wrote: "I didn't mean Name of the Wind, but the Slow Regard of Silent Things. I begun two years ago with the Name of the Wind and I have no idea what the release schedule was, but it is indeed a tad lax of..."

Fair enough, thanks for being so polite about this


Twerking To Beethoven Tsmith20 wrote: "Tolkien, Lucas, and JK Rowling never had to tell people that they had to be especially broken or "special snowflake" people to like their stories/books. It's baffling he's categorizing his fans li..."

Very well put. My hat's off to you.


message 12: by [deleted user] (last edited Nov 02, 2014 11:32AM) (new)

I'm going to refrain from reiterating previous ideas I've expressed ad nauseam and get back to the interesting aspects of Auri's mental disorder. Which one does she have?
It's so difficult to ascertain its beauty without a clear diagnosis.

Cluster A:

Schizoid Personality Disorder. Schizoid personalities are introverted, withdrawn, solitary, emotionally cold, and distant. They are often absorbed with their own thoughts and feelings and are fearful of closeness and intimacy with others. For example, a person suffering from schizoid personality is more of a daydreamer than a practical action taker.

Paranoid Personality Disorder. The essential feature for this type of personality disorder is interpreting the actions of others as deliberately threatening or demeaning. People with paranoid personality disorder are untrusting, unforgiving, and prone to angry or aggressive outbursts without justification because they perceive others as unfaithful, disloyal, condescending or deceitful. This type of person may also be jealous, guarded, secretive, and scheming, and may appear to be emotionally “cold” or excessively serious.

Schizotypal Personality Disorder. A pattern of peculiarities best describes those with schizotypal personality disorder. People may have odd or eccentric manners of speaking or dressing. Strange, outlandish or paranoid beliefs and thoughts are common. People with schizotypal personality disorder have difficulties forming relationships and experience extreme anxiety in social situations. They may react inappropriately or not react at all during a conversation or they may talk to themselves. They also display signs of “magical thinking” by saying they can see into the future or read other people’s minds.

Cluster B:

Antisocial Personality Disorder. People with antisocial personality disorder characteristically act out their conflicts and ignore normal rules of social behavior. These individuals are impulsive, irresponsible, and callous. Typically, the antisocial personality has a history of legal difficulties, belligerent and irresponsible behavior, aggressive and even violent relationships. They show no respect for other people and feel no remorse about the effects of their behavior on others. These people ware at high risk for substance abuse, especially alcoholism, since it helps them to relieve tension, irritability and boredom.

Borderline Personality Disorder. People with borderline personality disorder are unstable in several areas, including interpersonal relationships, behavior, mood, and self-image. Abrupt and extreme mood changes, stormy interpersonal relationships, an unstable and fluctuating self-image, unpredictable and self-destructive actions characterize the person with borderline personality disorder. These individuals generally have great difficulty with their own sense of identity. They often experience the world in extremes, viewing others as either “all good” or “all bad.” A person with borderline personality may form an intense personal attachment with someone only to quickly dissolve it over a perceived slight. Fears of abandonment may lead to an excessive dependency on others. Self-multilation or recurrent suicidal gestures may be used to get attention or manipulate others. Impulsive actions, chronic feelings of boredom or emptiness, and bouts of intense inappropriate anger are other traits of this disorder, which is more common among females.

Narcissistic Personality Disorder. People with narcissistic personality have an exaggerated sense of self-importance, are absorbed by fantasies of unlimited success, and seek constant attention. The narcissistic personality is oversensitive to failure and often complains of multiple somatic symptoms. Prone to extreme mood swings between self-admiration and insecurity, these people tend to exploit interpersonal relationships.
Cluster C:

Avoidant Personality Disorder. Avoidant personalities are often hypersensitive to rejection and are unwilling to become involved with others unless they are sure of being liked. Excessive social discomfort, timidity, fear of criticism, avoidance of social or work activities that involve interpersonal contact are characteristic of the avoidant personality. They are fearful of saying something considered foolish by others; worry they will blush or cry in front of others; and are very hurt by any disapproval by others. People with avoidant personality disorder may have no close relationships outside of their family circle, although they would like to, and are upset at their inability to relate well to others.

Dependent Personality Disorder. People with dependent personality disorder may exhibit a pattern of dependent and submissive behavior, relying on others to make decisions for them. They require excessive reassurance and advice, and are easily hurt by criticism or disapproval. They feel uncomfortable and helpless if they are alone, and can be devastated when a close relationship ends. They have a strong fear of rejection. Typically lacking in self-confidence, the dependent personality rarely initiates projects or does things independently. This disorder usually begins by early adulthood and is diagnosed more frequently in females than males.

Obsessive-Compulsive Personality Disorder. Compulsive personalities are conscientious and have high levels of aspiration, but they also strive for perfection. Never satisfied with their achievements, people with compulsive personality disorder take on more and more responsibilities. They are reliable, dependable, orderly, and methodical, but their inflexibility often makes them incapable of adapting to changed circumstances. People with compulsive personality are highly cautious, weigh all aspects of a problem, and pay attention to every detail, making it difficult for them to make decisions and complete tasks. When their feelings are not under strict control, events are unpredictable, or they must rely on others, compulsive personalities often feel a sense of isolation and helplessness.


Mothwing Sara wrote: "Mental Illness as a beautiful thing"

Yeah... let's not romanticise. It can certainly lend an emphasis to mundane events that others would overlook and add focus to them and disclose their beauty, but that also works in the reverse for everything else.

(While it did turn me into a meticulously hard worker and analytical thinker I certainly didn't see the beauty of my depression when I or two of my closest friends tried to commit suicide or when one had a psychotic episode and attacked her family with a knife.)

I agree with Gandalfgrijs, Auri obviously manages on her own, but I doubt that she wouldn't be happier if she wasn't mentally ill.


Twerking To Beethoven Fohgetdatshit wrote: "OR ASK PAT ROTHFUSS 2014 "THE SLOW REGARD OF SILENT THINGS", REMEMBER? WENT FULL RETARD, COMPLETELY RUINED THE KINGKILLER CHRONICLES! "

Uberlulz. So true.


message 15: by Marc (last edited Nov 06, 2014 07:22AM) (new) - rated it 2 stars

Marc Jones Twerking wrote: "Fohgetdatshit wrote: "OR ASK PAT ROTHFUSS 2014 "THE SLOW REGARD OF SILENT THINGS", REMEMBER? WENT FULL RETARD, COMPLETELY RUINED THE KINGKILLER CHRONICLES! "

Uberlulz. So true."


Anyone who thinks OCD is a beautiful thing should watch my wife eat a big bag of skittles.
They whole process is
*empty the bag
*arrange skittles into color
*get the colored piles into equal amounts (i eat the extras)
*arrange the piles into a clockwise pattern which always goes Orange, yellow, red, purple, green)
*moving in a clockwise direction eating them one at a time
thats just the system for classic skittles,we had to adapt for limted edition blues....which she settled on having me just eat the blue ones).

Goes without saying she cant eat sweets at the cinema, section eats all meals and occasionally suffers paranoia towards odd numbers.
She got pregnant recently and had to come off her meds....things have been interesting to say the least and not in the slightest as "cute and kooky" as people would imagine.


Twerking To Beethoven Oh mate, I'm sorry to hear that.


message 17: by Marc (last edited Nov 06, 2014 07:54AM) (new) - rated it 2 stars

Marc Jones Twerking wrote: "Oh mate, I'm sorry to hear that."

Nothing you should feel sorry bout since its nothing you did or knew about, Me and Bex have been together for years and we've always managed with it, sadly the loss of our first child left her with depression. The depression made her OCD worse which in turn lead to anxiety and panic attacks.
I accepted long ago I had to live in her world of order, rules and systems within systems but I have managed to make inroads to breaking her cycles.
Im pretty certain that if you were to tell Becky that her condition is a beautiful thing her reaction would to smack you in the face THEN explain exactly why your wrong.


Twerking To Beethoven Marc wrote: "Im pretty certain that if you were to tell Becky that her condition is a beautiful thing her reaction would to smack you in the face THEN explain exactly why your wrong."

And rightly so.


message 19: by Marc (last edited Nov 06, 2014 08:06AM) (new) - rated it 2 stars

Marc Jones Twerking wrote: "Marc wrote: "Im pretty certain that if you were to tell Becky that her condition is a beautiful thing her reaction would to smack you in the face THEN explain exactly why your wrong."

And rightly so."


I suppose you can find beauty in a battlefield.....but then again you wouldn't want to be in it and you probably shouldn't tell a bunch of veterans how lucky they were to experience it first hand.


Twerking To Beethoven Marc and Fohgetdatshit (sweet nickname, by the way), I have nothing but sheer respect for you two. For different reasons, that is. Sheer respect anyway.


message 21: by Marc (new) - rated it 2 stars

Marc Jones Twerking wrote: "Marc and Fohgetdatshit (sweet nickname, by the way), I have nothing but sheer respect for you two. For different reasons, that is. Sheer respect anyway."

Looks like sara removed her opening comment.
I would actually be pretty interested to see if it was due to reconsidering her position or fear of a flame war.


idcboobs pretty cool how after all the hate and negative stuff I got for my "review" of this novella, the release of the novella itself really started getting people annoyed with Rothfuss.

Don't wanna sound like a hipster but i hated him first


Twerking To Beethoven Idcboobs wrote: "Don't wanna sound like a hipster but i hated him first"

I laughed. :-)


message 24: by Marc (new) - rated it 2 stars

Marc Jones Twerking wrote: "Idcboobs wrote: "Don't wanna sound like a hipster but i hated him first"

I laughed. :-)"


Sorry Idcboobs your way behind Robert Stanek......UNLESS IDCBOOBS IS STANEK ! which may explain a lot :)


idcboobs Fohgetdatshit wrote: "Well, it's not too surprising, especially since Rothfuss devoted the beginning and ending chapters of his book to winning over the Twilight/Hunger Games teenage angst ridden tween girl fans, that h..."

so true, the tired trope of the beautifully, tragic, "broken" girl is so over done and is such a reach for a wider fan base in my opinion. The fact it's so obvious too, he had so much potential for auri, so many theories on who she could be and he just threw them away for the chance at a larger audience.

I am cringing at the amount of 5 star ratings the book is getting and literally ever good review says the same thing "such a beautiful tale of a mysterious young girl" or some shit, it's disgusting to me, do these people think they'll get early access for telling a fantasy author that his lack of fantasy was magical and innovative


idcboobs Fohgetdatshit wrote: "Yeah, not holding Rothfuss to his word is the worst thing anyone could do, and they don't even know it. If this book does well enough, they'll do more like it. When these author's get sucked into ..."

where were you half a year ago when people kept denying this shit on my review

you should check out the earliest comments, people actually out right denied it was happening and now this novella is literal proof


Mike I would say that Auri doesn't suffer from any illness. If anything she sees things more clearly than any other and as such acts appropriately. As if a certain portion of her mind has been liberated and the rest of the population views her actions, thoughts etc as odd simply because their minds are closed where hers is open and people easily confuse genius with instability.


message 28: by Marc (last edited Nov 08, 2014 01:50PM) (new) - rated it 2 stars

Marc Jones Mike wrote: "I would say that Auri doesn't suffer from any illness. If anything she sees things more clearly than any other and as such acts appropriately. As if a certain portion of her mind has been liberated..."

Shes clearly mentally ill. Just look at days 3 and 4.
Unless were going with manic depression being something positive that were all missing out on.


idcboobs Mike wrote: "I would say that Auri doesn't suffer from any illness. If anything she sees things more clearly than any other and as such acts appropriately. As if a certain portion of her mind has been liberated..."

I really dislike this way of thinking, it disregards actual problems of mental illness within the world in substitute for a way of thinking that mainly states "she's special in her own ways".

Nah man, she's mentally ill, it's a real illness, disregarding it won't make her unique, and i highly doubt anyone with mental illnesses enjoys being called unique


Twerking To Beethoven Well, there's still hope out there. The average rating of TSRoST was 4.16 a couple of days ago. It's 4.12 today.


message 31: by Marc (last edited Nov 09, 2014 05:53AM) (new) - rated it 2 stars

Marc Jones Idcboobs wrote: "Mike wrote: "I would say that Auri doesn't suffer from any illness. If anything she sees things more clearly than any other and as such acts appropriately. As if a certain portion of her mind has b..."

I hear when u loose one sense the rest get sharper and sometimes you even develop extra senses.
I heard it from an idiot.


Gyuri Lakatos I kind of think that Patrick ruined this for himself with his excuses in fore- and afterwords. An author should take the responsibility for his work and not make up excuses for the case some people happen to not like or understand the book.
Somehow in the first and second book nobody mentioned/complained anything about the mental illnesses. As for myself, i never thought about it until the afterword. I simply took Auris character as it was. She was cute and weird and mysterious. It worked for me. It would have been nice to know some of her past perhaps, but if not for the afterword a never would have gone so far as to philosophize about mental illnesses.
I think that this whole book is over-hyped and many comments are overreacting (both lovers and haters).
People forget that everyone has a right for an opinion and that does not have to be the same. There is no point in going to war to try to force a different opinion on someone.


message 33: by Marc (new) - rated it 2 stars

Marc Jones Gyuri wrote: "I kind of think that Patrick ruined this for himself with his excuses in fore- and afterwords. An author should take the responsibility for his work and not make up excuses for the case some people..."

Just thought I worth point out I have no problem with Pat having Auri be mentally ill. I have no problem with ANYONE writing a mentally ill character. I dont even have a problem with someone trying and failing at mental ill character. I think I'm just going to try and pretend this book didnt happen and have Auri remain the way I saw her in the first two books.

My problem with people who post topics about mental illness as a beautiful thing or how sufferers see the world more clearly than others.
I wouldn't really wish one of my "black days" on anyone .


Gyuri Lakatos Marc ...and you are right in everything.

What i was trying to say with my comment is that this whole discussion is caused by mainly a poorly thought through afterword and maybe misinterpretation and harsh conclusions.

If i offended someone with this im really sorry, it was not my intention.


message 35: by Marc (new) - rated it 2 stars

Marc Jones Gyuri wrote: "Marc ...and you are right in everything.

What i was trying to say with my comment is that this whole discussion is caused by mainly a poorly thought through afterword and maybe misinterpretation a..."


No offence taken from me and I agree with your what u said in your first post.

But yeah the afterword pissed me off it bit.
I think the foreword actually managed to go a long way to lower my expectations.


Kerry Much too complex interpretation. Two alternates:

One. It is an old idea that objects have life of their own, to treat things and places with special, perhaps obsessive care, is more sensible if it is seen to have a life of its own. If an axe was involved in a murder, it was sensible to destroy the axe.

Two. How about simple Jungian Archetypes we see in all sci-fi and fantasy.

The Orphan Hero: Kvothe, Luke Skywalker, Harry Potter, Frodo.

The Wise Old Man: Elodin, Obiwan, Dumbledore, Gandalph.

The Eternal Child: Auri, R2D2/C3PO (play the fools at times), Hagrid, The Hobbits, or like River from Firefly. Innocent yet make powerful choices.


Kerry Fohgetdatshit wrote: "@Kerry

Nice......I'm not sure what your point is, but I like that you have some BG in storytelling psychology.

Much of the reason you see lots of Jungian archetypes in Sci Fi and fantasy is bec..."


The Slow Regard does suggest her back story is a journey. I think Campbell called it "Ashes," living in the basement, sleeping by the hearth, tending the flame that warms the master's home, literally. She mends the Works. This is her current situation after having been abandoned, or becoming withdrawn. She speaks to objects. (Alone. Reminds of the Tom Hanks character talking to the soccer ball Wilson.)

There is some suggestion that Auri (not her original name)had received formal instruction, and having gained a skill (making soap a simple creation just one example), she ponders that she has surpassed all expectation with that skill. Her new name, Auri, she accepts that new name from Kvothe and begins to transform.


message 38: by Kerry (last edited Dec 07, 2014 04:45PM) (new) - rated it 3 stars

Kerry This work is a published tale about one character. Tolkien crafted many fragments of story to help him conceptualize his mythology. Edited by his son after his father died. I agree, it is not a stand alone story, it is closer to poetry than a novella or short story in that respect. The journey is incomplete.

Where I was confused by the discussion was the talk about mental illness. We are not trying to figure out if Auri mistook Kvothe for a hat.

This is high fantasy after all. A world of magical creatures that is subject to its own laws and physics. Unless Kvothe wakes up in New York City, the habits and vices of his fantasy characters has no purpose but to serve the story. Auri can be a ghost(like Nearly Headless Nick), a fairy (like Tinkerbell), a princess in heart (Cinderella, also of the ashes by the name cinder,) or a God (George Burns)but her behavior is form over substance until we get the larger story and the rules that apply to Auri's fantasy world. Even then...

Science Fiction always puts the story first and skips the science, and the headache, of determining if it could actually work.

Auri only needs to be there when Kvothe needs her, and we only need to understand what motivated Auri to be in the right spot at the right time to the extent she would not appear deus ex machina. Though in Kvothe's world that may be where the larger story leads.

Bruce Lee- "like a finger pointing away to the moon, dont concentrate on the finger or you'll miss all the heavenly glory"


Mike Kerry wrote: "This work is a published tale about one character. Tolkien crafted many fragments of story to help him conceptualize his mythology. Edited by his son after his father died. I agree, it is not a ..."

+1. Very well stated! Kudos.


Twerking To Beethoven I just wanted to point out that, as of today, December 9th 2014, TSROST has sinked to a rating of 3.99.

At the of the day, you can't bullpoo customers.


Mike Idcboobs wrote: "Mike wrote: "I would say that Auri doesn't suffer from any illness. If anything she sees things more clearly than any other and as such acts appropriately. As if a certain portion of her mind has b..."

Except this isn't the real world we're discussing...it's fantasy. At least that's what I was referring to. My comment was not meant to have a real world connotation.


Kaitlyn Mental illness is not beautiful. And it does not help to present debilitating, dangerous mental illness as beautiful, twee, quirky, or like a special snowflake.


idcboobs Mike wrote: "Idcboobs wrote: "Mike wrote: "I would say that Auri doesn't suffer from any illness. If anything she sees things more clearly than any other and as such acts appropriately. As if a certain portion ..."

except there are the exact same mental illness's in the real world. The mental illness Auri experiences isn't a fiction brain tumour, it's something real people have to deal with every day.


When something has serious context within the real world, it is not okay to make that serious context out to be something romantic within a fantasy novel with the excuse that it's fake.

Imagine you had depression and you read a book about a 14 year old girl with depression and everything is like a poem to her. It's okay though because according to you it's not real.


message 44: by Mike (last edited Jan 06, 2015 03:37PM) (new) - rated it 3 stars

Mike Idcboobs wrote: "Mike wrote: "Idcboobs wrote: "Mike wrote: "I would say that Auri doesn't suffer from any illness. If anything she sees things more clearly than any other and as such acts appropriately. As if a cer..."

Wow, I see that you are possibly dealing with some things and I am not here to go back and forth. As such, In an effort to make my point a little more clear, this will be my final comment on the subject.

My comment was related to my interpretation of what was happening in the book and had no real world connotation to it whatsoever. However, I assume the personal experiences of your life lead you to take something personal and entirely different from the book.

It would be naive of me to say that mental illness doesn't exist and let me help you to understand that I never made any such statement.

I said it's a fantasy novel. A book that deals with abstract and fantastical concepts. Characters are created by authors who have a certain mental picture and understanding of them. Ultimately, often times that character is something entirely different to many of the readers. However, I do not believe that PR wrote the character with the intent of conveying she was mentally ill. I believe the character has grown from her first inception and that even PR possibly doesn't know where she'll end up or what exactly her origins are. That's just me though, I could be entirely wrong, but that's what I'VE taken away from his works which have included her. My original content was me saying that I believe she was not ill, rather... (Find it and read it again if you wish). However, maybe in the end it's revealed she does battle some disorder. Who knows? Not you, not me, and I bet not even PR at this stage. Though he likely has an idea.

Everyone is different. Don't project your thoughts and feelings on to others and feel as though everyone should have the same or similar thought processes as you. It's a disservice to yourself and those who might wish to have a thoughtful discussion with you.

Auri is a fictional character. What ever similar parallels she may have to others in the real world, is not necessarily the way the author intended for the character to be received. But that is how you may have received her.

Lastly, do not be so presumptuous as to lecture me on mental illness as though I know nothing of the battle people with such hardships face. You know nothing of me or of my life personally. Since I was a young boy I have been around mental disorders and such hardships, intimately, and every single day of my life since.

Everyone is unique. You jump to criticize the author and others based off of your interpretation of his works, but are totally oblivious to the point that you're closed minded to the fact that others have interpreted it differently. And no matter how outlandish their interpretation may seem to you, maybe it's pretty close to what the author intended in his work. Then again maybe not.


idcboobs Mike wrote: "Idcboobs wrote: "Mike wrote: "Idcboobs wrote: "Mike wrote: "I would say that Auri doesn't suffer from any illness. If anything she sees things more clearly than any other and as such acts appropria..."

I'm sorry if you thought i was attacking you but that same presumption that you feel i made of you is the same presumption i get from the novel.

I'll skip a bunch of what you're saying and get straight to the point. All of us have noticed the same theme within the novel; Auri portrayed as a mentally ill teenager, i personally feel this point is not up for debate, it's hardly subtle either. If anything it was intentional for Auri to be seen this way, which is exactly why it shouldn't be allowed. Authors intentionally romanticizing mental illness's like this is becoming a common theme to attract teenagers to an author's work.

I perceived your previous comment to point out that fiction is not seen in the real world, that's all. What i was attempting to convey through my comment was that issues that have context within the real world are not different issues within a fantasy world. The author is dealing with a serious issue and it should not be shoved aside by the readers because it's romantic or whatever, it should be pointed out because although this is fiction, it is not a fictional illness.

Again i was not attacking you in any way, i was attacking my interpretation of what i assumed you were saying.


Kerry Two excerpts about Auri from Name of the Wind.


Auri relaxed a bit and came a few steps closer to me. "I brought you a feather with the spring wind in it, but since you were late..." she looked at me gravely, "you get a coin instead." She held it out at arm's length, pinched between her thumb and forefinger. "It will keep you safe at night. As much as anything can, that is." It was shaped like an Aturan penance piece, but it gleamed silver in the moonlight. I'd never seen a coin like it.
''''
She smiled and thrust her hand forward. Something gleamed in the moonlight. "A key," she said proudly, pressing it on me.
I took it. It had a pleasing weight in my hand. "It's very nice," I said. "What does it unlock?"
"The moon," she said, her expression grave.

''''

Is she mentally ill or dotty? does she speak metaphorically? is she in love and is winning his attention? is she a powerful (namer/shaper) and is speaking something close to truth, is she fai and they are always an alternately playful/angry bunch?

Don't know ... the author has not decided yet and written it down ... clearly committed to it.

Some guess she is Princess Ariel. Some guess her power to shape and change things is awesome, so her Regard for Silent Things is also great lest she rend rather than repair the world around her.

A teen maybe... to an extreme degree, as a metaphorical coming of age, accepting your power and letting go of childish things.

PTSD, a war survivor. Time will tell.

One poet described his writings as no longer belonging to him once published. They are released into the world and take a life of their own, assume new meanings, interpretations change with the times, the reader is who makes them meaningful.


idcboobs Kerry wrote: "Two excerpts about Auri from Name of the Wind.


Auri relaxed a bit and came a few steps closer to me. "I brought you a feather with the spring wind in it, but since you were late..." she looked at..."


that's nice and all but really this is all hypothetical. What we do know is written in the novels and until we get the third novel in 2030 we won't understand who Auri is.

Until then what we do know is that she's basically a mentally ill teenager starring in her very own 150 page $10 novella. She's basically rich.


message 48: by Kerry (last edited Jan 05, 2015 05:57PM) (new) - rated it 3 stars

Kerry Idcboobs wrote: "... she's basically a mentally ill teenager starring in her very own 150 page $10 novella. She's basically rich. "

Speaking of rich and forever novels. George R R Martin came out and said some fan discussions have guessed the ending of his GOT series by identifying clues. But he's decided he won't change ending since they are a distinct minority.


idcboobs Kerry wrote: "Idcboobs wrote: "... she's basically a mentally ill teenager starring in her very own 150 page $10 novella. She's basically rich. "

Speaking of rich and forever novels. George R R Martin came out..."



Heard about that, to be fair there are a lot of theories out there about his series and i've read through my fair share.

We still won't know how his books end for another 40 or so years by my guess so the theories are a good read. It's a shame they all won't make the cut since a good dozen of them were incredibly detailed on the "asoiaf" backstory guesses


Mike Idcboobs wrote: "Mike wrote: "Idcboobs wrote: "Mike wrote: "Idcboobs wrote: "Mike wrote: "I would say that Auri doesn't suffer from any illness. If anything she sees things more clearly than any other and as such a..."

Sorry. I was having a long day. It's hard to ascertain tone and such with electronic communications. Totally understand and appreciate your input.


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