Superheroes and Comic Book Club discussion

Graphic Novels and Comics in the Classroom: Essays on the Educational Power of Sequential Art
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Comics in the Classroom

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Althea J. | 10 comments I just read this great non-fiction collection of essays, Graphic Novels and Comics in the Classroom: Essays on the Educational Power of Sequential Art and found it really inspiring. So I wanted to share it with you all. It may be of particular interest to teachers or anyone who's interested in innovation in education.

If you're interested, here's my review
Just a taste... "This book demonstrates the crazy diverse possibilities of the comics medium and includes such a range of educational contexts in which the medium can be applied."

Out of curiousity, are there any teachers in this group who have used graphic novels or comics in their classrooms?


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Jim (jkmfilms) | 787 comments Mod
That sounds like such a fascinating book! It would be a great read for when we do a non-fiction book for this club. I'm going to have to get it regardless if we read it hear or not...


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Madison (jewelsavestheday) | 13 comments I am 100% in support of using graphic novels in class. I teach ESL at a university. Every semester, we have to pick two books that our students must read outside of class (that we then talk about in class). I always try to choose graphic novels for my lowest-level English class, when that option arises (not often, sadly). They read a graphic version of King Arthur, which was fairly successful. It's hard to find books where the English is not too difficult, though.


Althea J. | 10 comments Jim: I hope you enjoy it! Lately I've been wanting to explore GNs that take the comics medium to interesting places. This book definitely takes really fresh approaches on how GNs can be read with a more critical/deeper eye, or used to enhance the learning experience, or used to expose oneself to diverse cultures or perspectives.

I also got some great ideas of GNs to check out. I'm excited to apply my new understanding and try out some of the approaches demonstrated in the various essays of this book.

For example, there's a whole essay in Graphic Novels and Comics in the Classroom: Essays on the Educational Power of Sequential Art that uses the GN The Waste Land by Martin Rowan as a jumping off point to delve into the concepts of modernism and modernist literature. I can't wait to read it for myself and look at it from that perspective.

Graphic Novels and Comics in the Classroom: Essays on the Educational Power of Sequential Art would be a great book for sparking discussion! I look forward to seeing what everyone else thinks :)


Althea J. | 10 comments Madison wrote: "It's hard to find books where the English is not too difficult, though."

That's an interesting dilemma - needing simplistic language but wanting the story to be of interest for adults.

I don't know if this will be helpful but I heard about a line of graphic novels called Classical Comics where they do classic books in GN form, but they offer 3 different versions, each geared for a different level of reader. I heard about it thru this review of their Macbeth title, which explains it much better than I just did:

MACBETH: Original Text
This volume takes every scene, every word of Shakespeare’s classic play and adapts it into a comic. It is the full, unabridged play with original language intact.

MACBETH: Plain Text
The Plain Text volume uses the same art as the Original Text volume. The entire play is reproduced; however, the language is translated into Plain English,

MACBETH: Quick Text
The third adaptation also uses the same art as the first two. The story is still the same; however, this volume takes the Plain Text language and culls all words that are unnecessary to the essence of the story. What is left is an easy-to-read translation for struggling readers.

And they have a bunch of different titles. I haven't read any so I can't speak to the quality but the concept is interesting.


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CoolNameGuy (sycomantis91) | 4 comments I know in an episode of Comic Book Men, a surgeon was selling some stuff to help fund his idea for comic strips related to different procedures. I love these ideas


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Christian Green | 16 comments Graphic novels in the classroom are a great idea. Especially if you are creative and put together a comprehensive lesson on how to relate superheroes to the real world. There is a high school teacher in Boston that purchased my superhero novel and is currently doing an entire unit on it. I think more and more writers of the genre are focusing on making these stories more relatable to real life.


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