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Previous Quarterly Films > Quarterly Movie Nov '14 - Jan '15: Breakfast on Pluto

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message 1: by Emma (new)

Emma Flanagan (emma89) This is the discussion thread for our November 2014 to January 2015 quarterly movie, Breakfast on Pluto


message 2: by Emma (new)

Emma Flanagan (emma89) This should make for some interesting discussions. It's slightly harder hitting than our last two selections.


message 3: by Sara (new)

Sara | 2357 comments Mod
I noticed this hadn't been getting any discussion. I just finished watching it today. I have to say I was impressed with how sensitive the portrayal of a transgender woman character was. I have a number of trans friends and help run a small LGBT conference so I'm aware of just how much insensitive stereotyped schlock is out there. There's a few small issues, but overall it was very well down. I also thought the film did a great job of integrating the IRA plot line, as well as disability and race issues. It was also nice to see for a change a film with a flawed and human Irish priest who was still a good guy. Finally, I loved the campy style. The chirping subtitled birds was a nice touch.


message 4: by Emma (new)

Emma Flanagan (emma89) I think with all that's been going on its just slipped people's minds. I've seen it before but keep meaning to have a re-watch but then I get sidetracked.

I agree about the IRA stuff. It's also a good portrayal of what it could be like to be Irish in London during the troubles. I've heard stories off those there at the time of random arrests and having your car stripped and searched for being in the wrong place at the wrong time.


message 5: by Sara (new)

Sara | 2357 comments Mod
I've put the book, Breakfast on Pluto, on hold at the library. I'm interested in seeing how it compares to the movie. It was short listed for the Booker Prize as was The Butcher Boy.


message 6: by Emma (new)

Emma Flanagan (emma89) I've never read Breakfast on Pluto. I did The Butchers Boy in college and hated it. The story though is quite different to Breakfast on Pluto.


message 7: by Barbara (new)

Barbara (bdegar) | 4626 comments Sara wrote: "I noticed this hadn't been getting any discussion. I just finished watching it today. I have to say I was impressed with how sensitive the portrayal of a transgender woman character was. I have a n..."

I haven't watched this film again but I have seen it at least 3 times. I used it in a class and was amazed at how many positive descriptors my students came up with for Kitten. It is a complex story and I think viewing the film more than once is a good idea. It is amazing how many themes there are in the film, and the idea of setting the story during the Troubles is genius. In the early 80's Ireland was a very unfriendly place for GLBT people. I once ran into a friend at Logan airport in Boston who was seeing off Irish friends. One of women had too much luggage and I took one of her bags for her - something it would be almost impossible to do now. In thanks, they let me stay with them in Dublin. It was a house full of lesbians and the I noted that in the US, straight and gay women rarely mixed. They told me in Ireland of the time, anyone who was open minded about sex and sexuality tended to be friendly because the society was so closed on those topics. A friend who was on sabbatical met me in Dublin and one of the women drove us to Donegal and we stayed in her cottage for a few days. We then went hired a car and carried on.


message 8: by Emma (new)

Emma Flanagan (emma89) @Barbara Unfriendly would be putting it mildly. It was still illegal. Thankfully we've moved on though their still places, like the small rural village Kitty is from, which can be pretty conservative. It's not unheard of for people to be out in Dublin, but not be when they go home down the country. Their parents or siblings might know, but you wouldn't tell granny.


message 9: by Barbara (new)

Barbara (bdegar) | 4626 comments Emma wrote: "@Barbara Unfriendly would be putting it mildly. It was still illegal. Thankfully we've moved on though their still places, like the small rural village Kitty is from, which can be pretty conservati..."

I'd say this is also true in the US. Nell McCafferty didn't want to write her autobiography while her mother was still living but she did and that was just in the past 10 years. Her mother was all right with her sexual orientation in the end.


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