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Does dystopian fiction affect young readers? - SURVEY

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message 1: by Eleanor (last edited Nov 16, 2014 01:05AM) (new) - added it

Eleanor Katherine I'm doing an EPQ (Extended Project Qualification) at school at the moment, entitled "How has the dystopian genre influenced the political or ethical views of young people in modern society?", and it would really help me out if people could just really quickly fill out a quick survey for me - it's only 9 questions, none of which require too much thought! Here's the link - https://www.surveymonkey.com/s/LV8R3LW

Thank you!

UPDATE: the survey is now closed - I've received 200 replies so thank you to everyone who participated!


John Could you clarify your request? You ask for "young people in modern society", does young mean young now? Does modern society mean this century?

I was young once. I read "Brave New World" when I was @ fourteen. My attention was just beginning to move from small town boyish interests to the wider world. As I look back over the decades, I can confidently say that it had a major impact on my political and ethical views.

Your survey's age question tops out at "26+". That would cover me but I don't want to mess your results up with my extended perspective.


message 3: by Eleanor (new) - added it

Eleanor Katherine John wrote: "Could you clarify your request? You ask for "young people in modern society", does young mean young now? Does modern society mean this century?

I was young once. I read "Brave New World" when I ..."


I'm mainly concentrating on those who are 'young' now, and modern society meaning the last couple of decades - particularly since the turn of the century. However, any input from those who are older is also helpful to my research as a way to see if dystopian fiction becoming more popular in the last twenty years has had more of an impact than existing dystopian fiction did before.


message 4: by KT (last edited Nov 06, 2014 06:49AM) (new) - rated it 3 stars

KT I filled out your survey. Hope it's not too late.

This year I read 1984, Brave New World, and A Clockwork Orange all in two months. Having read those books relatively close together, I went into a sort of compare/contrast mode. It was really interesting to see what they all had to say and how well they said it. It was interesting how Clockwork was actually a darker brand of literature than I was used to, but I felt that it was a very effective social commentary. It made the question of the rights of society versus the rights of the individual really tough for me to grapple with, which I thought was amazing.


Allan From my reading perspective of some 60 years now, I would guess that dystopian fiction is probably more mainstream than in my youth. It's harder for governments to cover up misdeeds what with social media and internet access available for many. Modern dystopian fiction acts as a counter to government and corporate malfeasance.


Jaksen I took your survey even though I'm 'older.' I've been reading books like this for many, many years and remain pretty much the happy-go-lucky person I've always been. So even though I read many dystopian-type novels throughout the years - I don't think it's done much to alter my thinking. (I used to call them 'end of the world' novels before the word dystopian became so mainstream.) :D


message 7: by Eleanor (new) - added it

Eleanor Katherine Thank you! :)


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