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Rubicon: The Last Years of the Roman Republic
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ROMAN EMPIRE -THE HISTORY... > 6. RUBICON ~ October 27th - November 2nd ~ Six - A Banquet of Carrion (150 - 178) ~ No Spoilers

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message 1: by Vicki, Assisting Moderator - Ancient Roman History (new) - rated it 3 stars

Vicki Cline | 3822 comments Mod
This week's reading assignment is:


Week 6 - October 27th - November 2nd -> Chapter Six - A Banquet of Carrion (150 - 178)


We will open up a thread for each week's reading. Please make sure to post in the particular thread dedicated to those specific chapters and page numbers to avoid spoilers. We will also open up supplemental threads as we did for other spotlighted books.

We look forward to your participation. Amazon, Barnes and Noble, Borders and other noted on line booksellers do have copies of the book and shipment can be expedited. The book can also be obtained easily at your local library, or on your Kindle.

There is no rush and we are thrilled to have you join us. It is never too late to get started and/or to post.

Vicki Cline will be moderating this discussion.

Welcome,

Vicki and Bryan

TO ALWAYS SEE ALL WEEKS' THREADS, SELECT VIEW ALL

Rubicon The Last Years of the Roman Republic by Tom Holland by Tom Holland Tom Holland

REMEMBER NO SPOILERS ON THE WEEKLY NON SPOILER THREADS - ON EACH WEEKLY NON SPOILER THREAD - WE ONLY DISCUSS THE PAGES ASSIGNED OR THE PAGES WHICH WERE COVERED IN PREVIOUS WEEKS. IF YOU GO AHEAD OR WANT TO ENGAGE IN MORE EXPANSIVE DISCUSSION - POST THOSE COMMENTS IN ONE OF THE SPOILER THREADS. THESE CHAPTERS HAVE A LOT OF INFORMATION SO WHEN IN DOUBT CHECK WITH THE CHAPTER OVERVIEW AND SUMMARY TO RECALL WHETHER YOUR COMMENTS ARE ASSIGNMENT SPECIFIC. EXAMPLES OF SPOILER THREADS ARE THE GLOSSARY, THE BIBLIOGRAPHY, THE INTRODUCTION AND THE BOOK AS A WHOLE THREADS.

Notes:


It is always a tremendous help when you quote specifically from the book itself and reference the chapter and page numbers when responding. The text itself helps folks know what you are referencing and makes things clear.

Citations:

If an author or book is mentioned other than the book and author being discussed, citations must be included according to our guidelines. Also, when citing other sources, please provide credit where credit is due and/or the link. There is no need to re-cite the author and the book we are discussing however.

Here is the link to the thread titled Mechanics of the Board which will help you with the citations and how to do them.
http://www.goodreads.com/topic/show/2...

Table of Contents and Syllabus

Glossary
Remember there is a glossary thread where ancillary information is placed by the moderator. This is also a thread where additional information can be placed by the group members regarding the subject matter being discussed.

Bibliography

Book as a Whole and Final Thoughts - SPOILER THREAD


message 2: by Vicki, Assisting Moderator - Ancient Roman History (new) - rated it 3 stars

Vicki Cline | 3822 comments Mod
Chapter Overview and Summaries


6. A Banquet of Carrion


Sulla had only temporarily stopped Mithridates, not finished him off. Mithridates even tried to ally with the Marians in Spain. The Senate realized something had to be done and sent Lucius Lucullus, one of the haughtiest of the optimates. Even though Lucullus’ army was much smaller than Mithridates’, he was able, over the course of two years, to wear down the king’s army and finally to take over the whole of the kingdom of Pontus. However, Mithridates himself escaped to Armenia and its king Tigranes. Lucullus forged on to Tigranocertes, Tigranes’ capital, farther from Rome than any general had ever been before, and vanquished it. It looked as though Lucullus had achieved total victory, but his troops were weary of being at war for so long, and were stirred up to mutiny by Lucullus’ own brother-in-law, Publius Clodius Pulcher. While Lucullus’ legions refused to march, Mithridates retook Pontus.

Meanwhile, Rome was being harassed by pirates, who would kidnap people for ransom (including a young Julius Caesar) and capture ships with goods bound for Rome. The pirates were even so bold as to sail into Ostia, Rome’s main seaport, and burn a war fleet. Rome was very short of grain and was desperate. Even though the Senate was loath to give a lot of power to one man, it finally awarded Pompey the Great proconsular power over the whole Mediterranean (Mare Nostrum, “our sea”), including 50 miles inland. Pompey must have been a marvelous organizer, since he finished the job of clearing away the pirates in just three months. Next, the Senate sent Pompey to take over from Lucullus, who was sent home in disgrace. Pompey had no trouble fixing things in Asia, organizing the several provinces and client kingdoms there.


message 3: by Vicki, Assisting Moderator - Ancient Roman History (new) - rated it 3 stars

Vicki Cline | 3822 comments Mod
I was a little surprised at how much detail Holland went into regarding Lucullus' battles against Mithridates and Tigranes. I've always admired Lucullus because of his attempts to deal fairly with the Greek and Asian cities, earning him the hatred of the publicani. I guess it was his bad luck to marry the infamous Clodia, thus acquiring her equally infamous brother Clodius as an in-law.

Its interesting that Plutarch included Lucullus in his Lives: The Noble Grecians and Romans, along with more pivotal characters like Marius, Sulla, Pompey and Caesar.

Lives of the Noble Grecians and Romans by Plutarch by Plutarch Plutarch


Bryan Craig It was good to read about Lucullus; I didn't know much about him. It was interesting that he understood that you should not smash Greek culture, but give it "space," at least some autonomy.

I also appreciated the fact Lucullus let the defeated population Tigranocerta be free to become separatists.


Katy (kathy_h) Wow, we certainly are marching through Roman history quickly. I am impressed at how much Holland can squeeze into each chapter and still pull it all together.

Love the title of this chapter. Roman quest for power is leaving "carrion" in its wake, both abroad and at home.


Bryan Craig I never knew how much the slave trade was so widespread. Slaves were supplied by pirates, then they start taking Romans. I see piracy is as old as humankind.


message 7: by Vicki, Assisting Moderator - Ancient Roman History (new) - rated it 3 stars

Vicki Cline | 3822 comments Mod
It's really amazing how fast Pompey cleared the Mediterranean of pirates. I especially like that he didn't just kill all of them, but settled some on farmlands.

"Pompey spared numerous Cilician pirates who had been taken prisoner, realizing that many had been driven to such recourse by desperation. Those who surrendered were settled in various parts of the southern coast of Asia Minor, where the population was sparse. Settlements were created at Mallus, Adana, and Epiphaneia in Cilicia. Many were settled at Soli, which was thereafter called Pompeiopolis."

Source: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Cilician...

Note that this is quite different from the practice of giving retired soldiers land in Italy, starting with Marius. Both types of settlements were controversial.


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