Friends of Chômu Press discussion

21 views

Comments Showing 1-21 of 21 (21 new)    post a comment »
dateDown arrow    newest »

message 1: by Axolotl (new)

Axolotl | 176 comments Mod
Remember when I Wonder What Human Flesh Tastes Likedropped?
I do.

Mostly because it was the beginning of a snowy blowy winter in that quiet time at the beginning of a new year. I was in self-imposed (and very necessary) hibernation due to a crisis in my personal life; holed-up inside while blizzards raged in the downtown streets and more than a little frightened about my future prospects on this ball of dirt--but I digress...

When Justin's collection came out, Chômu Press called for readers to interpret its cover, to decipher its meaning; if you wrote a short piece which the editors believed fit the artwork, you would win a copy of the book.
This was a very ambitious and faithful move by Chomu Press and I believe that they only subsequently attempted something similar on one other occasion: with Mark Samuels' The Man Who Collected Machen and Other Weird Tales, where those who purchased the book could attempt to decipher the alien language on the pages issuing forth from the typewriter on its cover.
I think most would agree that Chômu Press books have compelling cover design and feature stunningly vivid and interesting art. I think most members will also be quick to agree that this does not simply mean "excellent for POD books" but even by the standard of books designed by major publishers, whom they quite frankly make mincemeat of design-wise (and other-wise).

Now in this discussion forum I would like to know which covers are your favorites--I know D.F. Lewis was thrilled by Heather Horsley's cover designed for his book Nemonymous Night.

But not only which are your favorites...we want to know, for example:

If you submitted an essay or piece deconstructing the meaning of Justin's goldbricking Gyaru looking so, unaccountably, lonely there on the bed.

Who are the old man and little boy in Stella Connell Levy's photo on the cover of Connell's The Galaxy Club?

Does Chris Conn Askew's cover for All God's Angels, Beware! manage to reference every story in that collection in one way or another?

Which cover has no words on it at all and why not?

Which artists (living or dead) do you think would be a good fit for Chômu's style?


message 2: by Karl (last edited Oct 29, 2014 06:00PM) (new)

Karl | 32 comments Australian Tim Patch is an artist who uses his pecker to paint.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=hWZpQ...

Vinicius Quesada is a talented street artist from Brazil who likes to add a shock value to his artwork. His series entitled, Blood Piss Blues, were created using exactly what it says – blood and urine. The Brazilian street artist makes incredibly detailed psychedelic art of violent geishas, smoking monkeys and other apocalyptic images.

http://sobadsogood.com/2013/01/22/vin...


message 3: by Karl (new)

Karl | 32 comments American artist Kira Ayn Varszegi uses her 38DD breasts as brushes, to create original paintings.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=W7NO7...


message 4: by Axolotl (last edited Oct 29, 2014 06:36PM) (new)

Axolotl | 176 comments Mod
Tim Patch's art is pretty *yawn*. I suppose that even though the pictures themselves are boring, he somehow manages to make everyone look a little demonic, it forces me to wonder if, like Ice-T, Patch has an "evil dick"? I suppose if the subject arouses interest in him, he's able to do a better job.

I really like Quesada's art, I'd like to add that he seems pretty well-adjusted in conversation.

Nice post.


message 5: by Axolotl (new)

Axolotl | 176 comments Mod
Karl, what is it about using parts of the body as artistic implements brings to mind Chomu Press for you?


message 6: by Karl (new)

Karl | 32 comments Axolotl wrote: "Karl, what is it about using parts of the body as artistic implements brings to mind Chomu Press for you?"

These are artists that push the boundaries of art yet still have creativity and allure with their images. It's not that important about using a body part per-se , as much as unique and extraordinary imagery accomplishments created. I think the unconventional approach to art adds an enhancement to out of the ordinary literature. I could have included the guy who makes art with dead ants 200,000 per painting/creation. Why not go beyond the conventional along with the narrative.


message 7: by Karl (new)

Karl | 32 comments Axolotl wrote: "Karl, what is it about using parts of the body as artistic implements brings to mind Chomu Press for you?"

Body parts (also known as appendages) also include hands. Many artists use their hands to create, why limit and contain oneself when so many other appendages are available. This is a rather conservative view of creativity. These same appendages are also sometimes used to write books. How many authors type or write with their penis or breasts ? Someone should take a survey. It may be eye opening or perhaps astounding.


message 8: by Axolotl (new)

Axolotl | 176 comments Mod
I agree with you but (in most cases) I'd prefer not know how something was made and simply appreciate it. After all, I believe I'd like Henry James no better or worse if I knew he dipped his pecker rather than quill in ink, I just wouldn't much care.

Use what you like to make art. As long as it is good.


message 9: by Randolph (new)

Randolph (us227381) I once used me bum to write a Dear John letter to a girlfriend I wanted to toss off. Is that Art?


message 10: by Karl (new)

Karl | 32 comments Randolph wrote: "I once used me bum to write a Dear John letter to a girlfriend I wanted to toss off. Is that Art?"

Did the bum feel well used, and was he admired by his pear group later? Did you save a copy of the letter for verification / valuation purposes ? Did the girlfriend become a stalker afterwords?


message 11: by Axolotl (last edited Nov 08, 2014 11:17PM) (new)

Axolotl | 176 comments Mod
All good questions, Karl. Randolph?

It's interesting that, although there has been little activity in this group--you two decided to comment on just this evening when I was planning to comment on the cover of John Elliott's Human Pages.

Description
I'll first describe this cover. It is predominantly black but has 3 other colours: black, white, gray, and orange. The picture with occupies the majority of the center is a silhouette of a non-realistic human head in profile. This silhouette's most unrealistic features are its triangular pointy nose, lack of brow and nape of neck. Within the silhouette are a non-realistic city-scape with many steeples, gables and domes. All of them are done with geometric shapes, most of which are symmetrical.

Interpretation
The pairing of grey (in different shadings) with the vibrant orange is particularly striking and suggestive of danger.
The buildings within the silhouette serve to, possibly, represent the opportunities afforded a human utilizing the services of the Chance Company, in that they could live both their fantasy (what is in their head can come out) and in the sense that, theoretically they could occupy any one of the dwellings shown. The cover also works in a suggestive way, in that parts of the buildings (windows and roofs, for example) can also work as body parts superimposed upon the face in profile. Two examples are windows and roofs as eyes and the windows as teeth near the jaw of the profile. These details on the side of a face in profile are also suggestive of Egyptian hieroglyphic depictions of humans.

Note
Interestingly--I'm not sure if this was intentional--the cover works as a sort of "magic eye" picture and if you hold the cover against your nose and cross your eyes, different images and faces can be seen when you slowly move the cover away.


message 12: by Quentin (new)

Quentin Crisp | 27 comments Chômu Press designer Bigeyebrow has been keeping a Tumblr account of the kind of artists we'd like to work with, here:

http://chomulikes.tumblr.com/

Hope it's of interest.


message 13: by Randolph (new)

Randolph (us227381) Quentin wrote: "Chômu Press designer Bigeyebrow has been keeping a Tumblr account of the kind of artists we'd like to work with, here:

http://chomulikes.tumblr.com/

Hope it's of interest."


Most interesting.


message 14: by Karl (new)

Karl | 32 comments Quentin wrote: "Chômu Press designer Bigeyebrow has been keeping a Tumblr account of the kind of artists we'd like to work with, here:

http://chomulikes.tumblr.com/

Hope it's of interest."


I admire the use of color, and some of the art appears to be three dimensional, nice stuff.


message 15: by Quentin (new)

Quentin Crisp | 27 comments It's not inconceivable that some of these artists will actually feature on the covers of future releases. For some reason, on my computer, I can only get one screen of the images, but there should be more than that, as this has been accumulating for a while.


message 16: by Axolotl (new)

Axolotl | 176 comments Mod
I should have said this before now in response to Quentin's post but...I certainly hope some of this art is used, as most of it is very striking. Thanks for sharing it Quentin.

Google image search "Charlie Immer", an artist I stumbled upon a while ago. Some of his (or her) work is quite good.


message 17: by Justin (new)

Justin Isis (justinisis) | 16 comments Axolotl wrote: "Karl, what is it about using parts of the body as artistic implements brings to mind Chomu Press for you?"

These are artists that push the boundaries of art yet still have creativity and allure with their images.


Just caught this now. This is on the right track Chomu is not about writing in the sense of an abstract program or commercial craft. It is more like an overall art movement or lifestyle. At the moment I am spending as much time on visual art and hip-hop as I am on writing...and activities of my occult/magickal group here which include strong performance and ritual elements. Writing involves all aspects of the human body especially the digestive and reproductive systems. Upcoming books including the Mark Samuels tribute anthology "Marked to Die" will include alternate hand-lettered versions. Eating, dancing, sex and other movements are all continuous with writing and forming language

Rokudenashiko 3D art print vagina:

http://6d745.com/gallery/

http://www.theguardian.com/world/2015...


message 18: by Randolph (new)

Randolph (us227381) Only the Japanese could turn the vagina into a cartoon character you could put on a t-shirt and not get arrested for wearing.


message 19: by Axolotl (new)

Axolotl | 176 comments Mod
Justin wrote: "Axolotl wrote: "Karl, what is it about using parts of the body as artistic implements brings to mind Chomu Press for you?"

These are artists that push the boundaries of art yet still have creativi..."


Justin, just to help me understand: when you say "Chomu" here, do you mean the publisher itself, or the individual writers?
What you are saying is, if I understand it: a writer might write a "Chomu book", but not embody the "Chomu lifestyle" wholesale.


message 20: by Justin (new)

Justin Isis (justinisis) | 16 comments Not everyone will be on board with it but there is definitely a mindset behind it...The press is about that mindset which didn't exist before it came together. A lot of presses/publishers/magazines are about repeating genres/ideas or reifying the past, Chomu is about making something that doesn't exist...


message 21: by Randolph (new)

Randolph (us227381) Justin wrote: "Not everyone will be on board with it but there is definitely a mindset behind it...The press is about that mindset which didn't exist before it came together. A lot of presses/publishers/magazines..."

Fab!


back to top