2014-2015 Renovaré Christian Book Club discussion

The Way of a Pilgrim and the Pilgrim Continues His Way
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Week 1, The Way of a Pilgrim

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message 1: by Joan (new)

Joan | 14 comments Mod
The Way of a Pilgrim led by Gary Moon starts October 27, 2014


message 2: by Brenda (new)

Brenda Quinn | 106 comments Mod
If you are a Renovare Book Club Member, please see the "Experience Guide" by Gary Moon at the Members page of the Renovare website. Click on The Way of the Pilgrim in the upper left corner of this page. We will be using The Way of a Pilgrim as devotional reading and we suggest reading maybe 5-10 pages per day. Through podcasts in upcoming weeks we'll hear from two Orthodox priests in answer to questions on the Jesus Prayer, the origin of this book, Hesychasm, salvation, and more. Bring your thoughts and questions here to Goodreads and we can consider together.

You can still join the Renovare Book Club if you have not done so. Go to www.renovare.org. You can also obtain this book from Renovare.

I'm looking forward to the way the book will help us to " an active experience of prayer, and an ever-deepening awareness of Christ and his here and now kingdom" (Gary Moon in the Introductory Essay). A blessed Monday and week of reading to all!


message 3: by Daniel (new)

Daniel | 7 comments I ordered this book on Kindle, so I'm unsure if the translation I am using is the same, but I am THOROUGHLY engrossed in this book! I am looking forward to this journey.


Bill from Florida | 50 comments Today, while walking, I tried to focus on the prayer for 5 minutes. Wow, I have a long way to go to be able to concentrate for even that short a time.


message 5: by Kyle (new)

Kyle Norman | 16 comments I was looking forward to the start of this book, and I have to say, one chapter in and I haven't been disappointed - actually simply reading the 2003 Preface made me not disappointed!

It was both exhilarating and comforting to hear the Pilgrim talk about not being 'Taught' how to pray. This echoes a recent realization that I had, about being told the 'forms' but never lead into the heart of prayer. Although the notion of repeating a phrase even 3000 times seems daunting, I very much look forward to walking with the Pilgrim over the next few weeks.


message 6: by Cath (new)

Cath Swanson | 10 comments where do we download the podcasts please?


message 7: by Debbie (new)

Debbie | 2 comments I have been really encouraged and challenged by the preface and start of ch 1. I found my self awake in the middle of the night (I'm a mom of a teen who is walking a hard road), I used the Jesus prayer to settle my heart and fall back to sleep. I'm really looking forward to challenging myself to 'experiencing/practicing prayer' and not just reading about it.


Karen | 2 comments I have begun to read the Way of the Pilgrim and really enjoy it and have begun a practice of prayer using the Jesus Prayer for the past two mornings and last night very late. The distractions in my mind are very challenging but I keep trying to gently return to the words of the prayer.


message 9: by Denise (new)

Denise Silver | 7 comments While waiting in doctors offices and dealing with stressful family situations, I've been trying to use the prayer with my breathing. I'm encouraged by the simplicity of the prayer. The power of Jesus name brings clarity and calmness to my situations.


message 10: by Joan (new)

Joan | 14 comments Mod
Cath wrote: "where do we download the podcasts please?"

They will be available on the Member Site at www.renovare.org. However, the first one won't be available until Sunday, November 2.


message 11: by Diane (new)

Diane Seager | 54 comments My, my, what truths we are learning. A few years ago I told my sister I wanted to learn about prayer - of course that meant finding books about prayer. The Lord has heard my cry! I believe my mind is so trained to distraction and the enemy does bombard my mind. This will require discipline and GRACE!


message 12: by Mark (new)

Mark Moore This is one of my favorite Christian classics for so many reasons. One reason is that I have a deep love for Russia and the church in Russia. I have been in a number or Orthodox churches in Russia as well as an Orthodox monastery (in the dead of winter). There is an odd mystical beauty that the Orthodox church embraces despite what seems to be its "cultural irrelevance." I think this is reflected in the Jesus prayer. When you think about it, the idea of saying, "Lord Jesus Christ, have mercy on me," 12,000 times a day does not seem like the sort of spiritual mentoring that would attract a ton of followers. Yet, in spite of how odd it seems to our complex contemporary way of thinking, there is a mystical beauty in its simplicity and its ability to constantly keep Jesus at the center of one's thoughts throughout the day.

I also find it helpful to use this prayer as a form of intercession for my family and friends. "Lord Jesus Christ, have mercy on __________." It's a great middle of the night prayer of intercession when your kids are sick, or a friend is in surgery, or when the Lord simply brings someone to your mind.


message 13: by Diane (new)

Diane Seager | 54 comments A song by John Michael Talbot came to my mind today, "Lord Have Mercy, Christ Have Mercy, Lord Have Mercy on me"! I was singing it while doing dishes and while driving in the car today.


message 14: by Joanna (new)

Joanna Gray | 3 comments I am being so very blessed by the understand of how to approach the inner prayer life. Brother Lawrence's The Practice of the Presence of God has always been my most treasured book and now this and Madame Guyon to further our hope for the inner glory of knowing our Lord on a personal level .
I think this simple prayer is so helpful because when the mind is constantly and mindlessly chattering it is easy to remember how to quickly return to thinking about God when we have drifted. I am so grateful to this delightful bookclub and the honest and heartfelt sharing.


message 15: by Melissa (new) - added it

Melissa | 27 comments While I am enjoying reading this book, I find myself skeptical of this approach to prayer. Is it really what God wants from me? Am I able to do it, or even should I try? My Western mindset is apparently very entrenched. I am asking God to show me what I need to see, hear, learn. I am eager to learn more from this Eastern Orthodox stream. The examples shared so far of practicing this prayer have been helpful in relating it to real life. Thanks for all of you walking this pilgrimage together.


Roger P | 5 comments What a brilliant idea to have this book right after Madame Guyon. Her inner prayer techniques will blend well, I think, with the Orthodox prayer of the Heart.
I read both sections of this book perhaps 10 years ago or more and it inspired me to start reading the Philokalia, which unfortunately is still not fully published in English (Volume 5 is not done yet). I would highly recommend it for people who like the Pilgrim.

I have enjoyed, this time around, taking the book in more slowly and in a meditative reading fashion. I am saying the prayer during the day, primarily silently--not up to the same volume of repetitions of the Pilgrim. What I find it that if I continue to use the prayer during times that would normally be frustrating to me (driving in traffic with a tailgater, being irritated with someone at work) that it allows me to put Jesus between the situation and my previously usual reaction. It allows me to experience a measure of peaceful "apatheia:" the detachment recommended by the writers of the Philokalia and echoes by the Pilgrim's dream on page 18 (which was a great meditative paragraph!)

I do have a series of questions , which if I am reading our introductory message correctly, may be something that would later be addressed to one of the podcasters.
In my previous readings about the Prayer of the Heart, which the Jesus prayer leads to, it has been cautioned that a person should only undertake doing this if they are under spiritual direction. This is echoed in certain sections of the early chapters of the book. I am neither Orthodox nor under formal spiritual direction currently, although I certainly have "soul friends." So does this preclude me from going more in depth as the Pilgrim does? As we progress in this book should I seek spiritual direction or just go with the flow of discussion and sharing on Goodreads? What dangers are there from just winging it alone?
Thanks, Roger B.


Kimberley | 2 comments The first sentence of the Preface (to the 2003 edition); the last three words.."where love blossoms." I knew that this would be a favorite, one that I will read, and re-read. Thanks for introducing me to The Pilgrim!


message 18: by Diane (new)

Diane Seager | 54 comments Posting a question:
When reading the Pilgrim I focus on the solitude and prayer. I by nature am someone who enjoys the peace of solitude and a hunger for a deeper union with God. My question is, "How do we balance solitude and prayer with studying scripture, worshipping in song, and praying with or serving others?" I also like the question that Roger posed about Spiritual Direction, as I do not have a Spiritual Director in my life.


message 19: by Rebecca (new)

Rebecca | 2 comments Diane wrote: "A song by John Michael Talbot came to my mind today, "Lord Have Mercy, Christ Have Mercy, Lord Have Mercy on me"! I was singing it while doing dishes and while driving in the car today."

I enjoy that song as well. :)


Louise | 26 comments The Reformed-tradition Protestant in me is actually struggling with this book. First, it seems that the Pilgrim is motivated to inner prayer as a means of salvation. I do not dispute the importance of the inner prayer life, and even of this simple, rote prayer practice. However, my motivation is to draw closer to the heart and mind of the One who has already redeemed me by his grace. Second, the prayer itself and his spiritual awareness of God are the ends of his spiritual journey. He enjoys the blessing of those who serve the poor and the sojourner but only wants to withdraw himself. While we are commanded to pray without ceasing, we are also commanded (many more times, by the way) to respond to the grace and provision of God by serving others, and prayer is His means of communicating His will to us. Surely there is a point in which love of God overflows the heart in charity for others. Finally, the Bible itself seems to have a place below the Philokalia, and while the Pilgrim takes up the Jesus Prayer, he does not also seem to have taken up the practice of meditating on Scripture that those holy fathers also advise. All that being said, I confess that I finished the book in a couple sittings and now intend to go back and reread it in smaller bites and with an open heart. Because God knows I need to nurture that inner prayer and constant awareness of his presence and love. I look forward to the podcasts as well.


message 21: by Rebecca (new)

Rebecca Browne | 1 comments Hello all--I'm starting book club participation with The Way of the Pilgrim, as I got started too late for Madame Guyon. I am having the remarkable (to me) experience of composing this comment at 38,000 feet, crossing over the southern Rockies on my way to Sacramento by way of Los Angeles, having paid the $8 fee for in-flight wi-fi. A bargain! I'm starting TWOTP by reading through the first four conversations quickly, with the intent of studying more carefully after my overview. What has initially engaged me is The Pilgrim's descriptions of life in his time and place, which is so far removed from my pleasant suburban life in the St. Louis area. I think I'm too soul-shallow and distractible for this practice. However, I'm willing to be open to the possibility that there may be something that I can attain with the aid of the Holy Spirit, and I look forward to reading what y'all have to say. Peace to all as we celebrate Samhain and rest in the dark of the year.


message 22: by Diane (new)

Diane Seager | 54 comments Louise wrote: "The Reformed-tradition Protestant in me is actually struggling with this book. First, it seems that the Pilgrim is motivated to inner prayer as a means of salvation. I do not dispute the importanc..."
Hello Louise, when the Pilgrim mentions inner prayer as a means of salvation, I interpret this as the salvation or restoration of his soul, not saying that we are not saved by Grace and the washing of the Word.
Also, I know that the Pilgrim knows the scriptures, as he references them quite a bit. He also mentions that he reads the Bible. I believe that this book focuses on his quest for understanding and experiencing inner prayer. I also believe that God did bring people in his path many times to minister to. BUT, I know what you mean, I come from the doctrine of serving and signing up for and being part of groups, witnessing teams, prayer meetings, etc. The Pilgrim's life is quite different. These books are certainly challenging me to look at my inner life and what is really important.


message 23: by Joan (new)

Joan | 14 comments Mod
Roger wrote: "What a brilliant idea to have this book right after Madame Guyon. Her inner prayer techniques will blend well, I think, with the Orthodox prayer of the Heart.
I read both sections of this book perh..."


Roger, I checked with Gary and yes, your question will be dealt with in the podcast. And Gary adds, "Yes, that would be better and the idea, but no, I don't think it is a requirement to benefit from the book." Be encouraged!!


message 24: by Bev (new)

Bev Gordon | 2 comments Louise wrote: "The Reformed-tradition Protestant in me is actually struggling with this book. First, it seems that the Pilgrim is motivated to inner prayer as a means of salvation. I do not dispute the importanc..."

Diane wrote: "Louise wrote: "The Reformed-tradition Protestant in me is actually struggling with this book. First, it seems that the Pilgrim is motivated to inner prayer as a means of salvation. I do not disput..."

I resonnate with Louise in her Reformed tradition angst! When I first encountered the Jesus Prayer all this asking for mercy bothered me. If, in Christ, we have already received the forgiveness of the Father, why do we ask for mercy. Then I heard a wonderful lecture by Fredricka Matthews Green who explained that the mercy we seek is like the care the Good Samaritan gave to the beaten man when he took him up and bound his wounds. This kind of mercy is the compassion, tender mercies and steadfast love that perseveres to save the beloved. I am the beaten one who needs the constant compassion of Jesus to pour oil on my heart that is often hard, often contemptuous of others, often selfish and lazy, often prayerless and self-sufficient.

Why do I cry for mercy if Jesus' love never stops streamming towards me? Because I keep forgetting how desperately I live in daily need it. This prayer reminds me of that and so in a sense it is confessional of both my need and His provision. He is my Lord, and I live and move by his grace and mercy.


message 25: by Diane (new)

Diane Seager | 54 comments Bev wrote: "Louise wrote: "The Reformed-tradition Protestant in me is actually struggling with this book. First, it seems that the Pilgrim is motivated to inner prayer as a means of salvation. I do not disput..."

Ooooh! Love your explanation of the "... oil on my heart that is often hard, often contemptuous of others, often selfish and lazy, often prayer less and self-sufficient"!! And, I too "... keep forgetting how desperately I live in daily need of it." Thank you Bev! (Yes, Excellent confessional of both my need and His provision)! Wow, couldn't have said it any better than that.


Chris Cahill | 12 comments A quick note for Diane and Louise (and maybe others) -

Westerners sometimes have a way of wanting to interpret spiritual texts with their left brains in high gear and their right brains in the background; the Eastern church has a way of doing it the other way around.

So if it helps, hear the word "sanctification" when you see the word "salvation" in the text.

I used to think the text was about a method of prayer, but these days I realize that the method is just a means to an end - my deeper, more intimate relationship with Jesus and His with me. I don't really care so much any more about how many repetitions of the Jesus Prayer I've done during the day - the content of the prayer, and how it draws me into the presence of the One Who loves me, is what is more important.

So let me put this out there: is it better, at the end of the day, to have said "I prayed the Jesus prayer several thousand times today, but I don't think I know Jesus any better than I did yesterday?" or to have said "I lost track of how many times I prayed the prayer, but it didn't matter because I spent some wonderful time with my Beloved?"


Chris Cahill | 12 comments A quick note for Diane and Louise (and maybe others) -

Westerners sometimes have a way of wanting to interpret spiritual texts with their left brains in high gear and their right brains in the background; the Eastern church has a way of doing it the other way around.

So if it helps, hear the word "sanctification" when you see the word "salvation" in the text.

I used to think the text was about a method of prayer, but these days I realize that the method is just a means to an end - my deeper, more intimate relationship with Jesus and His with me. I don't really care so much any more about how many repetitions of the Jesus Prayer I've done during the day - the content of the prayer, and how it draws me into the presence of the One Who loves me, is what is more important.

So let me put this out there: is it better, at the end of the day, to have said "I prayed the Jesus prayer several thousand times today, but I don't think I know Jesus any better than I did yesterday?" or to have said "I lost track of how many times I prayed the prayer, but it didn't matter because I spent some wonderful time with my Beloved?"


message 28: by Joanna (new)

Joanna Gray | 3 comments Great thoughts fromLouise , Diane and Chris--- My thoughts recently have been to this new pattern of 'first seeking the Kingdom of God within' before we approach service and if we don't perfect this inner life and are truly working in the power of the Holy Spirit we are then just doing legalistic works-- This very deep 'heart' prayer and also as Madame Guyon mentions using your mind to seek the inner prayer in our heart-- turning the prayer inwards and finding God in us-- this is hugely different from praying outwards to God in heaven-- this soul to soul connection of the Holy Spirit interceding with God through us is for me a whole new level which I dearly thirst for.It feels there is a fashion in the church to neglect the disciplines of inner connection and exhort a life of getting on and performing the Kingdom here now efforts of serving without the true seeking first the kingdom within us to direct and give us the power to perform. I don't feel its one or the other I feel it should be both but inner connection and power from the Holy Spirit should always come first. Its really a joy to share with people that seek his love.


Roger P | 5 comments Great discussions the last day. I really appreciate Chris' response to Louise and Diane. That having been said, I also find myself a little more hesitant to accept everything the Pilgrim expounds as I read this for the second time--I am doing the "slow reading" this time around. On page 23, the Pilgrim has just finished encountering the reformed alcoholic soldier who reads the Gospels everyday and they have a brief discussion about which is more important, the Gospels or the Jesus Prayer. " 'The are of equal importance,' I (the Pilgrim) answered, 'because the holy name of Jesus Christ contains within itself all the truths of the Gospel'"
I personally can't really accept the equality of the Gospels and the Jesus Prayer. If the Jesus Prayer is said without keeping the full message of the Gospels in mind then I do think it borders on becoming just a Mantra (which I believe is one of our podcast questions coming up.) I have a tendency when I read books like this one to supplement my reading with some on-line research. What I am finding is that there is not a unanimity among Orthodox scholars about taking the same approach as the Pilgrim does to the Jesus Prayer and the Prayer of the Heart. Again, if it is OK with our moderater, I would love to hear something from our 3rd podcaster about this...


Louise | 26 comments Wow, thanks to all who have responded to my earlier post. I will read "sanctification" where I see "salvation" as I read through again - that is much more comfortable theologically for me and really makes sense in the context. And I certainly need to be open to the work of the Spirit in that regard. I am using the Jesus Prayer for now because I need the discipline of turning constantly toward God as I go through each day. I think that the same principles can be applied and possibly greater benefits come from this same repetition and meditation on Scripture as is described in one of the Pilgrim's encounters later in the book.


message 31: by Darlene (new)

Darlene Hixon | 18 comments I am thankful for being introduced to this book. It's beautiful, especially if read as one pilgrim's intimate journey with his slow and overwhelming encounter with the Holy Trinity in his everyday life.

I am following the book club directives to enter this reading devotionally and for me that's meant taking the things that the pilgrim is learning in his journey and making them my own in my daily struggles with "self-protection" from hurtful or difficult people in my world.

There are many uncertainties in my life right now, and many joys and celebrations, but I'm finding the Jesus Prayer a bit like saying, "yes" to Christ's invitation to "abide" in Him when walking through these daily challenges and celebrations in life.

I have a most "irregular" and odd person in my life that I rarely need interaction with, but from time to time, this person appears in my path and I have to deal with the annoyance and awful "feelings" that I have toward this person. The Jesus Prayer walked me into having a peace and grace toward and for this person this past week.

The Jesus Prayer is a powerful summarization of he Gospels indeed: "If you abide in me, and my words abide in you, ask for whatever you wish, and it will be done for you." John 15:7

I'm thankful for the pilgrim's written journey.


message 32: by Diane (new)

Diane Seager | 54 comments Question: Do you think that the way of the Pilgrim is a calling? Not all are called to a hermitage and reciting the Jesus prayer, but we are all called to solitude, meditation, and inner prayer for a deeper union with God. I definitely have felt a calling to this way of life a few years ago (not to the extreme, as I am raising my son). Each of us is a Pilgrim meant to be led and directed by God. When I draw closer to God He directs my path as to "where to walk" this pilgrimage and "who I meet" along the way (no matter few or many).


message 33: by Joan (new)

Joan Turkus | 5 comments I find the book interesting, but "not me." My spirituality is much more "contemplative in action." I do love contemplative prayer and have belonged to the Fellowship of Contemplative Prayer in the UK for many years--the fellowship uses a saying each month--a line of scripture. My favorite is a line from Hosea: "I am God, the Holy One in the midst of thee." They also use many of the "I am" sayings of Jesus. And my life is an active one of service, so it's integrative (I try for a balance, not always easily achieved, always rebalancing.)


message 34: by Robin (new)

Robin | 21 comments Joanna wrote: "Great thoughts fromLouise , Diane and Chris--- My thoughts recently have been to this new pattern of 'first seeking the Kingdom of God within' before we approach service and if we don't perfect thi..."

I'm thinking that the Jesus Prayer is a way or a practice for me to turn my thoughts toward God (to "set your mind on things above, not on earthly things," Col. 3:2.)I have found that for me it works better if I "connect" first with God, before serving. It makes all the difference in the world, in whether or not I can serve effectively, and with a joyful heart. Going on my own ideas instead of first being inspired by God, just doesn't work for me. But then, I'm an introvert and I love solitude and silence. So I wonder if personality has something to do with it?


message 35: by Brenda (new)

Brenda Quinn | 106 comments Mod
I want to thank each one of you for the immensely helpful thoughts, questions, and sharing. I feel like this conversation is anointed by the Spirit of God to guide each of us. You've all offered so much to consider. I am eating it up.

The short passage I am thinking on this morning is part of a sentence early in the book: "heavenly light regarding continuous prayer ... is discovered in the spirit of poverty and simplicity of heart through active experience." For me, this is a packed idea, and one I am going to be sitting with for some time.


message 36: by Art (new)

Art Rader | 5 comments Bev, you quote from a lecture by Frederica Mathewes-Green. I have on my shelf a book by her entitled simply, The Jesus Prayer, which on the cover tells us that Ms. Mathewes-Green "illuminates the history, theology and spirituality of Orthodoxy, so that the prayer can be understood in its native context, and provides practical steps for making it part of your being." Perhaps this book might helpful to understand the development and use of this very helpful prayer. I have found it very useful to "keep my eyes on Jesus;" without keeping count of the number of times I have said it. Forgot to put my name at the beginning - my name is Art and am enjoying this second book.


message 37: by Susan (new)

Susan Thurman | 2 comments Chris,
Thank you for your comments. As I started this book my heart was touched for I too desire to know and be known by God in a deeper way. This feeling and sense is with me all the time. As the Pilgrim searches for a way to be in communion with God at all times, I felt his anguish! I think the willingness he has to go to any lengths to commune with God is the essence of the message here.

Your last paragraph is exactly where I landed after much meditation the last few days over chapter one. It didn't matter, because I spent some wonderful time with my beloved.

My journey in Christ has taken me many places since my evangelical upbringing, and this road is new to me, however these readings are drawing me closer to the one I love and breaking barriers that have caused me to be so judgmental in the past. May unfailing love continue to guide all of our Journeys!


message 38: by Randy (new)

Randy Holl | 3 comments Concerning seeing the prayer equal to the Gospel...this certainly challenges one to consider just what the Gospel is...and if its truly the life of God now available to us, then in a real sense, the relationship of the pilgrim (us) to Jesus when made reality through this constant prayer relationship, is the same...I wonder if we limit the Gospel definition to too narrow a meaning and severely limit its power..


message 39: by Kara (new)

Kara | 9 comments This has been an interesting first week for me. Like for many from reformed/evangelical backgrounds there area things in the pilgrim's life and words that are uncomfortable for me. I have found myself asking all week? Does this bring me closer to God? Is this really prayer if it is repeating the same thing over and over again. I certainly know that many brothers and sisters in my adopted home country of India would be concerned - this sounds like the meaningless repetition that we hear from every temple on street.

So thank you to those who have posted during the week I have found some of the clarifications really helpful in helping me to move forward. I am still not sure what I think - but am trusting that as I read and experiment with the prayer that God will help me to grow and learn as He helped the pilgrim.

I have found the pilgrims acceptance - no his embracing - of his solitary state to be rather challenging. My work and living situations are rather solitary these days and I have been fighting it (as an extrovert I normally get my energy from my interactions with people). The pilgrim is certainly pushing my buttons and making me think about whether or not there is another way to understand my current phase of life.


message 40: by Laura (new)

Laura | 1 comments Please allow me to introduce myself, Laura. Hi all; when I started reading this Pilgrim's journey, I have found I cannot put it down and have to discipline myself to not get too far ahead. The Jesus Prayer takes me back to my Catholic days, having been born and raised as such. The Ursuline Order taught us well. Am at a crossroads looking for spiritual direction and this seems to be the right place. I had fun with the Prayer this morning on my walk and found it inspiring and energizing within repeating the words with every footstep, allowing a few steps at the finish, then alternated the words to only the right leg, then the left, and so on. At the end of my walk, I found that all of a sudden I was done, energized and ready to take on the day and make it GREAT! All of this helped me feel "Spirited". So, throughout the day as I faced frustrating challenges, the Jesus Prayer was my rope. And when joy filled my heart, the Jesus Prayer was the gratitude for it. So many "ah ha" moments, such a peace filled my heart to know our Lord is just a breath within.


message 41: by Darlene (new)

Darlene Hixon | 18 comments Laura wrote: "Please allow me to introduce myself, Laura. Hi all; when I started reading this Pilgrim's journey, I have found I cannot put it down and have to discipline myself to not get too far ahead. The Jes..."
What a great blessing to read your soul's delight to walking with God and the Jesus Prayer, in quite the literal sense. I am also in love with the pilgrim and find myself thinking of his journey even when I'm not reading. Interesting huh? Blessings!


message 42: by Art (new)

Art Rader | 5 comments As I listened to the podcast and read some more in the book, I was struck by Gary Moon's reference to simplicity on the part of the pilgrim. That business of simplicity is an area I'd like to do more in - the less I have the less I have to worry about. Also, what is a "prayer rope?"


Bee Jay | 16 comments Hmm. A prayer rope is the devise used by Orthodox people to count their prayers. Google it for images and to purchase.
Or make your own: Get 50 beads whose color and texture you like from the local craft store. Find a cross in the same jewelry section and some cord to string them together. Some ropes are a straight line and some are joined back to make a circle.


message 44: by Art (new)

Art Rader | 5 comments Thank you!


message 45: by Martha (new)

Martha Cornelius | 10 comments I just received the book and started reading. I found myself wanting to read it all in one setting. I had to stop and attempt the Jesus prayer, which I just did for a very short period of time. I first was all in my head, then it started to flow into my heart which was filled with a warmth and peace. It was hard slowing down and not wanted to be doing "things" I have a long journey ahead to achieve ceaseless prayer.


Louise | 26 comments Martha, I did read it all in one sitting - and got almost nothing from it. However, with the podcasts, info sheet from Gary and personal research, I am now reading it slowly, thinking on it and praying it through. Blessings on your journey - be sure to take advantage of the additional resources.


Louise | 26 comments Martha, I did read it all in one sitting - and got almost nothing from it. However, with the podcasts, info sheet from Gary and personal research, I am now reading it slowly, thinking on it and praying it through. Blessings on your journey - be sure to take advantage of the additional resources.


Louise | 26 comments Martha, I did read it all in one sitting - and got almost nothing from it. However, with the podcasts, info sheet from Gary and personal research, I am now reading it slowly, thinking on it and praying it through. Blessings on your journey - be sure to take advantage of the additional resources.


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