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Persuasion > Chapters 23-24

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message 1: by [deleted user] (last edited Oct 26, 2014 04:33PM) (new)

The Letter


message 2: by Karlyne (new)

Karlyne Landrum | 102 comments What?!? No comments about The Letter yet?!?


message 3: by Samanta (new)

Samanta   (almacubana) Beautiful, eloquent, passionate. I love how classic authors can convey so much feeling by using completely appropriate words. :)


message 4: by QNPoohBear (new)

QNPoohBear | 69 comments The letter *sigh*! The most romantic thing I've ever read.


Anne's impassioned defense of women always make me teary eyed. I don't know if Jane Austen read The Odyssey but Penelope (ironically Mrs. Clay's first name) was the devoted wife of Odysseus who never stopped loving him and waiting for him.

The letter kills me every time. It's so romantic! "I am half agony, half hope!" He was listening to hard to Anne's conversation and she was trying to hard to make sure he was listening and understood what she was saying. I do think the letter was necessary. The story doesn't work as well in the original form. You can go read the canceled chapters online and see what you think. The letter also doesn't work in contemporary retellings. No one writes letters anymore let alone love letters like that *sigh.*

I underlined this "I was six weeks with Edward," said he, "and saw him happy. I could have no other pleasure. I deserved none. He enquired after you very particularly; asked even if you were personally altered, little suspecting that to my eye you could never alter.

"Anne smiled, and let it pass. It was too pleasing a blunder for a reproach. It is something for a woman to be assured, in her eight-and-twentieth year, that she has not lost one charm of earlier youth: but the value of such homage was inexpressibly increased to Anne, by comparing it with former words, and feeling it to be the result, not the cause, of a revival of his warm attachment."
We started to discuss this earlier. Was he punishing her? Did he find her so altered? Was she actually physically different? I think she was supposed to look different than she did at 19. The bloom had worn off and she was no longer young and attractive. Years of dealing with her idiot father and silly sisters left her careworn. Pining away for her lost love didn't help.

I love how Anne and Wentworth are alone in their own little world as they walk along the gravel walk. They are oblivious to anything else. The 1995 movie scene is very cute although not very historically accurate. Good thing they were walking UP the gravel walk or they may have fallen off it the way I did. I took a nasty tumble into Gay street because I was busy dreaming of Anne and Wentworth.

I just love the romance of this novel. All the emotions are so raw and so much on the surface. The ending is wonderful and my only complaint is that it's too short.


message 5: by Marquise (new)

Marquise I read the letter, reread it, and then reread it again!
That letter is very much one of the reasons I wish letter-writing were still fashionable! Men of today are still capable of being Wentworths, but . . . there is rarely a way of keeping their gestures in physical form for posterity.

Besides the obvious "half agony, half hope" declaration of feelings and his admission that he'd never stopped loving her in all those years despite trying to talk himself out of it, the best highlight in that letter is Wentworth's very honest admission of hurt and disagreeable feelings. He tells Anne he may have been unjust, that he had felt resentful, etc. And that honesty continues when they take that walk in the gravel, both going through their feelings over their failed fist engagement and the consequences quite maturely and with a cool head. I just love how they don't hurl reproaches at each other! They both admit their portion of blame if there's one and admitting to resentment. Wentworth even admits that it will take time to forgive Lady Russell, which is good, because it'd not be realistic if suddenly all ill feelings were gone just because they are reunited at last. After all, it's been eight years and that has still to be digested.

The Mrs Clay and Mr Elliot twist was supposed to be a surprise? I did see that coming from afar, it had been telegraphed when Mrs Smith told Anne William was bent on preventing Sir Walter from having another wife, with the potential son he might sire on her, so taking her away was to be guessed. It just served to pile up more "villainy" on William, but at the same time serves to justify why Anne had that attitude towards Mrs Clay.


message 6: by Karlyne (new)

Karlyne Landrum | 102 comments Marquise wrote: "I read the letter, reread it, and then reread it again!
That letter is very much one of the reasons I wish letter-writing were still fashionable! Men of today are still capable of being Wentworths,..."


Poor Mrs. Clay! I guess even she couldn't take Sir Walter for always. When William showed up with some charm pointed her direction, she lost all conniving self-interest. I don't think she was dumb enough to really think that he was going to marry her; it had to be obvious that he wasn't as foolish as Sir Walter. I wonder where she ended up...


message 7: by QNPoohBear (last edited Oct 24, 2015 07:10PM) (new)

QNPoohBear | 69 comments That letter ... SIGH!!! It's my favorite part of the novel - actually the whole scene before it when Anne is discussing female constancy with Capt. Harville to the letter is the best part. That's the reason why I don't like the 2009 adaptation because they chop it all up and make Anne speak words she never would have spoken that early in the story. The letter is the reason why modern adaptations of the novel don't work. No one writes love letters and an e-mail just isn't the same. What next - love letter by text? UGH.

Mrs. Clay is the real loser in the novel. She will lose her respectability by becoming the mistress of William. No chance of making a good marriage unless she can make him marry her.

My pictures of Bath relating to Persuasion can be found here - I hope.
http://share.shutterfly.com/action/we...


message 8: by Marquise (last edited Oct 24, 2015 08:09PM) (new)

Marquise QNPoohBear wrote: "That letter ... SIGH!!! It's my favorite part of the novel - actually the whole scene before it when Anne is discussing female constancy with Capt. Harville to the letter is the best part. That's t..."

I join you in the feeling! That was by far the best chapter in the novel, the buildup leading to the letter is just superb writing as well.

I can see why you'd dislike the alterations in the screen adaptation. I don't plan to watch any of the existing films, personally. I've long been scarred by terrible adaptations of my favourite works that I am not exactly anxious for watching film versions of any of them, and rarely do so. Your email comment made me smile. Just trying to think how it'd be in a modern setting sends me into fits of giggles! Can you imagine some modern Wentworth in camouflage Navy uniform busily texting something like . . . let me think...

"Hey, bb! 4give me, plz. I <3 u so much. Want 2b w/u bad. Reply ASAP, k? bye."

The horror...! :D


Tadiana ✩Night Owl☽ | 108 comments Mod
Delurking to say that your text version of Wentworth's letter cracked me up, Marquise!


Andrea AKA Catsos Person (catsosperson) | 70 comments How odious and insufferable Elizabeth must be that Wm Elliot would rather do something shady like take Mrs. Clay "under his protection" to prevent Sir Walter from marrying her than to marry Elizabeth himself?

I imagine since Sir Walter loves his eldest daughter so much that if Wm had married her, Sir Walter would have remained an unattached widower so that his favorite could be Lady Elliot.

She must be just horrid in general.

Karlyne, your text/love letter is hilarious!


message 11: by Marquise (new)

Marquise Tadiana ✩ Night Owl☽ wrote: "Delurking to say that your text version of Wentworth's letter cracked me up, Marquise!"

Thanks! :D


Andrea AKA Catsos Person (catsosperson) | 70 comments Oops sorry Marquise, I meant to say YOUR text of the love letter was hilarious!

Sorry for the blunder. I had just woken up.

:)


message 13: by Karlyne (new)

Karlyne Landrum | 102 comments Andrea (Catsos Person) is a Compulsive eBook Hoarder wrote: "Oops sorry Marquise, I meant to say YOUR text of the love letter was hilarious!

Sorry for the blunder. I had just woken up.

:)"


I loved it, too, even if I didn't write it, especially the "reply ASAP, k?" Like, awesome, dude!


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