Nobel Prize Winners discussion

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Debate > Nobel or Noble?

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message 1: by [deleted user] (last edited Oct 25, 2014 07:19AM) (new)

Here's an interesting view of the Prize. Please don't hesitate to comment on the article.


message 2: by Sarah (new)

Sarah | 3 comments Thanks for linking this David, the article is an interesting read. I think that this part is especially interesting:

"In the early days of the prize, Leo Tolstoy, Emile Zola and Mark Twain were considered but rejected, while James Joyce, probably the greatest novelist of the 20th century but also an unabashed blasphemer, never won it. Salman Rushdie, whose work will still be read in 200 years, will almost certainly never win either, and for similar reasons."

It is clearly stated that the Nobel is awarded to: “in the field of literature the most outstanding work in an ideal direction", leaving it to the Nobel committee to define "outstanding" and "ideal direction". Looking at past winners it seems that the Nobel is awarded based on a combination of literary merit and noble ideals, sometimes at the expense of great authors whose message is not seen as being noble enough.


message 3: by [deleted user] (new)

Sarah wrote: "Thanks for linking this David, the article is an interesting read. I think that this part is especially interesting:

"In the early days of the prize, Leo Tolstoy, Emile Zola and Mark Twain were co..."


Funny he mentions Salman Rushdie, I've read three or four works by Rushdie in the last couple of years culminating in his 'The Ground Beneath Her Feet' in July/August of this year, and I have wondered why he is so rarely mentioned as a possible laureate. Is he considered simply too much of a diplomatic liability even for a country as liberal as Sweden?


message 4: by Sarah (new)

Sarah | 3 comments The Nobel committee seem to avoid honouring writers with controversial political beliefs. Jorge Luis Borges and Chinua Achebe are two examples I know of, I think that Rushdie would fall under the same "politically difficult" classification.


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