Great Middle Grade Reads discussion

note: This topic has been closed to new comments.
25 views
ARCHIVES > Nominations for November: HISTORICAL

Comments Showing 1-22 of 22 (22 new)    post a comment »
dateDown arrow    newest »

message 1: by M.G. (last edited Oct 24, 2014 11:47AM) (new)

M.G. King (mgking) | 728 comments How about historical fiction picks for this month? Maybe it's because it's the end of the year, or maybe it's because the holidays are right around the corner, but for whatever reason, fall and winter always have me thinking about tradition and stories from the past.

Middle grade historical fiction can help put history into context for children who might find the straight form of history a little dry. Nominate your favorite titles!


message 2: by Rebecca (new)

Rebecca Douglass (rdouglass) | 1662 comments Mod
Oh boy, this is a huge category for me--I love historical kids' fiction. I have learned so much from it! Instead of trying to think of my favorites, I'm going to sit back and hope others tip me off to some new books :)


message 3: by Cheryl is busier irl atm. (last edited Oct 27, 2014 08:00PM) (new)

Cheryl is busier irl atm. (cherylllr) I host the Newbery club on Children's Books, so I wind up reading *lots* of this genre. But I did just find, at a thrift store, one I'd never heard of, that looks interesting and valuable:

At Her Majesty's Request An African Princess in Victorian England by Walter Dean Myers At Her Majesty's Request: An African Princess in Victorian England by none other than Walter Dean Myers.


message 4: by Jemima (new)

Jemima Pett | 1350 comments Mod
The Children of the New Forest by Captain Marryat was one of my favourites as a kid, but it may be too old and too British for you (kids in the English Civil War, i.e. Roundheads and Cavaliers). I was a staunch royalist when I was a kid - would have been a Cromwellian a little later. :)


message 5: by Maranda (new)

Maranda Russell | 48 comments I really enjoyed Hitler's Daughter. It is written in such an interesting way and really makes you think.


message 6: by Janet (new)

Janet Macreery | 11 comments Fever 1793 (Philadelphia yellow fever outbreak), Chains (start of the American Revolution), or Forge (American Revolution) by Laurie Halse Anderson. All MG HF, all great.


message 7: by Rebecca (new)

Rebecca Douglass (rdouglass) | 1662 comments Mod
Jemima wrote: "The Children of the New Forest by Captain Marryat was one of my favourites as a kid, but it may be too old and too British for you (kids in the English Civil War, i.e. Roundheads and ..."

I have to hunt this up. I do love old British children's books!


Cheryl is busier irl atm. (cherylllr) Marryat's book is avl on Project Gutenberg, free to read online or download.


message 9: by Rebecca (new)

Rebecca Douglass (rdouglass) | 1662 comments Mod
Cheryl wrote: "Marryat's book is avl on Project Gutenberg, free to read online or download."

Thanks! If I can't get it elsewhere, I'll go there (though I often have trouble getting downloads there that are readable on the Nook).


message 10: by Gita (new)

Gita Reddy | 86 comments The Children of the New Forest was one of my favourites also. Apart from the history it is a sort of coming of age book because the children learn to adapt to a different way of life.


message 11: by Justine (new)

Justine Laismith (justinelaismith) | 304 comments I think I'm going to have trouble voting this month. I want to read everything!


message 12: by Maranda (last edited Oct 26, 2014 05:41PM) (new)

Maranda Russell | 48 comments Just a warning, The Children of the New Forest might be really hard to find for some of us in the US. It isn't carried by any of the libraries near me and we have a huge library system. And I know many people don't like reading ebooks or books online.


message 13: by M.G. (new)

M.G. King (mgking) | 728 comments So many great suggestions!

I've been mulling over my own personal nomination for the month, and decided that I have to throw a Richard Peck favorite into the mix, Here Lies the Librarian. It defies the expectation that historical fiction has to be serious. This one includes a tomboy auto mechanic in the early 1900s -- lots of laugh out loud moments, and even a car race or two.


message 14: by M.G. (new)

M.G. King (mgking) | 728 comments Will keep the nominations thread open through today, before posting the poll tomorrow.

Keep those suggestions coming!


message 15: by Stephen (last edited Oct 27, 2014 09:37AM) (new)

Stephen Moore I too have a liking for The Children of the New Forest. However, when it comes to historical novels I just have to return to one of my favourite books of all time, The Machine-Gunners by Robert Westall. It's set in Northern England during World War Two; when Westall was a child, so his portrayal of the period is spot on. It's all about what a bunch of kids get up to when they liberate a working machine gun from a crashed fighter airplane and decide to help the war effort!


message 16: by Rebecca (last edited Oct 27, 2014 11:40AM) (new)

Rebecca Douglass (rdouglass) | 1662 comments Mod
M.G. wrote: "So many great suggestions!

I've been mulling over my own personal nomination for the month, and decided that I have to throw a Richard Peck favorite into the mix, Here Lies the Librarian

Great choice! I support any by Peck.

For my own nomination, I'll throw in Rodzina


message 17: by Alexis (new)

Alexis Seidl | 2 comments There are so many different books that I could nominate. Historical fiction is probably one of my favorite genres to read. One nomination that I will throw out there is The Watsons Go to Birmingham—1963


message 18: by Justine (last edited Oct 27, 2014 05:45PM) (new)

Justine Laismith (justinelaismith) | 304 comments If The Children of the New Forest is not easily accessible, then I would suggest I, Coriander as it's also set in the era of Royalists and Roundheads.
I'm also quite a big fan of Twist of Gold about the Irish famine that drove many to the US, and Alone on a Wide Wide Sea about orphans being shipped from England to Australia after the WW2.


message 19: by Rebecca (new)

Rebecca Douglass (rdouglass) | 1662 comments Mod
Justine wrote: "If The Children of the New Forest is not easily accessible, then I would suggest I, Coriander as it's also set in the era of Royalists and Roundheads.
I'm also quite a b..."


Wow, Justine, Alone on a Wide Wide Sea sounds amazing. I will definitely read it.


message 20: by K.L. (new)

K.L. Pickett | 7 comments M.G. wrote: "How about historical fiction picks for this month? Maybe it's because it's the end of the year, or maybe it's because the holidays are right around the corner, but for whatever reason, fall and win..."


message 21: by K.L. (new)

K.L. Pickett | 7 comments How about Indian Captive by Lois Lenski? I read it to my fourth grade class every year. It is a wonderful (and true) story.


message 22: by M.G. (new)

M.G. King (mgking) | 728 comments I'm going to have to run to the library later to see how many of these titles I can find -- they all sound great! In the meantime, I'll set up the poll and let everyone vote on the one we'll discuss this month. Thanks for all the good suggestions.


back to top
This topic has been frozen by the moderator. No new comments can be posted.