Reading 1001 discussion

33 views
Past Special Events/Challenges > Banned Book Week Challenge

Comments Showing 1-39 of 39 (39 new)    post a comment »
dateDown arrow    newest »

message 1: by Diane (last edited Oct 13, 2019 08:19PM) (new)

Diane Zwang | 1189 comments Mod
Banned Book Week (September 22-28) Challenge

You may read one book from the list of banned 1001 books. I used this site to obtain my information. http://www.ala.org/advocacy/bbooks/fr... This challenge runs from September 22 to October 22. Scoring 3 points for one book. No time to read? No problem. Tell us about your favorite banned book or other such information for 1 point. Total points for this challenge is 4.

1984 by George Orwell
Beloved by Toni Morrison
Brave New World by Aldous Huxley
The Call of the Wild by Jack London
Catch-22 by Joseph Heller
The Catcher in the Rye by J.D. Salinger
A Clockwork Orange by Anthony Burgess
The Color Purple by Alice Walker
A Farewell to Arms by Ernest Hemingway
Gone with the Wind by Margaret Mitchell
The Grapes of Wrath by John Steinbeck
The Great Gatsby by F.Scott Fitzgerald
Lolita by Vladimir Nabokov
Lord of the Flies by William Golding
The Lord of the Rings by J.R.R Tolkien
One Flew Over the Cuckoo's Nest by Ken Kesey
To Kill a Mockingbird by Harper Lee
Tropic of Cancer by Henry Miller
Ulysses by James Joyce
Of Mice and Men by John Steinbeck
Animal Farm by George Orwell
The Sun Also Rises by Earnest Hemingway
Their Eyes Were Watching God by Zora Neale Hurston
Invisible Man by Ralph Ellison
Song of Solomon by Toni Morrison
Native Son by Richard Wright
Slaughterhouse Five by Kurt Vonnegut
For Whom the Bell Tolls by Ernest Hemingway
Go Tell It on the Mountain by James Baldwin
The Jungle by Upton Sinclair
Lady Chatterley's Lover by D.H. Lawrence
The Awakening by Kate Chopin
In Cold Blood by Truman Capote
Sons and Lovers by D.H. Lawrence
Cat's Cradle by Kurt Vonnegut
Naked Lunch by William Burroughs
Brideshead Revisited by Evelyn Waugh
Women in Love by D.H. Lawrence
Rabbit, Run by John Updike


message 2: by Gail (new)

Gail (gailifer) | 1184 comments Great idea Diane. I can’t imagine why some of these were banned but it will be fun to read one with that thought in mind.


message 3: by Amanda (new)

Amanda Dawn | 887 comments cool idea Diane! Finally going to read In Cold Blood for this. Stoked!


message 4: by Diane (new)

Diane Zwang | 1189 comments Mod
Amanda wrote: "cool idea Diane! Finally going to read In Cold Blood for this. Stoked!"

I loved In Cold Blood. Glad you will be able to read it. My son will read it for 11th grade English this year.


message 5: by Diane (new)

Diane Zwang | 1189 comments Mod
Gail wrote: "Great idea Diane. I can’t imagine why some of these were banned but it will be fun to read one with that thought in mind."

The link site tells you why the book was banned and where.


message 6: by Celia (last edited Sep 21, 2019 12:27PM) (new)

Celia (cinbread19) | 127 comments This IS a great idea Diane. I will try to read Brideshead Revisited for this challenge. (I say TRY because I have so many books scheduled for this month. I am over-booked!!)
Update: Maybe I WILL be able to finish this book and have added it for October.
Kisses and Kudos to you!!


message 7: by Connie (last edited Sep 21, 2019 01:01PM) (new)

Connie D | 91 comments Wow! So many good books are banned, and I can't remember why! I've read:

Beloved by Toni Morrison
Brave New World by Aldous Huxley
The Call of the Wild by Jack London
The Catcher in the Rye by J.D. Salinger
The Color Purple by Alice Walker
A Farewell to Arms by Ernest Hemingway
Gone with the Wind by Margaret Mitchell
The Grapes of Wrath by John Steinbeck
The Great Gatsby by F.Scott Fitzgerald
Lord of the Flies by William Golding
The Lord of the Rings by J.R.R Tolkien
To Kill a Mockingbird by Harper Lee
Of Mice and Men by John Steinbeck
Animal Farm by George Orwell
The Sun Also Rises by Earnest Hemingway
Their Eyes Were Watching God by Zora Neale Hurston
Invisible Man by Ralph Ellison
Slaughterhouse Five by Kurt Vonnegut
For Whom the Bell Tolls by Ernest Hemingway
Lady Chatterley's Lover by D.H. Lawrence
The Awakening by Kate Chopin
In Cold Blood by Truman Capote

There were rapes in a few, but not, as I remember, with violent detail. Rapes occur in real life, and those don't disappear just because we've banned them, unfortunately. Several of these books had coarse language, some sexual language, discussions, and imaginings...Hmm.


message 8: by Valerie (new)

Valerie Brown | 495 comments I've read 16 of those on the list! Some it really is hard to imagine what caused them to be banned; others it's very easy to see why they were banned (ha, ha....). In fact many of them ended up being 4 or 5* reads for me.

There are many stand outs on that list - such as Lord of the Rings (basically my all time fave book). But I'll mention two that I read within the last few years:

The Jungle - super intense and difficult to read because of the subject matter (not the writing).

For Whom the Bell Tolls - I was already a fan of Hemingway, and this book cemented my fandom. The book is 400 boring pages and 70 INTENSE pages - much as I imagine war is (long, long periods of excruciating waiting for something to happen and then something does happen).


Kelly_Hunsaker_reads ... | 894 comments I love this idea! I am planning a reread of The Grapes of Wrath in October anyway, so it will be that one.

These are the ones I have read at least once:

1984 by George Orwell
Beloved by Toni Morrison

The Call of the Wild by Jack London


A Clockwork Orange by Anthony Burgess
The Color Purple by Alice Walker
A Farewell to Arms by Ernest Hemingway
Gone with the Wind by Margaret Mitchell
The Grapes of Wrath by John Steinbeck
The Great Gatsby by F.Scott Fitzgerald
Lolita by Vladimir Nabokov
Lord of the Flies by William Golding

One Flew Over the Cuckoo's Nest by Ken Kesey
To Kill a Mockingbird by Harper Lee


Of Mice and Men by John Steinbeck

The Sun Also Rises by Earnest Hemingway

Invisible Man by Ralph Ellison

Native Son by Richard Wright
Slaughterhouse Five by Kurt Vonnegut
For Whom the Bell Tolls by Ernest Hemingway


Lady Chatterley's Lover by D.H. Lawrence
The Awakening by Kate Chopin
In Cold Blood by Truman Capote

Cat's Cradle by Kurt Vonnegut
Naked Lunch by William Burroughs
Brideshead Revisited by Evelyn Waugh
Women in Love by D.H. Lawrence
Rabbit, Run by John Updike


message 10: by Diane (last edited Sep 21, 2019 03:44PM) (new)

Diane | 1903 comments I am already doing this challenge in another group, but it is a different set of banned books. There are only 5 I haven't read, so I will probably read either For Whom the Bell Tolls, which I am overdue to read, or Naked Lunch or Tropic of Cancer, two that I want to get behind me.


message 11: by Diane (new)

Diane Zwang | 1189 comments Mod
Diane wrote: "I am already doing this challenge in another group, but it is a different set of banned books. There are only 5 I haven't read, so I will probably read either For Whom the Bell Tolls, ..."

I am glad that you found something that you had not read since the Halloween Challenge you did. :)


message 12: by George P. (last edited Sep 22, 2019 07:45PM) (new)

George P. | 399 comments If I were reading one of these this week, it would be Native Son by Richard Wright. I just don't think I can manage a 500 page book this week; I want to work on finishing the five I'm already reading :)
The one I've read most recently is Go Tell it on the Mountain which I just finished in June, so I have at least read one this year.


message 13: by Diane (new)

Diane Zwang | 1189 comments Mod
George P. wrote: "If I were reading one of these this week, it would be Native Son by Richard Wright. I just don't think I can manage a 500 page book this week; I want to work on finishing the five I'm already readi..."

Wow 5 books that is a lot of reading. The challenge runs until October 22 if you are so inclined. Happy reading.


message 14: by George P. (last edited Sep 23, 2019 08:51PM) (new)

George P. | 399 comments Diane wrote: "The challenge runs until October 22 if you are so inclined. Happy reading."

I think I can do that- didn't notice that the challenge ran that long. I'm moving Native Son near the top of my list now.


message 15: by Gail (new)

Gail (gailifer) | 1184 comments I am supposed to read Tropic of Cancer off my Random List and I keep putting it off. However, it would be a great book for Banned.


message 16: by Jamie (new)

Jamie Barringer (Ravenmount) (ravenmount) | 423 comments Fun idea.
These are the ones I've read so far-
1984 by George Orwell (good, worth reading)
Beloved by Toni Morrison (excellent, definitely recommended)
Brave New World by Aldous Huxley (good, worth reading)
The Call of the Wild by Jack London
Catch-22 by Joseph Heller (good, worth reading)
The Catcher in the Rye by J.D. Salinger (awful, not recommended)
A Clockwork Orange by Anthony Burgess
The Color Purple by Alice Walker (excellent, definitely recommended)
The Grapes of Wrath by John Steinbeck (excellent, definitely recommended)
The Great Gatsby by F.Scott Fitzgerald
Lord of the Flies by William Golding (awful, not recommended)
The Lord of the Rings by J.R.R Tolkien (excellent, definitely recommended)
To Kill a Mockingbird by Harper Lee (good, worth reading)
Tropic of Cancer by Henry Miller (awful, not recommended)
Ulysses by James Joyce (awful, not recommended)
Of Mice and Men by John Steinbeck (good, worth reading)
Animal Farm by George Orwell (excellent, definitely recommended)
The Sun Also Rises by Earnest Hemingway
Their Eyes Were Watching God by Zora Neale Hurston
Invisible Man by Ralph Ellison (good, worth reading)
Song of Solomon by Toni Morrison (excellent, definitely recommended)
Slaughterhouse Five by Kurt Vonnegut (good, worth reading)
The Jungle by Upton Sinclair (good, worth reading)
Cat's Cradle by Kurt Vonnegut
The Awakening by Kate Chopin
Lady Chatterley's Lover by D.H. Lawrence
Sons and Lovers by D.H. Lawrence
Women in Love by D.H. Lawrence (I got tired of Lawrence's romantic stories, which are awfully formulaic.)

Of the rest, these are the ones I own copies of:
Native Son by Richard Wright
In Cold Blood by Truman Capote (on my TBR Takedown shelf)
Rabbit, Run by John Updike

and I was intending to reread this one soon-
Their Eyes Were Watching God by Zora Neale Hurston


message 17: by Tracy (new)

Tracy (tstan) | 554 comments Wow- I’ve read all of them. I don’t think that’s ever happened before!
Nanner nanner, book banning establishment!


message 18: by Diane (new)

Diane Zwang | 1189 comments Mod
Tracy wrote: "Wow- I’ve read all of them. I don’t think that’s ever happened before!
Nanner nanner, book banning establishment!"


Congratulations, Tracy. How many have you read off the list now?


message 19: by Tracy (new)

Tracy (tstan) | 554 comments I’m up to 928. I’ve been reading 10/month this year, to try to cut it down more. Audio from Scribd and LibriVox really help, because I can listen while I work.


message 20: by Diane (new)

Diane Zwang | 1189 comments Mod
Tracy wrote: "I’m up to 928. I’ve been reading 10/month this year, to try to cut it down more. Audio from Scribd and LibriVox really help, because I can listen while I work."

Wow is that impressive.


Kelly_Hunsaker_reads ... | 894 comments Tracy wrote: "I’m up to 928. I’ve been reading 10/month this year, to try to cut it down more. Audio from Scribd and LibriVox really help, because I can listen while I work."

Wow! Thats impressive!


message 22: by Valerie (new)

Valerie Brown | 495 comments Tracy wrote: "I’m up to 928. I’ve been reading 10/month this year, to try to cut it down more. Audio from Scribd and LibriVox really help, because I can listen while I work."

Wow!, and yes, that IS impressive!


message 23: by Gail (new)

Gail (gailifer) | 1184 comments Unbelievable Tracy. I fully intend to live to 134 which is what the app says I need to do to finish all the books at the rate I am going.


message 24: by Jen (new)

Jen | 116 comments Tracy wrote: "I’m up to 928. I’ve been reading 10/month this year, to try to cut it down more. Audio from Scribd and LibriVox really help, because I can listen while I work."

incredible!!


message 25: by Diane (new)

Diane Zwang | 1189 comments Mod
Gail wrote: "Unbelievable Tracy. I fully intend to live to 134 which is what the app says I need to do to finish all the books at the rate I am going."

LOL, Gail. I love it!


message 26: by Book (new)

Book Wormy | 1815 comments Mod
These are the ones I have read

1984 by George Orwell
Brave New World by Aldous Huxley
The Call of the Wild by Jack London
Catch-22 by Joseph Heller
The Catcher in the Rye by J.D. Salinger
A Clockwork Orange by Anthony Burgess
The Color Purple by Alice Walker
A Farewell to Arms by Ernest Hemingway
Gone with the Wind by Margaret Mitchell
The Grapes of Wrath by John Steinbeck
The Great Gatsby by F.Scott Fitzgerald
Lolita by Vladimir Nabokov
Lord of the Flies by William Golding
The Lord of the Rings by J.R.R Tolkien
One Flew Over the Cuckoo's Nest by Ken Kesey
To Kill a Mockingbird by Harper Lee
Ulysses by James Joyce
Of Mice and Men by John Steinbeck
Animal Farm by George Orwell
Their Eyes Were Watching God by Zora Neale Hurston
Invisible Man by Ralph Ellison
Slaughterhouse Five by Kurt Vonnegut
The Jungle by Upton Sinclair
The Awakening by Kate Chopin
In Cold Blood by Truman Capote
Sons and Lovers by D.H. Lawrence
Brideshead Revisited by Evelyn Waugh
Women in Love by D.H. Lawrence
Rabbit, Run by John Updike

I aim to read - Beloved


message 27: by Tracy (new)

Tracy (tstan) | 554 comments Book wrote: "These are the ones I have read

1984 by George Orwell
Brave New World by Aldous Huxley
The Call of the Wild by Jack London
Catch-22 by Joseph Heller
The Catcher in the Rye by J.D. Salinger
A Clockw..."


Dang! Take that, book banners!


message 28: by George P. (last edited Oct 01, 2019 06:14PM) (new)

George P. | 399 comments Tracy wrote: "I’m up to 928. I’ve been reading 10/month this year, to try to cut it down more....."

That's only three times as many as I've read :) ...rather amazing actually.

BTW, I am reading Native Son, and am 1/5th in to it. I can already see what might have led to it being banned back then (1940).
I've read most of the books on this list.


message 29: by Gail (new)

Gail (gailifer) | 1184 comments In 1964, the US Supreme Court declared that the book I read for our banned book challenge to be non-obscene. However, I struggled to get through the constant use of the c word instead of the word woman, prostitute, girl, or female. Also, the author’s view of women is fairly strictly kept to what sexual use they may have, although he does think nostalgically of his wife who sends him money wires while evidently starving herself. He uses this money on prostitutes. It was a struggle but I persisted:
The Tropic of Cancer by Henry Miller is an exuberant meditation on his life during the early 1930’s in Paris. He struggles with being out of work, hungry, often without a place to stay and if he does land a place to stay it is invariably with an equally desperate friend living in a seedy hellhole. He vacillates between depression and the thrill of living life to the fullest within his extremely limited means. His philosophy of this era being the end of civilization as we know it and the wish to blast the last rotten vestiges of it to atoms through his writing with no holds barred, comes through loud and clear. I wonder if he despaired when his work became “Literature” with a capital L....I think the man who lived in Paris during the 30’s would have preferred to have his book be obscene. It was banned in the US until the Supreme Court ruling which resulted in many other books being cleared to be published.


message 30: by Diane (new)

Diane | 1903 comments Gail wrote: "In 1964, the US Supreme Court declared that the book I read for our banned book challenge to be non-obscene. However, I struggled to get through the constant use of the c word instead of the word w..."

Ha, I'm reading the same book!


message 31: by Amanda (new)

Amanda Dawn | 887 comments I listened to In Cold Blood for this challenge (which made me happy I was hoping to get to this one in for a while now). The only other ones I hadn't read previously on the list were Tropic of Cancer and Song of Solomon.

2 of my favorite books of all time are on the list: The Color Purple and Brideshead Revisited. The Color Purple is such a heartbreaking and beautiful story about trauma, resilience, racism and misogyny, love and the human condition. There's a part in it where Sug says something to the effect of "I think it's a sin to see the color purple in nature and think nothing of it", and that blew me away when I first read it because I was also reading Plato's symposium around this time and it was really like Socrates' idea of the "divine Beauty" but in such such a different context, really lending credence to the idea that people from all walks of life can be profound whether our society recognises it or not. But, given the degree of sexual trauma and sexual non-trauma in the book, I can see why certain people would move for it to be banned (they are wrong, but whatever...)

I'm not sure exactly why Brideshead Revistied would be on there, and that kind of makes me laugh lol. I guess a lot of "uncouth" things are hinted at but its so ...subtexty...and Catholic XD.

As far as In Cold blood goes, I loved it as well. It was banned at different points in 2 different states after teachers had requested to add it to their curriculums. Based on what I found, it was challenged on the basis of being too graphic for teenage students with respect to describing a (real life) brutal murder, as well as for swearing and other adult content. In both cases, the ban was overturned.

As for the book itself, I thought it was remarkable and gave it 5 stars. The way the tension builds before the crime occurs was so masterfully done, and the way Capote delves into the early lives and psyches of the killers was really fascinating.

I totally understand why the book is on the list too, given that it really created the true crime genre.


message 32: by Diane (new)

Diane Zwang | 1189 comments Mod
Just a reminder that this challenge ends October 22nd.


message 33: by George P. (last edited Oct 19, 2019 06:38PM) (new)

George P. | 399 comments Finished Native Son. I thought it a pretty powerful book emotionally and sociologically. The last part has less "story" and drops the emotion level but more sociological. There are a couple sex scenes with the main character and his girlfriend and some graphic violence which would account for the banning.

That leaves nine on this list I haven't read. I plan to read The Call of the Wild next year and I'll probably read The Jungle some day, it's been on my to-read list a while.


message 34: by Book (new)

Book Wormy | 1815 comments Mod
Here is what Wiki says about my banned book choice:

"Beloved has been banned from five U.S. schools since 2007. Common reasons for censorship include bestiality, infanticide, sex, and violence. In 2017, Beloved was considered for removal from the Fairfax County (VA) senior English reading list due to a parent's complaint that “the book includes scenes of violent sex, including a gang rape, and was too graphic and extreme for teenagers”.[34] Parental concern about Beloved's content inspired the “Beloved Bill”, legislation that, if passed, would require Virginia public schools to notify parents of any “sexually explicit content” and provide an alternative assignment if requested"

For a book to have this much influence it must be pretty powerful stuff and having finished it with 1 day to spare I can say yes this is a powerful book.

I am going to have to go away and think about it before I write a full review because honestly a lot of things about the story have confused me.

I appreciated the switching narration which moved from present to past and from character to character. Traumatic events are revealed little by little and that has a powerful impact as the reader has to read between the lines to understand the full horror of what actually occurred.

While Sethe may have been vilified by her neighbours I can't honestly say I blame her for the decision she made regarding Beloved and her other children.

This is not a book you can say you have enjoyed however it is a book that should be read and not banned.


message 35: by Jamie (last edited Oct 21, 2019 03:51PM) (new)

Jamie Barringer (Ravenmount) (ravenmount) | 423 comments I reread Their Eyes Were Watching God this week for this challenge. I read it the first time when I was about 12, so I am sure a lot of this story went way over my head then. I watched enough livestream feeds during hurricanes since then to be able to imagine what Janie was hearing and experiencing during the hurricane, at least. I am not all that sure why anyone would bother banning this book, but I doubt many kids really absorb as much of this book as they might as adult readers.

So now I still need to finish these ones to have this list of banned books finished-

A Farewell to Arms by Ernest Hemingway
Gone with the Wind by Margaret Mitchell
Lolita by Vladimir Nabokov
One Flew Over the Cuckoo's Nest by Ken Kesey
Native Son by Richard Wright
For Whom the Bell Tolls by Ernest Hemingway
Go Tell It on the Mountain by James Baldwin
In Cold Blood by Truman Capote
Naked Lunch by William Burroughs
Brideshead Revisited by Evelyn Waugh
Rabbit, Run by John Updike


message 36: by Diane (new)

Diane | 1903 comments Diane wrote: "Just a reminder that this challenge ends October 22nd."

I finished my book a couple of weeks ago but I have absolutely no time to review it, unfortunately. Life is far too busy for me right now.


message 37: by Diane (new)

Diane Zwang | 1189 comments Mod
Diane wrote: "Diane wrote: "Just a reminder that this challenge ends October 22nd."

I finished my book a couple of weeks ago but I have absolutely no time to review it, unfortunately. Life is far too busy for m..."


Diane let us know what book you read and a star rating then you can claim your points. Hope life gets better.


message 38: by Diane (new)

Diane | 1903 comments I also read Tropic of Cancer by Henry Miller. It was banned for 30 years in the US, making Miller one of the most censored authors. It is obvious why this one was banned. It was highly obscene for its time. I have been dreading this book for a long time since I am not a fan of foul language, debauchery, and misogyny. It wasn't nearly as graphic as I anticipated though. The language was foul, however, and women were almost always referred to by derogatory and sexually-degrading terms.

As repelling as all this sounds, it actually wasn't horrible. I think Miller is a talented writer and this was certainly an important book due to its candid views on sexuality and use of free association. I found it interesting that once the book finally was available in the US it quickly sold one million copies - only to have 3/4 of the copies returned to the publisher and multiple criminal cases brought to court due to obscene content.


message 39: by Diane (new)

Diane Zwang | 1189 comments Mod
This challenge is now complete and closed. Thanks to all who participated.


back to top