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The Towers of Trebizond
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Group Reads > The Towers of Trebizond September Read Chapters 12-25

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Carol She's So Novel꧁꧂  | 1630 comments Mod
How are you finding this book so far?


Carol She's So Novel꧁꧂  | 1630 comments Mod
I found chapter 12 very funny.

Chapter 13 had one of the longest sentences I had ever seen.


Carol She's So Novel꧁꧂  | 1630 comments Mod
Ha I just realised I put chapter 12 on both threads. :)

I can't read quickly as there is a lot of detail & I'm scared I'll miss something!


message 4: by Karlyne (new)

Karlyne Landrum | 1945 comments Rats! Just finished Chapter 13, and I forgot to look out for The Longest Sentence!


Abigail Bok (regency_reader) | 673 comments Reminds me of eighth grade, when we had to diagram a sentence from The Ox-Bow Incident that went on for more than a page.


message 6: by Karlyne (new)

Karlyne Landrum | 1945 comments Abigail wrote: "Reminds me of eighth grade, when we had to diagram a sentence from The Ox-Bow Incident that went on for more than a page."

I loved diagramming! It was one of the very few things about school that I didn't detest.


Abigail Bok (regency_reader) | 673 comments Me too! Somehow it made thoughts make sense to me.


Carol She's So Novel꧁꧂  | 1630 comments Mod
Is diagramming like mind maps?

The further I get into this book, the funnier it gets! :D


message 9: by Abigail (last edited Sep 20, 2019 06:01PM) (new) - rated it 4 stars

Abigail Bok (regency_reader) | 673 comments It's a system of charting sentences visually based on part of speech.

Here's a basic site about it: http://grammar.ccc.commnet.edu/gramma...


Carol She's So Novel꧁꧂  | 1630 comments Mod
Abigail wrote: "It's a system of charting sentences visually based on part of speech.

Here's a basic site about it: http://grammar.ccc.commnet.edu/gramma..."


I love that! Don't recall having this in our lessons at all!


message 11: by Karlyne (new)

Karlyne Landrum | 1945 comments I think I loved it because it was so concrete and yet involved words that flew around!


message 12: by Karlyne (new)

Karlyne Landrum | 1945 comments I only had it in a very traditional school I went to while living in northern Idaho for a short time; when we moved to California I don't recall meeting it again!


message 13: by Karlyne (new)

Karlyne Landrum | 1945 comments I just read Chapter 14's paragraphs about how nobody talks about good and bad, anymore, and I was struck by how true it is. Unless people are talking about politics (and I avoid that like the plague) and only see it online), there is very little talk about whether something is good or bad to do or to think or be in contact with. It made me think of my two best friends and wonder if they are my best ones because we do talk about "hard" subjects, like right and wrong... Perhaps what used to be casual is now only for intimate discussion?


Abigail Bok (regency_reader) | 673 comments It seems we've swung too far to the opposite extreme when it comes to talking about ethical or moral questions. It was problematic when "society" felt it had the right to impose behavioral norms on individuals, but nowadays, it's rare to meet a young person who even has the vocabulary to think or speak about ethics. Time for mandatory interpersonal ethics classes in school?


message 15: by Karlyne (new)

Karlyne Landrum | 1945 comments I think you're right; the vocabulary of ethics or morals or even just good or bad, isn't a part of the common knowledge of today. It's obvious that the average youngster (you know, those under 35, maybe 40) can't defend any position they hold - that is, when they actually hold a position...

I laughed at Laurie's "becoming pretty hazy about right and wrong", and thinking that maybe blackmailing David would be fine. She's got at least a good idea of what a slippery slope practicing wrong is...


Lesley | 154 comments Abigail wrote: "It seems we've swung too far to the opposite extreme when it comes to talking about ethical or moral questions. It was problematic when "society" felt it had the right to impose behavioral norms on..."

I do agree, but I have a feeling our Educators probably wouldn't thank you for that idea. They say they are already carrying enough of the parent responsibilities with feeding, clothing and often have to toilet train the students. And parents are often voicing their dissent at having to do all of this because "they shouldn't be expected to do everything as they've busy lives too"! I sometimes wonder if parents are really just breeders now.


Lesley | 154 comments Back to the book - I have to keep reminding myself this is solely a work of fiction. It seems like I'm reading non-fiction, much like an amusing travelogue. Is it just me or do others feel it has an air of non-fiction about it?

Very enjoyable and entertaining though.


message 18: by Karlyne (new)

Karlyne Landrum | 1945 comments Lesley, I've been trying to figure out how what style this is since I began reading, and I've finally decided that it sounds like a diary that is being written for someone else to read. So it does sound like non-fiction!

In Chapter 16 we hear about how lovely the days with Vere were and how they spent the nights together, etc., and then she describes herself to the girls she met in Alexandretta as a "celibate missionary". She doesn't seem to be making fun of anyone or being deliberately misleading; is she telling them about the Anglican Church in order to assuage her weird conscience, I wonder? (If she were to convert any of them, she'd feel better?)


message 19: by Karlyne (new)

Karlyne Landrum | 1945 comments And more grammar: "Or to Cyprus, with Howard and I." Drives me crazy, too, Laurie, and it's everywhere. Social media has really brought it to the forefront, but those highly educated sportscasters/announcers might be the worst. It's so dagnabbed obvious that they went through college on scholarships which didn't have much to do with scholarship.


Abigail Bok (regency_reader) | 673 comments When understanding how to use "I" and "me," it sure helps to have studied Latin! I am very grateful for my old-fashioned education.

Around here, it's weather forecasters who come up with the most verbal excrescences.


message 21: by Rosina (new)

Rosina (rosinarowantree) Karlyne wrote: "And more grammar: "Or to Cyprus, with Howard and I." Drives me crazy, too, Laurie, and it's everywhere. Social media has really brought it to the forefront, but those highly educated sportscasters/..."

Yet hardly any of them would say 'to Cyprus, with I'. Which is something that will have to be dealt with if it is to become accepted as 'correct grammar' rather than colloquial speech.

It is everywhere over here too (assuming you are 'over there', as the mention of college suggests), even on the BBC, with what one might term 'educated' anchors, sometimes clearly reading scripted lines.


message 22: by Karlyne (new)

Karlyne Landrum | 1945 comments Or to have read a lot of good literature - or at least grammatically sound stories. I think so often "I" is used incorrectly because people think it sounds educated. I always want to shake them and say, "Would you really say, 'Come to the store with I?'" It's as though somewhere in the dim recesses of time they have a memory of being polite when talking about others, so of course we have to say, "Come to the store with George and I."

By the way, this book is making my brain swirl.


message 23: by Karlyne (new)

Karlyne Landrum | 1945 comments Rosina wrote: "Karlyne wrote: "And more grammar: "Or to Cyprus, with Howard and I." Drives me crazy, too, Laurie, and it's everywhere. Social media has really brought it to the forefront, but those highly educate..."

I read recently that it is correct now to say either "It is I" or "It is me", because of colloquial usage. And although it does sound weirdly snobby to say "It is I", I'm hoping that we don't lose grammar for the sake of the ungrammatical.


message 24: by Karlyne (new)

Karlyne Landrum | 1945 comments Ha! I'm wondering if Aunt Dot was the forerunner (or prototype or some such) of Mrs. Pollifax!


Abigail Bok (regency_reader) | 673 comments Or based on the Egyptian explorer woman from the nineteenth century who was the rough inspiration for Crocodile on the Sandbank and all its follow-ons, by Elizabeth Peters?

Am loving all the people writing their Turkey books.


message 26: by Karlyne (new)

Karlyne Landrum | 1945 comments I just finished, so now I'll be chewing on it for awhile.


Lesley | 154 comments Just finished. Wasn’t expecting that ending!

Overall an enjoyably amusing and entertaining read about the lives and travels of some slightly eccentric characters.


message 28: by Karlyne (new)

Karlyne Landrum | 1945 comments The ending was rather, uh, spectacular. She was certainly an interesting character, and I enjoyed all of the musings that ran in her mind like a pin ball machine. I found her allegiance to the Church something different than we're used to thinking (or at least that I'm used to thinking) about. And her understanding of her friends, especially Aunt Dot, and her affection for them in spite of understanding them so well, made her an engaging narrator.

A very interesting read!


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