World, Writing, Wealth discussion

16 views
World & Current Events > How do you choose your news?

Comments Showing 1-11 of 11 (11 new)    post a comment »
dateDown arrow    newest »

message 1: by Scout (new)

Scout (goodreadscomscout) | 5219 comments We all get our news from some source. What's your source, and why do you choose it?


message 2: by Ella (new)

Ella Craig | 38 comments For local news, I check out the Bulgarian sites that do English-language versions. For UK and world news, I start with the BBC (Well, I am British!).

Then I look at online British papers, usually The Telegraph, The Independent, and The Guardian.

My dad always said never just read papers that agree with your own views; cover the political spectrum because this will challenge you. It does and often leaves me frothing at the mouth.

When I’ve calmed down, I trawl the internet looking for the worldview on whatever articles intrigued/infuriated me. Al Jazeera is an excellent source for seeing news from a different perspective.

I like to finish with a visit to News Thump (a British news satire website), to lighten the mood and have a good laugh.


message 3: by Leonie (new)

Leonie (leonierogers) | 1579 comments I usually read/listen to/watch the ABC here in Australia. (Otherwise known as 'Aunty.') It doesn't tend to sensationalise things, and has a good track record for verification.

It also has a segment once a week called 'Media Watch' in which it points out flaws in various news articles across the board of Australian television. It does not exclude itself.


message 4: by Graeme (new)

Graeme Rodaughan | 7100 comments First off, the concept of an 'independent news organisation,' is an oxymoron.

All news is agenda driven.

However, if the news is the easily verifiable and non-controversial sports results - then it's going to be ok.

But anything more complicated than who won on the weekend will be put through filters to encapsulate messages that align with the primary agendas of the news organisation.

The key for me is understanding the organisational slant of the news organisation.

If you find an org that strikes you as 'really ,really good, honest, on target, etc...' they are simply reflecting back to you your own expectations, prejudices, and biases.

A corollary of all this is the way that the internet has facilitated 'echo chambers,' it is now completely possible to wrap oneself in sites that reflect back precisely what you already believe and never challenge your own mind ever again.

Personally, I view that as a disaster.


message 5: by Scout (new)

Scout (goodreadscomscout) | 5219 comments I agree, Graeme and Ella. I never watch FOX news because I don't need validation for my opinions, but I watch and listen to news from sources that don't agree with my personal views. Sometimes I learn something, but I always get some insight into the mindset of the opposition. I watch ABC and CBS morning programs. I was thinking today that both programs make a blatant and concerted effort to undermine the president and the conservative viewpoint. A news story is reported, and then come the commentary and the smirks and the head shaking. The only time this doesn't happen is when the story is in any way positive for conservatives. Then it's on to the next story with no reaction.


message 6: by Lizzie (new)

Lizzie | 1597 comments I watch ABC evening news and sometimes GMA. Specific topics my phone pulls up are usually CNN, The New York Times, Associated Press, and Arizona Central. When something catches my attention news-wise, I then go to the internet and search the topic.

I don't like watching video inserts or youtube. I want to read it myself. For me, it's much faster and the information then isn't being funneled through someone else's tone of voice and body language.


message 7: by Graeme (new)

Graeme Rodaughan | 7100 comments Scout wrote: "I never watch FOX news because I don't need validation for my opinions, but I watch and listen to news from sources that don't agree with my personal views. Sometimes I learn something, but I always get some insight into the mindset of the opposition...."

Hi Scout - welcome to the 10% of the population who are genuinely willing to confront their beliefs. You are not alone. Independence of thought is a gift, however it's also a ticket to a wall in front of a firing squad if totalitarians ever gain control.


message 8: by Graeme (new)

Graeme Rodaughan | 7100 comments Lizzie wrote: "I watch ABC evening news and sometimes GMA. Specific topics my phone pulls up are usually CNN, The New York Times, Associated Press, and Arizona Central. When something catches my attention news-wi..."

Great comment, Lizzie. How something is presented is very much part of the message.


message 9: by Graeme (new)

Graeme Rodaughan | 7100 comments I think the challenge for all of us, and this is something the Internet has not improved is gaining access to useful, actionable information.

I often feel swamped.


message 10: by Lizzie (new)

Lizzie | 1597 comments Graeme wrote: "I think the challenge for all of us, and this is something the Internet has not improved is gaining access to useful, actionable information.

I often feel swamped."


So very true. Many people never go past page 1 of their search. I used both Bing and Google, because they pull up different results and after perusing the 1st page, I will arbitrarily skip to another page of the search results - page 3, 5, 7, 19 - whatever. Search engines feed you back those sites that are paying them for higher rankings or those that more of the general public have clicked on. That is not necessarily your best information, just the most popular.

Before search engines, it was much harder, but doing those kinds of searches seemed to get better results (at least in my memory of it).


message 11: by W (new)

W I just read a couple of newspapers on the internet.There is too much bad news out there,I generally stay away from TV news.


back to top