Mystery/Thriller Reading Friends discussion

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Monthly "Reads" > Marcy's August

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message 1: by Marcy (new)

Marcy | 865 comments The Girl Who Played With Fire by Stieg Larsson - I thoroughly enjoyed reading this complex mystery which focuses mostly on the various people trying to solve many facets of the crime from different vantage points. As in the previous book, I was intrigued by quirky and brilliant Lisbeth Salander.

The Defector by Daniel Silva - I've always enjoyed this series about Gabriel Allon, talented artist turned Israeli spy, and while I liked this book as well, I'm wishing for something a little less predictable. Not that I want to see some main characters killed off, just an event or two to shake things up. Maybe the ending of this book is actually a prelude to that.

Alpha Female by April Christofferson - I enjoyed this new-to-me (thanks to Shomeret) author's thriller set in Yellowstone on many levels, but mainly for the beautiful setting and the mischief that wrecks havoc there. For me, the good guys also included the environment and the wilderness animals and consequently, the stakes were raised.

The Increment: A Novel by David Ignatius (audio) - This is a spy thriller about the American and British response to intelligence leaked by an Iranian informer to the CIA about the development of nuclear weapons by Iran. Though I enjoyed the plot, I found the story slow moving and the ending unsatisfying. I listened to, rather than read this book over an extended time and this might be the reason I was not totally caught up in it.

House Secrets: A Joe Demarco Thriller by Mike Lawson - The latest release in this series was another good read. I like Joe, the main character, and although he gets himself in some very tense situations, there is enough humor and minimum gore to keep me happy. After reading these books, I do find myself much more cynical about politicians - probably realistically so.

Ha’penny by Jo Walton - The 2nd in this alternative history series (after Farthing)was even better than the first. Ha'penny is a suspenseful thriller set in an England where Nazis are friends and some of the British, in addition to Jews and Communists, are hatching terrorist plots. Loyalties and motives are in flux. Carmichael, the Scotland Yard Inspector in charge of the case has his own problems and secrets. I thought this was very skillfully written, with the tension mounting up until the very end. I will definitely be looking to read the final book, Half A Crown.

The White Tiger by Aravind Adiga (audio) - Well written, darkly comic novel about a poor Indian chauffeur experiencing the vastly different lives of the many castes in India today. The resentment and poverty drive him to do certain things which he justifies by calling them "social entrepreneurship". I listened to the wonderfully lilting voice of John Lee on this audio and hated to have it end.

Rules of Vengeance by Christopher Reich - This book, which picks up after Rules of Deception leaves off, is a wonderfully complex thriller always leaving you wondering who the good guys truly are. Even now, I'm not sure I got all the plot twists, but it was a good ride.

The Lion’s Game by Nelson DeMille - I listened to this in preparation for the realease next year of the sequel, The Lion, by Nelson DeMille and found it very entertaining. This satiric thriller about New Yorker good-guy John Cory's pursuit of a Libyan terrorist was funny, exciting and attention grabbing. Ordinarily, I would be horribly offended by the sexist, stereotypical comments, but in the context of this book, I wasn't. Go figure. Looking forward to the next one.

Raising Jake by Charlie Carillo – Did not finish. I wanted to like this book, offered as a free kindle download, but I thought the sudden changes in tone very offsetting. I also didn't like the narrator, which can sometimes be a deal breaker for me. That said, I thought the writing was good and think others might enjoy the story.



message 2: by Ann (new)

Ann (annrumsey) | 14211 comments Marcy:
Good month! I was drooling today when I realized a co-worker had a copy of Stieg Larsson's The Girl Who Played with Fire -- I will get it at the library this weekend though!
I have seen some reviews of The White Tiger and it looks intriguing. I'll keep an eye out for an audio copy someday. Thanks for the tips!

Marcy wrote: "The Girl Who Played With Fire by Stieg Larsson - I thoroughly enjoyed reading this complex mystery ......The White Tiger by Aravind Adiga (audio) - Well written, darkly comic novel about a poor Indian chauffeur experiencing the vastly different lives of the many castes in India today. "



message 3: by Barry (new)

Barry (barrypz) | 2943 comments John Cory is one of DeMille's better creations, when he is not annoying everybody, including the reader.


message 4: by Susie (new)

Susie Fevella (susieinks) | 1598 comments Wow Marcy, you had a great month!


message 5: by Marcy (new)

Marcy | 865 comments Susie in KS wrote: "Wow Marcy, you had a great month!"

Yes, I truly did. I realize that I'm a better, more productive person when I've had a fair amount of daily reading time. At least, that's my story and I'm sticking to it .


message 6: by Ann (new)

Ann (annrumsey) | 14211 comments Marcy:
I like that perspective too! We are certainly more interesting conversationalists when we are reading something good on a daily basis! I was excited to find two people at work who just read The Girl Who Played with Fire! I also recommended Karin Slaughter!

Marcy wrote: "Susie in KS wrote: "Wow Marcy, you had a great month!"
Yes, I truly did. I realize that I'm a better, more productive person when I've had a fair amount of daily reading time. At least, that's my story and I'm sticking to it . ..."





message 7: by Marcy (new)

Marcy | 865 comments Ann wrote: "Marcy:
I like that perspective too! We are certainly more interesting conversationalists when we are reading something good on a daily basis! I was excited to find two people at work who just read..."


I think that readers have an easy entree into conversations. Once talk about the weather is exhausted, just move onto "I just read.." Works every time. Seriously, it does give you a broader perspective.



message 8: by Carol/Bonadie (new)

Carol/Bonadie (bonadie) | 7792 comments Marcy wrote: "
I think that readers have an easy entree into conversations. Once talk about the weather is exhausted, just move onto "I just read.." Works every time. Seriously, it does give you a broader perspective...."


It's so true, Marcy. I was greeting an applicant interviewing for a position and all it took for him to do was mention that mysteries were his favorite genre and we were off to the races. Probably unfair to the other candidates because it was an instant connection but what can I say? I have never been able to resist good M/T talk.



Mary/Quite Contrary Phillips | 459 comments In The Thirteenth Tale by Diane Setterfield, the main character works to get all daily tasks completed by 8pm, her reading time. After that, only reading. I have been working towards this goal daily and it helps focus me. If I don't get my full evening of reading, can be a bit crabby next day!


message 10: by Ann (new)

Ann (annrumsey) | 14211 comments Mary:
The Thirteenth Tale is one of my favorite books!
Mary/Quite Contrary wrote: "In The Thirteenth Tale by Diane Setterfield, the main character works to get all daily tasks completed by 8pm, her reading time. After that, only reading. I have been working towards this goal daily ..."



Mary/Quite Contrary Phillips | 459 comments Ann...I loved it too. And no messy crying jag like The Book Thief.


message 12: by Marcy (new)

Marcy | 865 comments Mary/Quite Contrary wrote: "In The Thirteenth Tale by Diane Setterfield, the main character works to get all daily tasks completed by 8pm, her reading time. After that, only reading. I have been working towards this goal da..."

Good plan. Sometimes, life does get in the way, but I also try to cut off from other distractions like the phone and to-do list things by about 8 or 9 pm. Now, if I could only stay awake longer life would be grand.


message 13: by Carol/Bonadie (new)

Carol/Bonadie (bonadie) | 7792 comments Mary/Quite Contrary wrote: "In The Thirteenth Tale by Diane Setterfield, the main character works to get all daily tasks completed by 8pm, her reading time. After that, only reading. I have been working towards this goal da..."

Good plan. Sometimes, life does get in the way, but I also try to cut off from other distractions like the phone and to-do list things by about 8 or 9 pm. Now, if I could only stay awake longer life would be grand. ..."


I like this idea. It would probably be much later for me, but I stay up late. The point is to institute some type of regular habit. Without it the time just flies and before it days have gone by since I picked up a book.





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