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All Passion Spent
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All Passion Spent > September 2019- All Passion Spent- Part 3

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Charlene Morris | 1112 comments Mod
Discussion for entire book and part 3.


Rebecca (becstokes) I enjoyed this book and am looking forward to watching the BBC production. I noticed that Lady Slane was concerned with her own dreams, ambitions etc while Genoux was too busy trying to work/survive to have the luxury of such reflections - very much a theme in modern feminism.
And that the idea of grandchildren seems more appealing than the reality!
I might read The Edwardians one day.


Marilyn | 185 comments How did you like the ending? I found it dissatisfying.

Lady Slane had 500 pounds a year and a servant to give her the independence to do whatever she wanted. (A Room of One's Own) When her great-granddaughter came to visit, she saw her younger self in this girl. The young Deborah had broken her engagement to a titled man she didn't love and expressed her desire to be a musician. I was expecting Lady Slane to bequeath her own 500 pounds a year to the girl so she wouldn't be at the financial mercy of her father. Instead, she died.


Charlene Morris | 1112 comments Mod
Marilyn wrote: "How did you like the ending? I found it dissatisfying.

Lady Slane had 500 pounds a year and a servant to give her the independence to do whatever she wanted. (A Room of One's Own) When her great-g..."


At least Lady Slane died knowing that not all her relatives have the ideals of her husband (like most of her children did).


Marilyn | 185 comments Charlene wrote: "Marilyn wrote: "How did you like the ending? I found it dissatisfying.

Lady Slane had 500 pounds a year and a servant to give her the independence to do whatever she wanted. (A Room of One's Own) ..."


Agreed, and it's probably a more realistic ending.


Charlene Morris | 1112 comments Mod
It seemed like Lady Slane didn't feel like she added anything to the world herself. Did Lady Slane ever draw during her married life. I don't remember reading if she did. I wonder if her children had seen her drawing or painting some if they would have been different. Carrie was such a horrible person to Mr. Bucktrout.

I know it isn't the same as being an artist for a living.


message 7: by Marilyn (last edited Sep 17, 2019 10:56AM) (new) - rated it 3 stars

Marilyn | 185 comments I also wonder if the children had seen her expressing her own interests they would have developed a different relationship with her.

Edith described her mother as "being merely a fluttering lovable presence amongst them" and "an appendage." I imagine the children were raised by a nanny to be proper ladies and gentlemen. They seem to mostly have seen their mother as a dutiful wife without a thought or desire of her own.


Marilyn | 185 comments The narrators changed throughout the book. I liked it because it gave the reader different perspectives. Take Carrie, for example. Carrie was in daily contact with her mother by phone or visiting the house because she thought her mother needed help in managing her day. Later we find out that one of the main reasons her mother wanted to move to Hampstead was to get away from Carrie's daily presence.


Charlene Morris | 1112 comments Mod
Marilyn wrote: "The narrators changed throughout the book. I liked it because it gave the reader different perspectives. Take Carrie, for example. Carrie was in daily contact with her mother by phone or visiting t..."

Carrie was definitely overbearing and acted like nothing could be done without her. I think she was my least favorite character.


message 10: by Ginny (last edited Sep 19, 2019 01:30PM) (new) - rated it 4 stars

Ginny (burmisgal) | 184 comments A fascinating little novel--felt quite allegorical to me. Apparently it was intended as a companion to A Room of One's Own, which I haven't read. How much of it is really happening? The memories seem real enough, but the fantastical events supposedly happening after Lord Slane's death are dream-like. The wreck of the house that is magically and effortlessly restored by two extremely unlikely men, who Carrie refers to as the "Greek chorus". The eccentric Fitz-George who gives her another chance to reject what she never rejected from her husband.

At the end, Lady Slane is confused by Deborah's visit:
Fortunate Deborah! she thought, to be so firm, so trustful, and by one person at least so well understood; but to which Deborah she alluded, she scarcely knew.
Is the great-granddaughter, and young women with her name, who we meet for the first time as old Deborah dies, really there?


message 11: by Suki (new) - rated it 4 stars

Suki St Charles (goodreadscomsuki_stcharles) | 60 comments I thought that Lady Slane's children were horrible (except for Edith). They all underestimated her, thought she was crazy, and made no attempt to actually get to know her as a person. They wanted to keep her in the role she had been cast into by her marriage, and they treated her (and Edith, who was most like her) with condescension, disdain, and even mild contempt. I enjoyed her glee at giving her inheritance from Mr FitzGeorge away instead of letting it go to her children, but I found it sadly ironic that she had the same blind spot toward Genoux as her family had toward her. She had never tried to learn about Genoux's past or to get to know her as a person, and in her mind Genoux was locked into her role as servant-- it never occurred to her that Genoux was also old and ailing, and could have been really helped by some of the money.


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