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All Passion Spent
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All Passion Spent > September 2019- All Passion Spent- Part 1

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Charlene Morris | 1127 comments Mod
Discussion for Part 1. Please realize if you haven't finished the section; there could be spoilers.


Charlene Morris | 1127 comments Mod
It is interesting that there is definite separation on the children. With 6 children, it would be easy to just ignore a couple but all six seem well defined. There is difference of situation. I like that there is an unmarried daughter; but dislike that the rest of the family sort of overlook her.


Ginny (burmisgal) | 190 comments Mr. Bucktrout, pirouetting around the room, pointing his toes, and philosophizing. I shared this quote, and got a bit of reaction. Is this sad? Is Mr. Bucktrout sad?
It is terrible to be twenty, Lady Slane. It is as bad as being faced with riding over the Grand National course. One knows one will almost certainly fall into the Brook of Competition, and break one’s leg over the Hedge of Disappointment, and stumble over the Wire of Intrigue, and quite certainly come to grief over the Obstacle of Love. When one is old, one can throw oneself down as a rider on the evening after the race, and think, Well, I shall never have to ride that course again.’
As I grow older, everyone is talking about their bucket lists. Things to do before they die. I often think, oh good. I will never have to do that thing again. Backpacking and camping, for example. I never did like it. Working for a living. I love retirement, and am so grateful on the first day of school, I can sit around with my coffee and read books. An anti-bucket list. I have a feeling that's where this book is headed.


Kathleen | 194 comments Ginny, I saw the comment, and I'm afraid the comment I made in response didn't make any sense because I was mis-remembering the quote. I thought it came from a young speaker, but it sounds like it was after that encounter. Argh--sorry. Too long since I've read this!

But to your point, I agree completely. Funny how what may have brought feelings of dread in our youth now brings feelings of relief. :-)


Ginny (burmisgal) | 190 comments Kathleen wrote: "Ginny, I saw the comment, and I'm afraid the comment I made in response didn't make any sense because I was mis-remembering the quote. I thought it came from a young speaker, but it sounds like it ..."

Bucktrout is nothing if not eccentric. Lady Slane points out that, when one was young, one desired danger. And then Bucktrout launches in to a description of his very energetic life. He is always making enthusiastic statements and then reversing his opinion.


message 6: by Ginny (last edited Sep 07, 2019 02:00PM) (new) - rated it 4 stars

Ginny (burmisgal) | 190 comments This novel is such a wonderful blending of the intimately personal and the deeply thoughtful political. Feminist to its core! A 38 year old woman writing a very old woman. I am reminded of The Stone Angel. A very different book because of the landscape, (rural Canada vs. London), but many similarities. Speaking of all the games her husband and his cronies play:
The whole tragic system seemed to be based upon an extraordinary convention, as incomprehensible as the theory of money, which (so she had been told) bore no relation to the actual supply of gold. It was chance which had made men turn gold into their symbol, rather than stones; it was chance which had made men turn strife into their principle, rather than amity. That the planet might have got on better with stones and amity – a simple solution – had apparently never occurred to its inhabitants.
And by "men" here, she means men. Not people in general.


Marilyn | 190 comments Charlene wrote: "It is interesting that there is definite separation on the children. With 6 children, it would be easy to just ignore a couple but all six seem well defined. There is difference of situation. I lik..."

I am hoping that they are underestimating Edith. I love that as Lady Slane exerts her independence, Edith (silently) cheers for her.


message 8: by Marilyn (last edited Sep 10, 2019 01:18PM) (new) - rated it 3 stars

Marilyn | 190 comments Ginny wrote: "Mr. Bucktrout, pirouetting around the room, pointing his toes, and philosophizing. I shared this quote, and got a bit of reaction. Is this sad? Is Mr. Bucktrout sad? It is terrible to be twenty, La..."

When I read the quote I think it's more about wisdom and experience than sadness. His life is no longer about the rat race.

Bucket lists do change over time. When I was much younger and traveling, I got the rail pass, strapped on the backpack and went exploring. Now that I am older I still want to explore, but let me get on the tour bus, have the guide explain what's next, and drop me off near the entrance.


Suki St Charles (goodreadscomsuki_stcharles) | 60 comments Marilyn wrote: "Charlene wrote: "It is interesting that there is definite separation on the children. With 6 children, it would be easy to just ignore a couple but all six seem well defined. There is difference of..."

I like Edith. I identified with her. Her brothers and sister were very much like members of my family who are very proper, upstanding citizens who thoroughly disapprove of me and my life choices (I didn't marry a rich man, never had children or a showhome), but I'm still happy and that really seems to bother some of them. :-)


message 10: by Suki (new) - rated it 4 stars

Suki St Charles (goodreadscomsuki_stcharles) | 60 comments Ginny wrote: "Mr. Bucktrout, pirouetting around the room, pointing his toes, and philosophizing. I shared this quote, and got a bit of reaction. Is this sad? Is Mr. Bucktrout sad? It is terrible to be twenty, La..."

Ginny, I love your anti-bucket list comment. I was so happy to finally reach an age where people no longer ask me when I'm going to get married and have kids, or try to fix me up with some guy they know who will be "perfect for you", (and never is). I also love that I no longer care about things that really mattered when I was younger.


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