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Glass (Crank, #2)
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Author's Pick > Glass (Crank, #2) (September 2019)

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Mariah Roze (mariahroze) | 1392 comments Mod
Glass (Crank, #2) by Ellen Hopkins


Mariah Roze (mariahroze) | 1392 comments Mod
I can't wait till this book comes in :)


Mariah Roze (mariahroze) | 1392 comments Mod
Anyone reading this? I'd love to discuss this book!


aPriL does feral sometimes  (cheshirescratch) | 436 comments Kristina really really is not easy to sympathize with at all in this one. But the author is definitely giving us the inside picture! For example, Kristina obviously can only focus on getting glass. Her baby is only an annoying interruption, ffs. Awful.


Mariah Roze (mariahroze) | 1392 comments Mod
aPriL does feral sometimes wrote: "Kristina really really is not easy to sympathize with at all in this one. But the author is definitely giving us the inside picture! For example, Kristina obviously can only focus on getting glass...."

I know! It really shows how addiction takes over your life and you can't care about anyone or anything else... so sad!


aPriL does feral sometimes  (cheshirescratch) | 436 comments Government should be concentrating on helping addicted people, including involuntary commitments, in my opinion. You can see through these books (plus personal observation) addiction is very difficult to 'fix' by willpower or voluntary means.

: (


Mariah Roze (mariahroze) | 1392 comments Mod
aPriL does feral sometimes wrote: "Government should be concentrating on helping addicted people, including involuntary commitments, in my opinion. You can see through these books (plus personal observation) addiction is very diffic..."

Yes! I completely agree and I think there should be way more to prevent people from getting into drugs and addictive activity.


aPriL does feral sometimes  (cheshirescratch) | 436 comments Another way to 'solve' the problem of addiction is this:

https://crosscut.com/2019/09/after-15...

Experimentally, a local group in my area tried to make an apartment building available with no judgement for chronic alcoholics. They could drink as much as they wanted and had medical assistance provided without cost. The reason this was tried because, Big Picture, drunks collapsed everywhere in downtown Seattle and required ambulance delivery to hospital emergency rooms, and sometimes a stay in a hospital ICU unit. It was/is common, everyday, and very very expensive for everyone except the chronic alcoholics. This works, insofar as getting alcoholics/drug addicts off of the streets and lowering costs. They remain addicts, though, even if it looks like they reduce consumption and costs to the public and other institutions.

In my experience with family members and some high school friends who grew up into chronic alcoholics and drug users, most - MOST - refuse any treatment whatsoever. However, living on the streets was/is not only a personal tragedy for them and their families, it has an enormous public cost too.

I had a college friend who worked as a security guard at a hospital. He had daily - DAILY - multiple incidents of drug addicted users attacking hospital and ambulance staff who were trying to help them (1985). One day, a meth user was so violent, psychotic and out of control, it took six men (no woman could have possibly handled him) to get him under control. They eventually saved his life of course - after rescuers sustained broken bones, time off of work, massive personal co-pays/deductibles and doctor bills. My friend quit and became a security guard at a warehouse. He was in college working towards a computer science degree and liberal, but drug-addicted people are dangerous when high.

My brother had a close friend in high school who became an alcoholic and I don't know what else. Twenty years after high school, (1993) this guy, forty years old, showed up at my brother's house. He smelled bad, had rotting teeth, was unkempt. His clothes were filthy. He wanted money. My brother had a young toddler, his daughter, at home. Talk about fear.

When my brother sold his house a few years ago, squatters broke in and set up house during the time it took to sell the house. There are almost no laws to handle this situation. For many homeowners, it takes years to evict drug abusers from squats (uninhabited houses). Meanwhile, the druggies wreck the house, scare the neighbors, cause multiple calls to the police every week because of drug partying, cars driving up all day and night, increased break-ins and stealing of yard tools, public urination and defecation, naked men and women out of their minds, etc.

My husband managed a RadioShack store downtown Seattle (1980's). Every day he had to hose down the front and back alley entrances of the store because of human waste, poop in other words. Sometimes there was a horrendous smelling individual asleep in front of the doors. He had to call 911, of course - ambulance, hospital emergency room, extended stay - all without health insurance - at least once a week, before 8:00 am opening time.

A fellow who attended my college, and dropped out, I met again (1990's) sitting in front of a downtown convenience store. He was sitting on the sidewalk with a woman and three toddlers, with a soup can in front of them. He stank, they stank, and had no teeth. Shock and horror is only a part of what I felt.

I rode the bus every day to and fro from my job downtown. One day, a man came aboard who smelled as if he had rolled in a pile of poop and rotting meat. When he got up I saw he had poop all over the back of his loose pants. He sat behind the bus driver. I was sitting in the back, but I could smell him all the way back to my area. The bus route passed a church that gave away free meals every day at lunchtime, and this was his reason for riding on this route. He walked off without paying anything, I wondered who would next sit where he had.

Also, the news every night with a story of impaired drivers killing more and more people from driving the wrong way on freeways, or speeding through intersections, or crossing the center line of roads, or taking down the electricity of entire neighborhoods from hitting power poles, or driving into mom-and-pop stores.

This stuff is EVERYDAY, but we do nothing but argue about morality - the addicted's, the public's, the family.

: @


message 9: by aPriL does feral sometimes (last edited Sep 29, 2019 03:51PM) (new) - rated it 4 stars

aPriL does feral sometimes  (cheshirescratch) | 436 comments Interesting YouTube videos about opiod addiction:

https://youtu.be/DbeVhMye9NQ

https://youtu.be/N5e8juvBrp4


aPriL does feral sometimes  (cheshirescratch) | 436 comments What meth does to the body:

https://youtu.be/mo4xBX9H3ls

I have seen these issue in addicted people...

What unaddicted folks REALLY need to understand is how empathy and sympathy totally die off in addicted people. You cannot often reach them by playing on their sympathies for their children or parents.


message 14: by Kay Dee (new)

Kay Dee (kdf_333) | 62 comments i work with addicts on the daily and have family members who were addicts. there are soooooooo many different reasons a person becomes an addict that various methods are needed to help. what works for one addict may not work for another.

for my aunt it took almost losing custody of her child. my dad it took living on the street for about a year. my cousin when he had his 3rd kid he got sober.

in my workplace i see cusomters who are clean for a few years or months or days and then they relapse. Also with my customers who are addicts a lot of them also have serious mental illnesses that are not being treated on a regular basis.

sooo it's a big problem and one solution will not fix it. but having multiple solutions available would be helpful. putting them in jail when they break a law is not helpful at all. forced rehab would be better. it might not work on all of the addicts but it would work on some. that would cut down on the repeat offenses for dui's, trespass, public disturbances, assaults, etc. instead of the revolving door a lot of addicts have now with jails. also would be helpful if the government had not shut down the state mental hospitals cuz now there is nowhere to send them except jail or back onto the streets.

just like poverty will always be an issue so will addiction. but there are ways to cut down on it.


message 15: by aPriL does feral sometimes (last edited Oct 01, 2019 02:47PM) (new) - rated it 4 stars

aPriL does feral sometimes  (cheshirescratch) | 436 comments One of the two remaining state hospitals in my state (there used to be four) lost its Federal certification and $53 million in funding in 2018;

https://www.opb.org/news/article/wash...

https://mynorthwest.com/1495690/weste...

https://www.seattletimes.com/seattle-...

https://www.thenewstribune.com/news/l...

https://www.kiro7.com/news/local/viol...

Plus, in the 1970's, we had tons of neighborhood walk-in pay-as-you-can-afford psychiatric clinics with on-site psychologists and therapists. All of them were closed by President Ronald Reagan.

The city of Seattle had hundreds of rundown hotels all over the city, but many I personally saw were on Seattle's 1st Avenue, near the Pioneer Square and Pike Street Market areas (also with a few surviving pole dance clubs and seamen's taverns). Originally built for visiting fishermen, tree loggers and sailors, they had become the homes of alcoholics, prostitutes and addicts. These people now only have the streets, abandoned buildings and broken RVs to live in. When the city approved the hotels to be torn down, they replaced them with expensive condos and office skyscrapers.


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