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ReEvolution: a crispr novel
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MISCELLANEOUS TOPICS > Genetic Engineering CRISPR Technology: is Humanity Ready to Control Evolution

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message 1: by Alex (new) - added it

Alex Grant (goodreadsgranta1) | 8 comments Hi, everyone.

I wrote a book on CRISPR, the genetic engineering technology. It is a hard science fiction thriller with real science and a compelling story. It deals with corporate corruption, global elites, crooked banks and international actors (including those who are currently performing serious research in the area) who want to use the incredible power of CRISPR for their own ends.

I advise everyone to google or otherwise research CRISPR because it is a game changer for the human race. It so fascinated me that I researched CRISPR and then published a novel about it on Amazon. It's called "ReEvolution, a crispr novel."

CRISPR can delete or add genes by cutting and replacing them. It can also turn genes on and off in a highly targeted way, can be used in all plants and animals, has already been used to change DNA to strengthen plants, cure genetic diseases in mammals (including humans) and was used to increase muscle mass in dogs. It has the potential to alter a human's appearance, athletic ability and intelligence. The woman who invented CRISPR wrote a book called "A Crack in Creation," a worthwhile read. Keep your eye on the bouncing ball, because it is not overhyped - it is real and a little scary. It is also easy and inexpensive to do.

Numerous labs are doing research in this area around the globe. There is a potential for pandemics if scientists change the genome of bacteria or viruses. CRISPR can also be used for military applications or to enhance people's traits, which has a serious potential for abuse. It also begs the question of who will benefit from this technology.

Artificial intelligence likely will make CRISPR more targeted and potent.

It is also a timely topic. A Chinese scientist recently applied the science to embryo twins and they were born HIV resistant. He published his findings on YouTube. The U.S. Congress recently passed a law making it illegal for people to use CRISPR technology on themselves. For a short time, there were a number of media reports about CRISPR, but coverage seems to have dropped off.

I wrote the book so people can get an idea of the potential of CRISPR, and its possible abuses, in an entertaining and easy to read format.

If you are interested, I also set up a web page: alexgrantbooks.com.

I look forward to reading any comments.


message 2: by James, Group Founder (new)

James Morcan | 11213 comments A Crispr Milestone Hints at a Future of Cures — and Oversight Concerns https://undark.org/2019/11/22/abstrac...

JUST SEVEN YEARS after scientists announced the first use of Crispr-Cas9 gene editing technology on human cells, researchers shared new evidence this week that Crispr can be used to cure two serious genetic disorders.

On Tuesday, NPR reported that a patient in Nashville had seen a dramatic decline in her symptoms of sickle cell disease after receiving a single gene therapy treatment in July. Sickle cell, which can lead to inflammation, debilitating pain, and life-threatening circulatory problems, affects millions of people around the world.


message 3: by Alex (new) - added it

Alex Grant (goodreadsgranta1) | 8 comments It is great to see the fruits of CRISPR technology, and there are probably plenty more where that came from. The technology can also be used to map out genes and determine their function, aiding in further medical treatments.

CRISPR has a multitude of potential uses. It can change your DNA by cutting out disease causing genes (or adding non-disease creating genes), can change your genes so they express themselves differently (ie. make you taller, stronger, or smarter), and can be used to turn on and off genes.

The use of the technology to cure Sickle cell is not actually the scariest use of CRISPR. It is not a germline change in the entire body (which CRISPR can do), but is a change in the DNA that changes the Heme molecule and is done outside the body. It changes only blood cells' DNA. In the case of the recent apparent cure, scientists used CRISPR to edit a gene in bone marrow cells that had been removed from the patient's body. The edited cells were infused back into her system, and the editing change allowed the cells to start producing fetal hemoglobin again.

CRISPR has the potential to change all the cells in your body and should be able to take out genes that cause heart disease, cancer (like taking out the Brca gene) or other maladies before they strike, or can be taken out at inception. Unfortunately, at this time there are too many potential unintended consequences so it is not feasible yet. In my book, I explore powerful computers and AI can potentially alleviate this problem.

This technology has an incredible potential for good and curing all types of maladies, but it is also cheap and easy to do (you can buy kits on the internet). In this world, where there are bad state actors that likely will not regulate the technology, it is not hard to see how it can go horribly wrong.

I did a seminar with a group affiliated with Stanford U. where CRISPR was invented, and when I asked the panelists if they thought, in a world with countries like North Korea, Russia and China, that CRISPR could be regulated, they essential said no. These countries probably convince themselves it is societal negligence not to use the technology to strengthen their societies and/or alleviate suffering - particularly if it is their progeny who will get the benefits.

Anyway, China is on it way to being a leader in this technology and did the first CRISPR enhanced embryos that were born with changes to the genes which made them HIV resistant. The Chinese government distanced itself from his work, but the scientist successfully had the twins come to term and were apparently born healthy. Who knows what's next in countries which are not as ethically constrained as the USA?


message 4: by James, Group Founder (new)

James Morcan | 11213 comments Alex wrote: "I did a seminar with a group affiliated with Stanford U. where CRISPR was invented, and when I asked the panelists if they thought, in a world with countries like North Korea, Russia and China, that CRISPR could be regulated, they essential said no. These countries probably convince themselves it is societal negligence not to use the technology to strengthen their societies and/or alleviate suffering - particularly if it is their progeny who will get the benefits...."

Any video links you can share of your talks, Alex?


message 5: by Alex (new) - added it

Alex Grant (goodreadsgranta1) | 8 comments Sorry, I don't have one. I attended the seminar remotely and submitted a few questions which were answered by the panel, one of which was the one I cited. Have a good holiday.


message 6: by Damien (new)

Damien Concordel (damienc_author) We're already controlling evolution, believe it or not: We've artificially selected our livestock, our vegetables, our grain, even our pets, to suit our interests. Case in point: the avocado. It really has no reason to keep existing, no evolutionary advantage at all, yet we still have it just because we're still growing it for our food.

AND it's not over: for millions of years our own evolution was more actual natural selection, because we were making our decisions purely on the basis of survival instinct. But now that we're capable of reasoning with criteria other than pure survival, now that our work isn't directly involved in survival, now that leisure takes up so much of our time, we're artificially selecting ourselves in other ways that aren't necessarily as likely to give us or maintain an evolutionary advantage.

The most basic example of this is our attitudes toward sex: sex is, of course, what keeps the species going, through its natural consequence of creating more humans. And of course, if you don't have any sex, it's extremely unlikely any of your own progeny will later on. We're now in a position where we can make our own decisions based on preference and tastes rather than instinct, and this means we can choose to have sex or not with no regard for evolution. Of course, this means that now we're getting more sex-positive, simply because those of us who were back then were the more sex-positive. And this trend will only grow.

And conversely, our own artificial self-selection is shooting us in the foot too: we've established entire healthcare systems and societies on the idea that we need to protect human life at all cost, whatever conditions are afflicting it. This means we're keeping people alive that, in the normal scheme of natural selection, were never meant to survive, and therefore perpetuating their conditions in the rest of our species. DISCLAIMER: I'm sure as hell NOT promoting any kind of eugenics here, I'm just pointing out that this approach means that such conditions will stay with us that much longer and we'll have to keep fighting them, which then raises the question of the cost to future generations.

Anyway, just food for thought.


message 7: by James, Group Founder (new)

James Morcan | 11213 comments Gene-Editing. New Genetic Engineering Techniques, Yes or No? “Who’s Thinking Outside the Box?” https://www.globalresearch.ca/award-w...


message 8: by James, Group Founder (new)

James Morcan | 11213 comments Gene Editing and “Genetically Modified Humans”: China’s “Golem Babies”. There Is Another Agenda https://www.globalresearch.ca/chinas-...


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