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In Cold Blood
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Archived > September 2019 Book Discussion PART I: Sept 1-7

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message 1: by tabascosauce (last edited Sep 09, 2019 09:02PM) (new) - rated it 4 stars

tabascosauce (twicebakedsmallpotatoes) | 60 comments Mod
It's September! Hopefully for some of you that's exciting πŸ˜’πŸ˜›

One thing I am excited about is this month's BOTM! Thanks to those of you who participated in the voting, Truman Capote's In Cold Blood is what we'll be reading for September's theme, "Trendsetter". It is regarded by critics as a pioneering work in the true crime genre (though it is not the first), and some parts, including important details, differ from what actually took place.

(Edit: in case some of you are confused - and just to clear the air - this is not the first "true crime" novel ever published. It's the first American novel, and one known for inspiring others to write their own true crime stories around the world. Because of that, we've decided it's a valid nomination.)

I have made a reading tracker for those of you not sure about how much to read. To download, upload, and/or print it, click here! Hopefully the link works. Just tell me if it doesn't.

For those of you who don't want to bother, just letting you know you want to shoot for around 10 pages a day. In this section, we're discussing PART ONE: THE LAST TO SEE THEM ALIVE. Please do not post anything about any of the parts following!

Since this is only part one of a four-part book and discussion, please keep all spoilers (or possible spoilers, since we don't all know beforehand) TO YOURSELF! Until the rest of the group has caught up and is reading the part of the book where the spoiler takes place, we ask that you hold it in - you don't have to mark it spoiler if you're commenting on the right thread, but if you happen to spill the beans and someone notices, your comment will get deleted by one of the mods (probably me!). You won't get thrown out, but you may get a message by one of the mods (probably me!), telling you what's what and giving you a piece of our minds. Just kidding, but really please do take it seriously, since you hold the power to single-handedly ruin the entire book for multiple people in your hands. And we don't want someone to write a murder book about you one day!

A little background that you're already familiar with if you read the broadcast message...

In Cold Blood is a non-fiction novel by American author Truman Capote, detailing the murders of four members of the Herbert Clutter family that took place in 1959, in the small farming community of Holcomb, Kansas.
"The book is neither a who-done-it nor a will-they-be-caught, since the answers to both questions are known from the outset... instead, the book's suspense is based largely on a totally new idea in detective stories: the promise of gory details, and the withholding of them until the end." ~ Tom Wolfe
If you're like me and don't feel comfortable buying things until you know they're good, you can download it for free. Check-mark the Captcha box, click download, and you should be all set!

Having never read it myself, I'm exciting to see what you guys think of this book!

Let the discussing begin in 3, 2, 1...


KitKat The #BookNerd KBbookreviews (kb98) | 12 comments I love In Cold Blood as I studied it for my A-Levels! The discussions on Capote's authorial bias and the text itself are some of the best I have had and look forward to discussing them more with everyone here!


Daniel | 165 comments Mod
This book has been in my possession multiple times, but unfortunately, some life event had always forced me to return it to the library unread. Obviously, the universe wanted me to hold out and for good reason. I am beyond excited for these group discussions.


tabascosauce (twicebakedsmallpotatoes) | 60 comments Mod
K wrote: "I love In Cold Blood as I studied it for my A-Levels! The discussions on Capote's authorial bias and the text itself are some of the best I have had and look forward to discussing them more with ev..."

ooh hope we live up to your expectations! 😜 Can't wait to hear what you have to say, since you're so familiar with it!

Daniel wrote: "This book has been in my possession multiple times, but unfortunately, some life event had always forced me to return it to the library unread. Obviously, the universe wanted me to hold out and for..."

Me too!! I'm so glad people are excited, and hopefully between the ones who love it and the ones reading it first time, we'll have some insightful observations! Excited to hear what your first impressions are πŸ˜„


KitKat The #BookNerd KBbookreviews (kb98) | 12 comments twice_baked✌️ wrote: "K wrote: "I love In Cold Blood as I studied it for my A-Levels! The discussions on Capote's authorial bias and the text itself are some of the best I have had and look forward to discussing them mo..."

I'm sure you will! :D I cant wait to see what opinions everyone else has too.


message 6: by Kathy (new)

Kathy Hale (kahale) | 17 comments This is one of my favorite books. Harper Lee of To Kill a Mockingbird worked with Capote on this book. I agree with the bias because Capote became engrossed with the suspects of this crime.


KitKat The #BookNerd KBbookreviews (kb98) | 12 comments Kathy wrote: "This is one of my favorite books. Harper Lee of To Kill a Mockingbird worked with Capote on this book. I agree with the bias because Capote became engrossed with the suspects of this crime."

I am so glad you agree- his bias is so clear in some parts of the book that i'm not surprised he was criticized at all - Harper Lee was so important to the production-its surprising how its hardly ever noted!


Daniel | 165 comments Mod
Are the discussions going to be separated into four parts to avoid spoilers?

For this post, I will keep my opinions general.

Truman Capote's prose is direct and sharply refined. I could read about small towns all day and never get bored. The simple nuisances that govern the life in these tiny pockets of civilization produce some the most eclectic characters. The sense of impending doom juxtaposed against the wholesomeness of this quaint farming community makes for an engaging read.

For a community putting the worst of the Dust Bowl behind them, Herbert Clutter's agricultural feats are extremely plausible.
After watching the Ken Burns documentary about that bleak time period, Clutter's optimism and leadership abilities are a true force and shouts across the pages. Also, it was interesting hearing about his opposition of his daughter attending a high school out of their own district which foreshadows the advent of charter schools on a mass level, especially here in Florida.

Herbert's wife, Bonnie, and her issues with postnatal depression is sad, as well as interesting to read about, considering the time period. I am not surprised that the Clutter's would opt to handle these problems internally, but it speaks volumes about Herbert's empathetic nature that he seeks help for his wife, even from alternative sources. Then again - I could be very well roped in because at this point of the story, I do not know who is who when the bomb drops.


message 9: by Jazzy (last edited Sep 09, 2019 01:19AM) (new)

Jazzy Lemon (jazzylemon) | 218 comments Kathy wrote: "This is one of my favorite books. Harper Lee of To Kill a Mockingbird worked with Capote on this book. I agree with the bias because Capote became engrossed with the suspects of this crime."

Harper Lee and Truman Capote were life-long friends since childhood. I'm sure you already know the character Dill in To Kill a Mockingbird is based on Truman Capote.


Daniel | 165 comments Mod
I love these connections.


message 11: by tabascosauce (last edited Sep 09, 2019 08:24PM) (new) - rated it 4 stars

tabascosauce (twicebakedsmallpotatoes) | 60 comments Mod
Daniel wrote: "Are the discussions going to be separated into four parts to avoid spoilers?

For this post, I will keep my opinions general.

Truman Capote's prose is direct and sharply refined. I could read abou..."


Would you guys like it separated? That totally works with me, just want to make sure no one's overwhelmed with the multiple threads.

(edit: that docu sounds like it would really benefit some aspects of the book! Could you post the link here, at least for me?)


Daniel | 165 comments Mod
This is a link to the trailer for the Ken Burns Dust Bowl documentary:

https://youtu.be/MYOmjQO_UMw


tabascosauce (twicebakedsmallpotatoes) | 60 comments Mod
Daniel wrote: "This is a link to the trailer for the Ken Burns Dust Bowl documentary:

https://youtu.be/MYOmjQO_UMw"


πŸ™ŒπŸ™Œ thank you so much!


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