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RMFAO 2019 Genre Challenge > September'19 - Humour or World Fiction

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message 1: by Heena (new)

Heena Rathore Pardeshi (heenarathore) | 2134 comments Mod
September is here and again we have the choice of 2 genres - Humour or World Fiction. As always, you can choose to do either or both of the genres, whatever suits you. You can join anytime during the entire month and read as many (or as less) books as you can manage, no restrictions whatsoever!

If you are a humour or world fiction reader then we request you to please recommend some awesome books to other members. Others, please feel free to ask for suggestions and recs. Reviews of books are greatly appreciated and we are okay with anyone posting relevant links too.

There are absolutely no limits so you can interpret this genre in its broader sense and include other similar genres and/or subgenres that you feel might have a wee bit of similarity with the main genre. You can also include books that are not particularly centered around the main genre but has its components or elements somewhere in the story.

The main intent of this challenge is to incorporate different kinds of books and genres in our normal reading routine to make the experience more fun and entertaining. Please do not lose yourself in the technicalities as we all know how literary genres can be confusing.
If you have any doubts or questions, then post them below and we'll be happy to answer/discuss them.

Here are the DEFINITIONs for this month's genres:

Humour Humour (spelt Humor in US English), is also known as comedy fiction. A comic/humor novel is usually a work of fiction in which the writer seeks to amuse the reader, sometimes with subtlety and as part of a carefully woven narrative, sometimes above all other considerations. It could be said that comedy fiction is literary work that aims primarily to provoke laughter, but this isn't always as obvious as it first may seem.

World Fiction - Fiction from around the world. For this challenge, it means reading works of authors from other countries than the one you are from. (I'll post the technical definition in a day or two.)

Here's a quick summary of the levels:

Level 1: Casual Reader: 1 book (easy)
Level 2: Frequent Reader: 2 books (moderate)
Level 3: Bookworm: 3 books (mildly strenuous)
Level 4: Bibliophile: 4 books (strenuous)
Level 5: Bookiopath: 5 books or more (challenging)

Please mention what type of books you'd be reading:

PB: Paperbacks
HB: Hardbacks
EB: E-Books
AB: Audio Books

Please feel free to announce your to-read books along with the level you are targeting for below. Though it is not necessary as you can announce your reads as and when you decide or read them.

PLEASE READ (especially new members):
1. You can read any number of books for the respective genre every month.
2. You can join the challenge at any stage (in any month.)
3. You can drop out of the challenge any time you like.
4. You can select different levels every month.
5. Use this discussion board to share your reads with other members of the group.
6. Please be active and don't hesitate to ask questions or recommend books.
7. You can couple this challenge with any other challenge here (or anywhere else.) We all do it and it makes it all the more fun!

Happy reading!


message 2: by Cheryl (last edited Aug 31, 2019 01:47PM) (new)

Cheryl | 1892 comments Mod
Heena,

For World Fiction, is it ok to pick a book by an author who was born in a different country from your own but who was a refugee from that country? As an example, Vaddey Ratner was born in Cambodia but became a refugee during the Khmer Rouge regime and she nows lives in the U.S. (my own country)?


〰️Beth〰️ (x1f4a0bethx1f4a0) | 135 comments 📚This was a goal for me this year. 📚 I have read some great world fiction this year including books from Japan, Indonesia, South Africa, Denmark, Russia, Zambia, Turkey, Egypt, Brazil, Nigeria, Colombia, Israel, Vietnam, Italy and China.

Not sure what this month will bring, but there are some amazing works that are finally being printed in English.


message 4: by T (new)

T (satya_t) can you please suggest me few books for the world fiction genre....This is my first hearing about this genre and so I've no idea as to where to start or what to pick


message 5: by Cheryl (last edited Aug 31, 2019 06:40PM) (new)

Cheryl | 1892 comments Mod
T wrote: "can you please suggest me few books for the world fiction genre....This is my first hearing about this genre and so I've no idea as to where to start or what to pick"

This might be a good place to start:

https://www.goodreads.com/shelf/show/...

Also, check out the books in this Listopia list:
https://www.goodreads.com/list/show/5...

Only authors in the country you live in are excluded. (Example: I live in the U.S., so authors from the U.S. are excluded for me.)

Don't forget about classic authors like Tolstoy, Balzac, James Joyce, Jules Verne, Jane Austen, etc. Any that are from a country other than your own will qualify for this challenge.


message 6: by Heena (new)

Heena Rathore Pardeshi (heenarathore) | 2134 comments Mod
Cheryl - Yes, you can read the works of author born in another country but living in yours, so long as their works have an influence or are insightful about and related to their own country. The purpose is to be able to explore cultures and seemingly mundane but in reality new-to-reader details about other countries :)


message 7: by Cheryl (new)

Cheryl | 1892 comments Mod
Thanks, Heena! That clears things up.


message 8: by Dagny (new)

Dagny (madamevauquer) | 3160 comments Mod
Thanks for the links to the lists, Cheryl. I looked at the first few pages of each one and spotted several books including Isak Dinesen's Out of Africa which I've been meaning to read for years.


message 9: by Dagny (new)

Dagny (madamevauquer) | 3160 comments Mod
I'm still trying to get organized, but I spotted The Wheels of Chance: A Bicycling Idyll a while back and saved it for the Humor portion of this month's challenge. It's free in both eText from Project Gutenberg and audio from LibriVox. It will also count for the Classics Catchup Challenge.
http://www.gutenberg.org/ebooks/1264
https://librivox.org/the-wheels-of-ch...


message 10: by T (new)

T (satya_t) Cheryl wrote: "T wrote: "can you please suggest me few books for the world fiction genre....This is my first hearing about this genre and so I've no idea as to where to start or what to pick"

This might be a goo..."

Thanks a lot for the list! I was wondering if books like The Diary of a Young Girl or I Am Malala: The Story of the Girl Who Stood Up for Education and Was Shot by the Taliban fall under this category because although they are not fiction they do have this refugee theme going on in them. Do you think they fall under this category?


message 11: by Fran (new)

Fran | 462 comments Thanks so much for the list it was great. Can we mix genres (and read a bit of both options) to complete the challenge?


message 12: by Cheryl (last edited Sep 02, 2019 10:55AM) (new)

Cheryl | 1892 comments Mod
T,
Those books you mentioned are non-fiction, so I don’t think they would work for this particular challenge. Another place to look at books for World Fiction is mystery novels. There are many written by Irish, Scottish, English, and Scandinavian authors.

Fran,

Yes, you can mix books from both options to complete the challenge.


message 13: by Cheryl (last edited Sep 02, 2019 10:56AM) (new)

Cheryl | 1892 comments Mod
Another place I go to for book recommendations for challenges is Listopia on Goodreads. Here is the link:

https://www.goodreads.com/list

On the right side of the page, near the top, you type in a request such as French Authors and hit the Search button and a bunch of lists of books will pop up. You can look through these to find more World Fiction type of books.


message 14: by Heena (new)

Heena Rathore Pardeshi (heenarathore) | 2134 comments Mod
#1 Phantom Limb by Lucinda Berry - 4/5

My 3rd book by the author (in one week!) and it did not disappoint! I loved it but again a lot of triggers and based on very sensitive topics (child abuse, disassociation, grief, loss, etc.)


message 15: by Heena (last edited Sep 02, 2019 06:37AM) (new)

Heena Rathore Pardeshi (heenarathore) | 2134 comments Mod
T wrote: "Thanks a lot for the list! I was wondering if books like The Diary of a Young Girl or I Am Malala: The Story of the Girl Who Stood Up for Education and Was Shot by the Taliban fall under this category because although they are not fiction they do have this refugee theme going on in them. Do you think they fall under this category? "

As Cheryl said, non-fiction cannot be included in World Fiction.


message 16: by Dagny (new)

Dagny (madamevauquer) | 3160 comments Mod
Oh, it's World FICTION. I didn't even notice that. Shoot, there goes Out of Africa. It will remain languishing on my shelf. Good thing the question was asked and Cheryl and Heena set me straight.


message 17: by Heena (new)

Heena Rathore Pardeshi (heenarathore) | 2134 comments Mod
Dagny wrote: "Oh, it's World FICTION. I didn't even notice that. Shoot, there goes Out of Africa. It will remain languishing on my shelf. Good thing the question was asked and Cheryl and Heena set me straight."

Sorry, Dagny. I initially wanted to include non-fiction in it, but then we would have had to change the name of the genre to include fiction and non-fiction both :(


message 18: by Heena (new)

Heena Rathore Pardeshi (heenarathore) | 2134 comments Mod
This challenge is pretty easy for me because I am from India and I read books mostly from America or Europe so I can include all these books :D


message 19: by Heena (last edited Sep 03, 2019 05:45AM) (new)

Heena Rathore Pardeshi (heenarathore) | 2134 comments Mod
#2 The Shining by Stephen King - 5/5
Started this 2 months back but was able to finish it now as it proved to be a tough read because of a couple of issues I had. As always it was a brilliant read and kept me up for nights!

#3 The First Mistake by Sandie Jones - 3/5
A very predictable read. The writing was okay but the characterization was poorly done.

#4 What My Sister Knew by Lina Laurin - 4/5
A good thriller with great writing. The plot was okay but the characterization was really good (unlike the earlier book.)


message 20: by Dagny (new)

Dagny (madamevauquer) | 3160 comments Mod
#1 I Feel Bad About My Neck: And Other Thoughts on Being a Woman
For the humor portion. A bit of a bust really. It was ok and fine for listening while doing other things. Got some laughs out of it but glad it wasn't too long.


message 21: by Adelaide (new)

Adelaide Blair | 358 comments Dagny wrote: "#1 I Feel Bad About My Neck: And Other Thoughts on Being a Woman
For the humor portion. A bit of a bust really. It was ok and fine for listening while doing other things. Got some laugh..."


I also did not care for it much. I don't think Nora Ephron is really my cup of tea.


message 22: by Cheryl (last edited Sep 04, 2019 10:28AM) (new)

Cheryl | 1892 comments Mod
1.) Slumdog Millionaire by Vikas Swarup (World Fiction - India)
3 stars. Some of the specifics of the story were different than the movie version, but the basic story was the same.


message 23: by Adelaide (last edited Sep 04, 2019 04:54PM) (new)

Adelaide Blair | 358 comments 1) History. A Mess. by Sigrún Pálsdóttir. Icelandic novel that is too artsy for its own good. (PhD student discovers her thesis is based on a misunderstanding and goes crazy. Maybe? I dunno.) 2 stars.


message 24: by Fran (new)

Fran | 462 comments I'm going for Level 3 for this challenge. Neither genre are my cup of tea.


message 25: by JJ (new)

JJ (bureign) | 7 comments Recently finished Italo Calvino's The Baron in the Trees which was very nice! Currently reading Love in the Time of Cholera and hoping to pick up Kafka on the Shore sometime :) Best of luck to everyone participating in this challenge!


message 26: by Fran (new)

Fran | 462 comments For humor I completed:

1.) I Am America (and So Can You!) (AB) - Stephen Colbert

Didn't care for it. He is much better in person for a short period of time, but it was tedious as an audiobook, despite the fact he narrated it.


message 27: by Cheryl (new)

Cheryl | 1892 comments Mod
Fran wrote: " Didn't care for it. He is much better in person for a short period of time, but it was tedious as an audiobook, despite the fact he narrated it. "

Fran,

I know what you mean. I think I'd rather watch something funny than read it, as I often need to see facial expressions, body movement, and rhythms in speech to find something really funny.


message 28: by Fran (new)

Fran | 462 comments That was my biggest problem Cheryl. Completely agree


message 29: by Cheryl (last edited Sep 06, 2019 09:23PM) (new)

Cheryl | 1892 comments Mod
2.) The Plotters bu Un-su Kim (World Fiction - South Korea)
4 stars. A well-written crime novel about assasins-for-hire.


message 30: by Cheryl (new)

Cheryl | 1892 comments Mod
3.) Captain Alatriste by Arturo Perez-Reverte (World Fiction - Spain)
3 star historical fiction


message 31: by Cheryl (new)

Cheryl | 1892 comments Mod
4.) The Sleeping Beauty Proposal by Sarah Strohmeyer (Humor)
2 stars


message 32: by Cheryl (new)

Cheryl | 1892 comments Mod
5.) Hold Me Closer, Necromancer by Lish McBride (Humor)
3 stars. YA urban paranormal fantasy, with humor.


message 33: by Adelaide (last edited Sep 11, 2019 10:25PM) (new)

Adelaide Blair | 358 comments 2) A Devil Comes to Town by Paolo Maurensig. 2.5 stars. An Italian literary novel where a devil comes to town under the guise of being a book publisher. Meh.


message 34: by Cheryl (new)

Cheryl | 1892 comments Mod
Adelaide wrote: "2) A Devil Comes to Town by Paolo Maurensig. 2.5 stars. And Italian literary novel where a devil comes to town under the guise of being a book publisher. Meh."

Do you think the story was poorly written, or was it a bad translation?


message 35: by Adelaide (new)

Adelaide Blair | 358 comments Cheryl wrote: "Adelaide wrote: "2) A Devil Comes to Town by Paolo Maurensig. 2.5 stars. And Italian literary novel where a devil comes to town under the guise of being a book publi..."

Neither really. It just wasn't that interesting. I think it's supposed to be an allegory, but the point wasn't entirely clear.


message 36: by Ashley (new)


message 37: by Fran (new)

Fran | 462 comments 2.) The Worst Night Ever (AB) - Dave Barry (Humor)
3.) Good Omens (AB) - Terry Pratchett/Neil Gaiman (Humor)


message 38: by Fran (new)

Fran | 462 comments 4.) Seriously...I'm Kidding (AB) - Ellen DeGeneres (Humor)


message 39: by Cheryl (new)

Cheryl | 1892 comments Mod
6.) The Inimitable Jeeves by P. G. Wodehouse (Humor)
3 stars


message 40: by Cheryl (new)

Cheryl | 1892 comments Mod
7.) The Kite Runner by Khaled Hosseini (World Fiction - Afghanistan)
4 stars


message 41: by Heena (last edited Sep 15, 2019 07:27PM) (new)

Heena Rathore Pardeshi (heenarathore) | 2134 comments Mod
#5 Heaven's Silhouette by Melissa Lynn Herold - 4/5
A decent start to a new fantasy series centred around angels.

#6 Maybe the Dream Knows What is Real by Steve Grogan - 2.5/5
An okay-ish book with weak characterization but a decent plot.


message 42: by Adelaide (new)

Adelaide Blair | 358 comments 3) Stay with Me by Ayọ̀bámi Adébáyọ̀. 4 stars. Nigerian novel about a very complicated marriage.


message 43: by Cheryl (new)

Cheryl | 1892 comments Mod
Maybe it’s just me and the books I choose, but I’m finding alot of sad/depressing stories in the World Fiction books. The Kite Runner just about killed me! Can anyone recommend a lighter World Fiction book?


message 44: by Adelaide (new)

Adelaide Blair | 358 comments Cheryl wrote: "Maybe it’s just me and the books I choose, but I’m finding alot of sad/depressing stories in the World Fiction books. The Kite Runner just about killed me! Can anyone recommend a lighter World Fict..."

I think a lot of foreign stuff that gets translated into English is literary fiction and murder stories, hence the depression.


message 45: by Cheryl (new)

Cheryl | 1892 comments Mod
8.) The Kings of London by William Shaw (World Fiction - England)
4 stars. Well-written police procedural mystery set in 1968 London.


message 46: by Adelaide (new)

Adelaide Blair | 358 comments 4) Vacationland: True Stories from Painful Beaches by John Hodgman. 4 stars. Humorous memoir-type thingy.


message 47: by Dagny (new)

Dagny (madamevauquer) | 3160 comments Mod
Cheryl wrote: "Can anyone recommend a lighter World Fiction book"

Well, the one I'm reading is Rosshalde by Hermann Hesse. Not depressing yet, but it IS Hesse, so not recommending that one.

Here's one for you though that I had actually marked for the humor portion (when I gathering non-fiction for the World category).
The Wheels of Chance: A Bicycling Idyll
It will also count as a Classic plus, if you listen, it will fit the Audio Challenge. It's available free at Project Gutenberg and LibriVox. The brief summary at LibriVox: "The Wheels of Chance - A Bicycling Idyll follows the adventures of a Drapers Assistant who, having brought an ancient bicycle, sets off on a 2 week tour of the countryside. And his world will never be the same again.(Summary by annise)" It's about six hours long.
http://www.gutenberg.org/ebooks/1264
https://librivox.org/the-wheels-of-ch...


message 48: by Cheryl (new)

Cheryl | 1892 comments Mod
Thanks, Dagny!


message 49: by Cheryl (new)

Cheryl | 1892 comments Mod
9.) Harbor by John Ajvide Lindqvist (World Fiction -Sweden)
3 and a half stars. This horror story is by the author of Let the Right One In. My review can be found here: https://www.goodreads.com/review/show...


message 50: by Fran (new)

Fran | 462 comments 5.) American Housewife (AB) - Helen Ellis (Humor)
6.) The Color Of Magic (PB) - Terry Pratchett (Humor)


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