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Short Stories & Collections > Jerusalem's Lot-NS

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message 1: by Angie, Constant Reader (new) - rated it 5 stars

Angie | 2568 comments Mod
Discuss story here!


message 2: by Angie, Constant Reader (new) - rated it 5 stars

Angie | 2568 comments Mod
This confused me a little. I know it is tied to Salem's Lot.. but I was still confused. Anyone else?


message 3: by Chris , The Hardcase (new) - rated it 4 stars

Chris  (haughtc) | 1104 comments Mod
Yes. This story was said to be his tribute to Lovecraft, which might explain some of the confusion.

What this story does is give us a glimpse into the ancient history of 'Salem's Lot, before vampires moved there. He goes back a century or two and shows how evil manifested in that area well before Barlow took up residence. If you remember, the novel told of that too, with the Marsten house...


Kandice | 4058 comments Because I loved Salem's Lot, I wanted to love this too, but I don't like Lovecraft. It was very hard for me to slog through. I understood it, but it was too much work for me to really enjoy it.


message 5: by Angie, Constant Reader (new) - rated it 5 stars

Angie | 2568 comments Mod
Thanks Chris. I was wondering about the evil church.... and the worm thing. It didn't seem like vamps to me yet it was in the same town.


message 6: by Chris , The Hardcase (new) - rated it 4 stars

Chris  (haughtc) | 1104 comments Mod
Yeah...it was the Evil about the area itself that attracted Barlow to it....


message 7: by Michael (new)

Michael Roberts (michaelroberts) I just finished Salem's Lot recently, so I was really jazzed to read this story. And I absolutely loved it. It certainly reads differently than most other stuff I've read by King, but I loved the letters and journal entries as a narrative device. So much can be revealed simply by who wrote the journal / letter. Is this character still alive? I don't know, but he isn't the one writing this journal.


message 8: by Angie, Constant Reader (new) - rated it 5 stars

Angie | 2568 comments Mod
I love the letters too! I think this type of book/story are known as epistolary novels, And I love them!


message 9: by Chris , The Hardcase (new) - rated it 4 stars

Chris  (haughtc) | 1104 comments Mod
If y'all like the letters method of telling a story, there's a classic you must read: Dracula by Bram Stoker


Rachel | 701 comments Chris wrote: "If y'all like the letters method of telling a story, there's a classic you must read: Dracula by Bram Stoker"

I want to, someday, read Dracula. Read Frankenstein, the language made it hard to get through at my usual breakneck speed which frustrated me.


Betsy Boo (betsyboo) | 195 comments I, too, had a difficult time with FRANKESTEIN, but I promise you Rachel...DRACULA is a much easier read.


Kandice | 4058 comments I really enjoyed Frankenstein, but agree that Dracula was a much quicker read. I've read reviews where people felt it droned on, so missed important bits of action and had to re-read sections. I ever felt that way, though. I thought it was great, if a little slow.


Bondama (kerensa) | 868 comments Angie, you are quite right -- Epistolary novels are the "proper" term for a story told in letters. One of my all-time favorite vamps, The Comte de St. Germain, is a recurring character in the epistolary novels of Chelsea Quinn Yarbro. Excellent books, although the history can get very dry at times.


Kandice | 4058 comments My favorite Epistolary is Les Liaisons Dangereuses. The worst I ever read-Poor Folk.


message 15: by Angie, Constant Reader (new) - rated it 5 stars

Angie | 2568 comments Mod
Ooooh there are so many of these types of books out there I didn't even know about!


message 16: by Anna (new) - rated it 4 stars

Anna | 64 comments I just finished reading Jerusalems Lot. I did enjoy the style of the writing--letters and journals made it easier for me to read and quicker.

It was intersting to see the origin of the evil on Jerusalems lot before the vampires came around...and to see how the bloodline always called them back to this place. Any idea if Barlow is connected to the boone family since he was attracted to the evil?


message 17: by Angie, Constant Reader (new) - rated it 5 stars

Angie | 2568 comments Mod
I thought he was connected to the Boones. This story made it seem that way at least.


alicia grant (shesha34) It was a decent story since it's been so long since I read Salem's Lot I was a bit confused but now that i have been on here i get it.


message 19: by Mary (new) - rated it 4 stars

Mary | 35 comments I think it was Chris who mentioned Lovecraft. And that is what I got out of it too. It seem to have that feel to it and the creature thing at the end really sounded like something from Cthulhu Mythos.
I really like the epistolary telling of the story too gave it that added creepy feel.




Katarina (katarinaw) | 62 comments Michael wrote: "I just finished Salem's Lot recently, so I was really jazzed to read this story. And I absolutely loved it. It certainly reads differently than most other stuff I've read by King, but I loved the l..."

I had also finished Salem's Lot not long before reading this short story. I loved both! To me Salem's Lot is the scariest story Uncle Stevie has ever written (and one of the best!) so returning to that haunted place with this short story was just... perfect!

I have yet to read something by Lovecraft, but if his stories in any way resembles Jerusalem's Lot, I'll probably turn into an avid Lovecraft reader. :)


message 21: by [deleted user] (new)

I've read Lovecraft and King pretty much nails his style. This is a favorite of mine. I agree with several of you who write that the epistolary style adds to the tension of the story. It's a really good early story from King and I wonder if it was written before or after he started writing the novel?


Kandice | 4058 comments I think he's said it was written before.


message 23: by [deleted user] (new)

Thanks, Kandice.


Amanda M. Lyons (amandamlyons) Jesse wrote: "Thanks, Kandice."

There's also a post Salem's Lot short story called One More for the Road in one of his short story collections. That was neat to read.


message 25: by Yolanda (new)

Yolanda | 2 comments I love Jerusalem's Lot I think because it does remind me of Dracula. I will say that I did not read Jerusalem's Lot but listened to the audio version and that the narrator (John Glover) does a fantastic reading of this story. Maybe that's what made it for me...anyway, great story!


Scott | 401 comments Amanda wrote: "Jesse wrote: "Thanks, Kandice."

There's also a post Salem's Lot short story called One More for the Road in one of his short story collections. That was neat to read."


"One for the Road" was also in Night Shift. I think that was my favorite from the collection.


message 27: by Dan (new) - added it

Dan (dan2345) | 169 comments One for the Road was awesome!


message 28: by Tony (new) - rated it 4 stars

Tony Talbot I love Victorian ghost - horror stories, and this is a great one. I love the roll and feel of the language in it, the melodrama of it all. And the epistolary style is wonderful. One of his best.


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