You'll love this one...!! A book club & more discussion

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Chit Chat About Books > Non-fiction corner

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message 1: by John (new)

John I was thinking that it would be nice to have one central place to put those occasional non-fiction books that we read.


message 2: by Molly (new)

Molly | 270 comments Nice idea John - I read them much more than occasionally. If you consider Memoirs to be NF that is.


message 3: by Beth (new)

Beth Diiorio (beth_diiorio) I like this idea, too! You inspired me to create a "non-fiction" shelf for the books I've read. I'll pass along anything worthwhile. Presently, I would recommend Kluge The Haphazard Construction of the Human Mind and Last Child in the Woods Saving Our Children from Nature-Deficit Disorder .


message 4: by John (new)

John He are a few of the NF books I have really enjoyed. "A Short History of Progress", "Colour", "History of the World in Six Glasses", and "River of Doubt".


message 5: by Ally (new)

Ally (goodreadscomuser_allhug) I've got [Book: Reading Lolita in Tehran] on my TBR pile - I've read the first chapter (...as I do with most of my books as soon as I buy them) and it looks really promising!

Ally


message 6: by John (new)

John I am about to start "Animal, Vegetable, Miracle" - Barbara Kingsolver. One of my favorite authors and her family try to live for a year on what they produce on their own property


message 7: by Molly (new)

Molly | 270 comments I just began The Innocent Man Murder and Injustice in a Small Town by Grisham. Curious to see how his writing form translates to NF.


message 8: by Emma (new)

Emma | 80 comments Wild Swans Three Daughters of China

Should be set reading for everyone!


message 9: by Jenny, Group Creator - Honorary Moderator (new)

Jenny (notestothemoon) | 846 comments Absolutely love that book Emma. It is one of the best books I have ever read!


message 10: by Donna (new)

Donna (electrogirl68) | 116 comments If cookery books are allowed here I'd highly recommend The Silver Spoon. Its the definitive Italian cookery book.


message 11: by Charmian (new)

Charmian (clo1) | 26 comments Jenny wrote: "Absolutely love that book Emma. It is one of the best books I have ever read!" Me too




message 12: by John (new)

John Just finished "My Favorite Things 75 Works of Art from Around the World". I really enjoyed this book mainly because it didn't just have the same tired old things you usually see. Sister Wendy includes paintings, sculptures, ceramics, pottery etc. Her example of Michelangelo is a stairway. Who knew he designed stairways? Wonderful pictures!


message 13: by John (new)

John Auto racing is not everyone's cup of tea but I am really looking forward to the book I just started "Top 100 F1 Drivers of All Time". Of course it is one man's opinion but I am anxious to find out where my favorites are ranked.


message 14: by [deleted user] (new)


message 15: by John (new)

John Finally finished "Animal, Vegetable, Miracle" by Barbara Kingsolver. I know we all can't go out and live on a farm or grow food in our back yards, but this book will be a success if you just start thinking about where your food comes from and try sourcing some locally.


message 16: by Terri (new)

Terri (terrilovescrows) | 34 comments I am reading Think No Evil about the Amish Schoohouse shootings


message 17: by John (last edited Nov 26, 2009 10:55AM) (new)

John Terri wrote: "I am reading Think No Evil about the Amish Schoohouse shootings"

This book sounds very interesting, tragic but interesting. Have you read "Under the Bridge". It is a book about a group of school kids who beat up and killed one of their classmates who just wanted to fit in with them. The girl's parents are like the Amish, they are pillars of strength, grace and forgiveness. The killing took place here in my home town and the book brought out a lot of facts not presented in the media or the trial coverage. I would be interested to hear what you thought of "Think No Evil" when you have read it.




message 18: by Karen (new)

Karen (karenf) | 20 comments I just finished Truth & Beauty A Friendship by Ann Patchett and it really turned me off. Now I no longer want to read Lucy Grealy's Autobiography of a Face. It seems like Patchett's only reason for publishing this was pure profit and publicity--it paints her friend Lucy in such a negative light. I was told I should have read Autobiography of a Face by Lucy Grealy first. But at this point, I don't care to read it at all.


message 19: by Sam (new)

Sam (ecowitch) | 2080 comments Finished A Farther Shore Ireland's Long Road to Peace by Gerry Adams on the weekend and it must be the most biased book I've ever read in my entire life. It was interesting to see his perspective but my god that man lives in a serious bubble.


message 20: by Terri (new)

Terri (terrilovescrows) | 34 comments John wrote: "Terri wrote: "I am reading Think No Evil about the Amish Schoohouse shootings"

This book sounds very interesting, tragic but interesting. Have you read "Under the Bridge". It is a book about a gro..."


I will ahve to see if I can find it, it sounds interesting



message 21: by Brenda (new)

Brenda | 70 comments The Education of an American Dreamer How a Son of Greek Immigrants Learned His Way from a Nebraska Diner to Washington, Wall Street, and Beyond

The Snowball Warren Buffett and the Business of Life

The Glass Castle

Angela's Ashes


message 22: by Chrissie (new)

Chrissie I am a new member and I really liked both Wild Swans Three Daughters of China and The River of Doubt Theodore Roosevelt's Darkest Journey mentioned above. Another memoir that I recently read and liked alot is Eleni. I will look at my shelves and see what else I can recommend.....


message 23: by Chrissie (new)

Chrissie OK, I checked out my memoir shelf and picked these:
The House by the Dvina A Russian Childhood
Surely You're Joking, Mr. Feynman! Adventures of a Curious Character
The Seamstress

Actrually I have lots more. Check out my memoir shelf if you are interested.


message 24: by John (new)

John The upcoming movie "Young Victoria" influenced my next read. It is "More Leaves from the Journal of a Life in the Highlands" - by Queen Victoria. The book is a compilation of letters mostly written by Queen Victoria between 1862 and 1883. The start was just eight months after her beloved Prince Albert died. The book was published in 1884, so being 125 years old it is not in the best of shape. It will have to be a gentle read.


message 25: by Beth (new)

Beth Diiorio (beth_diiorio) Recently finished Um. . . Slips, Stumbles, and Verbal Blunders, and What They Mean (gave it 3 stars). No linguistic stone was left unturned in this very well-researched book about our pauses and gaffes when we speak. At times, it felt too stretched out though and I had to make myself keep reading. However, the topic itself intrigued me.


message 26: by John (new)

John I just finished "More Leaves". It was in interesting but somewhat repetitive book of Queen Victoria's travels around the Scottish Highlands by foot, coach and horseback. She love to stop for lunch or tea and do a little sketching. There are also a few entries of her dedicating statues.

Some of the more interesting tales were of her getting caught in the rain and stopping for "tea and whiskey". Or the time her carriage tipped over. She had to sit on the ground leaning against the upturned carriage for hours while Brown freed a horse and rode for a replacement carriage. QV also liked to describe in detail the houses or manors they stayed in. Some things never change for the Royals; "we were spied upon by impudently inquisitive reporters who followed us everywhere".

The book also expanded my vocabulary with words like nosegay, gillies, mutch, leistering, creel, pibroch and pennon.


message 27: by John (new)

John Just finished reading "Hiroshima" by John Hersey. A very interesting and scary book on the effects of the atomic bomb on six survivors.

Now I am starting "The Film Club". David Gilmour's son has no interest in school so Gilmour says we will let his son drop out if the two of them sit down, watch and discuss three movies per week - of Gilmour's choosing.


message 28: by Molly (new)

Molly | 270 comments John wrote: "Now I am starting "The Film Club". David Gilmour's son has n..."

Oooo - I have had this one on my to read list for about a year - I am anxious to read it - your thoughts will help bump it up or knock it down.




message 29: by John (new)

John My 59th and last book of 2009 was "Legendary Race Cars", a wonderful Christmas present. There were 25 stories of 25 diverse racing cars. it is a coffee table style book full of beautiful photos.


message 30: by John (last edited Jan 09, 2010 03:38PM) (new)

John My next book is a non fiction about a fictional character; "Zorro Unmasked - the Official history". Just yesterday my sister picked up season 1 of Zorro, the old Walt Disney series starring Guy Williams. A childhood hero of mine!


message 31: by Kirsty (new)

Kirsty | 1 comments hey im kirsty


message 32: by John (new)

John Just about to start "Ark Royal" - story of the famous WW2 aircraft carrier.


message 33: by Mary (new)

Mary Not everybody's cup of tea but I'm engrossed in Pan MacMillan's Absolute War: Soviet Russia in the second World War by Chris Bellamy. Nearly 700 pages (without bibliography and index), it's a long read, slow -to take it all in- but fascinating.


message 34: by Larry (last edited Feb 17, 2010 12:53PM) (new)

Larry (hal9000i) Anything to do with nature and science-currently on David Attenborough's Life in the Undergrowth, slowly!
I'd also recommend The Red Hourglass: Lives of the Predators,by Gordon Grice Wonderful Life: The Burgess Shale and the Nature of History by Stephen Jay Gould,and King Solomon's Ring by Konrad Lorenz


message 35: by John (new)

John Time for a little travel. I am starting "Miles From Nowhere: A Round-the-World bicycle Adventure.


message 36: by Veronica (new)

Veronica (veronicay) I'm reading Nicola Humble's Culinary Pleasure: Cookbooks and the Transformation of British Food. If like me you are an inveterate collector of British cookbooks, I think you would enjoy it. It's a survey of British cookbooks and cooking habits since Mrs Beeton and is quite astute and entertaining.


message 37: by Terri (new)

Terri (terrilovescrows) | 34 comments I just finished Depraved by Harld Schecter about serial killer HH Holmes


message 38: by John (new)

John I just started Operation Cicero, the story of a spy in neutral Turkey during the second world war. This story was made into a movie called "5 Fingers" starring James Mason.


message 39: by Veronica (new)

Veronica (veronicay) I've started The Soul of a New Machine, which I've been meaning to read for literally decades. It's the story of the creation of a computer in the late 1970s, but you don't need to know about computers to enjoy it; it's really about the people who made the computer.


message 40: by Carol (new)

Carol Neman | 41 comments John wrote: "Just finished reading "Hiroshima" by John Hersey. A very interesting and scary book on the effects of the atomic bomb on six survivors.

Now I am starting "The Film Club". David Gilmour's son has n..."


I remember reading about that happening right when it came out, and being intrigued by the circumstances. I wondered if a person could really get an education by just watching movies. I mean, wouldn't you have to have some kind of math and English grammar, too?? Aside from that, I thought the kid was really lucky to be able to do that (although I love school and studying) as I really love movies (and TV but not as much). Actually I've always maintained that I taught myself everything I know, from movies, TV, books and magazines...so perhaps a kid raised on that wouldn't turn out too badly after all.

Think I'll try to find it in the library sometime soon, but as always 'so many books, so little time.'


message 41: by John (new)

John I am about to start Never Shoot a Stampede Queen: A Rookie Reporter in the Cariboo. It is sort of local because it takes place in Williams Lake B.C.


message 42: by John (new)

John I am about to start Never Shoot a Stampede Queen: A Rookie Reporter in the Cariboo. It is sort of local because it takes place in Williams Lake B.C.


message 43: by Larry (new)

Larry (hal9000i) Yea i'm making my way through Life in the Undergrowth by David Attenborough , by David Attenborough. Great stuff!


message 44: by Carol (new)

Carol Neman | 41 comments Larry wrote: "Yea i'm making my way through Life in the Undergrowth by David Attenborough, by David Attenborough. Great stuff!"

I just read some of the reviews when I clicked on the link, everyone was raving about it...sounds good to me. Maybe I will have time to give it a try...


message 45: by John (new)

John Just finished a fiction book set in Australia. Now I am going to stay in the southern hemisphere reading Travels in a Thin Country: A Journey Through Chile


message 46: by John (new)

John Time for a biography Ayrton Senna: The Whole Story, one of the best ever in Formula 1.


message 47: by Cheryl (last edited May 30, 2010 05:21PM) (new)

Cheryl (cherylllr) I'm interested in grammar/ language books, so Beth I've added Um. . .: Slips, Stumbles, and Verbal Blunders, and What They Mean to my wishlist.

I also loved The Meme Machine and so I've been reading lots of evolutionary biology, social biology, and psychology ever since. Recommendations desired!

I was lucky enough to win a first-reads giveaway, Being Wrong: Adventures in the Margin of Error, and am enjoying it right now. It's not as great as it could be but it is interesting.


message 49: by Cheryl (new)

Cheryl (cherylllr) Update - Being Wrong wasn't very good; I wrote a long review if anyone's interested.


message 50: by Cheryl (new)

Cheryl (cherylllr) Thanks for the recommendations Ally!


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