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William Faulkner

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message 1: by Gary (new)

Gary | 54 comments What Faulkner books have you read?? Any comments, or discussion on those? Perceptions on Faulkner???


message 2: by Gary (new)

Gary | 54 comments http://www.goodreads.com/review/show/...

check out this thread on AS I LAY DYING. any comments to add?? "anyone??? anyone???" (what movie did that line come from?? lol!)


message 3: by [deleted user] (new)

Well, I'll respond, since I'm pleased to be able to say that I finally read Faulkner, which is something I'd been wanting to do all my adult life, and something that I managed to escape all through high school and college--somehow. I'm a slow reader, and a bit lazy when it comes to books, preferring the economy of writers like Hemingway and Muriel Spark, but I knew that I was missing something. I tried reading The Sound and the Fury twice but didn't get very far. Then I read Go Down Moses, which drew me in because I could read it in sections. Then I went on to Absalom, Absalom!, which I'd consider a life-changing experience. I'm not sure where to go from here. Any suggestions?
PS I laughed when I read Shane's review of As I Lay Dying. It seems I am not the only one who has resisted reading Faulkner. Sometimes the best things in life take effort, don't you think?


message 4: by Gary (new)

Gary | 54 comments yes, Kathleen. exactly. i find faulkner a definate challenge to read, but in the long run, the effort is worth it. i ended up loving all the books you mentioned above, as well as THE SOUND AND THE FURY. i did the same thing. read it in chunks,and realized that each character is telling their side of the same story, with their different perspectives.

i also recommend one of his short stories. A ROSE FOR EMILY. great story for halloween, which is coming up soon, before we know it!!!


message 5: by [deleted user] (new)

Gary wrote: "yes, Kathleen. exactly. i find faulkner a definate challenge to read, but in the long run, the effort is worth it. i ended up loving all the books you mentioned above, as well as THE SOUND AND THE..."

Gary wrote: "yes, Kathleen. exactly. i find faulkner a definate challenge to read, but in the long run, the effort is worth it. i ended up loving all the books you mentioned above, as well as THE SOUND AND THE..."

Thanks, Gary. I have A Rose for Emily in a book of assorted short stories. I'll be sure to read it.


message 6: by Gary (new)

Gary | 54 comments You are most welcome, Kathleen. I am going to ask you to be my friend. Hope you'll accept. Gary


message 7: by [deleted user] (new)

Gary wrote: "You are most welcome, Kathleen. I am going to ask you to be my friend. Hope you'll accept. Gary"

I'd be delighted. Thanks.


message 8: by Eric (new)

Eric (Balsagoth) | 64 comments I'm glad that i'm not the only one that finds a challenge in his work. I have to try again as i have five or so on the shelf but was not drawn in as i thought i might be. Thanks for the new spark!


message 9: by Tracy (last edited Sep 22, 2009 09:28AM) (new)

Tracy | 3 comments My favorite Faulkner is "Absalom, Absalom!" Its sense of mystery and finely drawn characters, kept me engaged throughout. AA is a layered, well-plotted novel that tantalizes and tricks.


message 10: by Michael (new)

Michael Tracy wrote: "My favorite Faulkner is "Absalom, Absalom!"

I would definitely second that, Tracy! The first time I read it, it was quite difficult, but something about his language kept me going. The second time I read it, it flowed much easier. I'm getting ready to read it a third time. My second reading opened up new meanings and discoveries, and I can't wait for my third reading.

Michael




message 11: by Tracy (last edited Sep 22, 2009 05:16PM) (new)

Tracy | 3 comments Glad to find another fan of one of my favorite novels, Michael! For me, "The Sound and The Fury" was the more challenging read, especially at the outset. Its ending completely hooked me; I am still shocked by its brilliance. It is still my favorite scene in all of Faulkner. In the end, however, I am partial to "Absalom Absolom!" because the authenticity of its characters-- they are so much more than mere literary constructs.


message 12: by Tracy (new)

Tracy | 3 comments Thanks, Charles! "Light in August" is the next Faulkner that I plan to read, and you've made me even more eager to get started!


message 13: by Gary (last edited Oct 09, 2009 07:56AM) (new)

Gary | 54 comments I made the trek to Oxford, Charles, after talking to the chamber of commerce on the phone. they told me that rowan oak was open for tours! i loved SQUARE BOOKS. bought a copy of THE SOUND AND THE FURY there. Then after spending the night, went to Rowan Oak,and after driving all the way from St. Louis , Missouri, there was a big sign on the door that it was closed for the summer for renovations. i was furious! so..... i hope to go back,and actually tour the house. i was so disappointed! i complained to the chamber,and they said they knew it,and the person that didn't tell me it was closed had already been fired for giving out the wrong information. i felt a bit guilty of that, but the guy assured me she was already gone,and not my fault exactly. he took down my name and number,and told me to go to the visitors center,and they would issue me a free ticket to tour the house.

have you heard about the faulkner collection at southeast missouri state university?? i'd be happy to share that info with you. my bookclub went there to see it,and it was so cool. a whole room full of first editions of faulkner's books,and memorabilia!!!


message 14: by Nick (new)

Nick (doily) | 25 comments Michael wrote: "Tracy wrote: "My favorite Faulkner is "Absalom, Absalom!"

I would definitely second that, Tracy! The first time I read it, it was quite difficult, but something about his language kept me goin..."


I, too, considered my first read of Absalom, Absalom! a life changing experience. That was 21 years ago. I set a date for the first week in August every year to read a Faulkner novel. Every third year it's a re-read of AA. This last August was my seventh go round. I love the four unreliable narrators structure. I love the puzzlework that goes into solving, or trying to solve, the dilemma of this Sutpen clan that is so reflective of the strange southern society our country created in the nineteenth century. I love how Faulkner shows how these ghosts still haunt us all.

Though I've read most of the major novels, there are a few I am "saving" as special treats sometime. One of these is Light in August. It is good to read threads about it here...sort of inspires me. But as with everything else, there are so many books and so little time. ---and there's something special about having that "treat" in store for some future date.


message 15: by Michael (new)

Michael Nick wrote: "I set a date for the first week in August every year to read a Faulkner novel."

What a novel idea (no pun intended!), Nick!! I know you like to "save" reading some of the novels, and I can certainly understand the idea of always wanting there to be another major work of his to discover, but have you read any of his major short stories? Quite a few are considered masterpieces -- and even the "minor" ones are quite a treat.




message 16: by Gary (new)

Gary | 54 comments Ok,Michael ,which short stories are your favorites? I like A ROSE FOR EMILY myself. Great one to read around halloween! I'd love to hear which ones you've read,and liked!


message 17: by Nick (new)

Nick (doily) | 25 comments Love, love, love the Faulkner short stories. My favorites are the ones with "Indian" themes: "Red Leaves," "A Courtship," and "The Old People" and "Delta Autumn" from "Go Down Moses." Faulkner's prose lives with this environmentalist idea that an individual's true geneaology stems from the blood steeped into the land on which he/she lives.


message 18: by Michael (new)

Michael Gary wrote: "Ok,Michael ,which short stories are your favorites?"

My two favorites are "Barn Burning" and "That Evening Sun Go Down".




message 19: by Matt (last edited Jan 12, 2010 07:17PM) (new)

Matt | 2 comments Last night I finished The Sound and the Fury for the first time and thought that it was excellent. Admittedly, I probably need to read Benjy and Quentin's sections a few more times as I probably missed a few things.

I also found a very entertaining interview with Faulkner on the Paris Review website:
http://www.parisreview.com/media/4954...


message 20: by Nelson (last edited Jan 13, 2010 07:04PM) (new)

Nelson | 17 comments tadpole wrote: "Last night I finished The Sound and the Fury for the first time and thought that it was excellent. Admittedly, I probably need to read Benjy and Quentin's sections a few more times as I probably mi..."

Thanks for linking the interview with the Paris review. That document is widely used as a source for Faulkner's quotes.

For me the best Faulkner novel would be Absalom, Absalom but The Sound and the Fury would run a very close second. He has so many great novels it's amazing (Light in August, Sanctuary, and Go Down Moses). His short stories are among the best ever written in our country. What a genius!



message 21: by Matt (new)

Matt | 2 comments Your welcome! Probably my favorite part of that interview was when asked to give advice to people who have read some of his books two or three times and still don't understand them Faulkner simply said "Read them four times."

I'm working through a plan to alternate my reading between Shakespeare and Faulkner this year and I think that my next Faulkner is going to be one of his lesser known works (most likely Mosquitoes) and then Absalom, Absalom after that.


message 22: by Victoria (new)

Victoria | 6 comments Nelson: It's so nice to see fellow Faulkner fans. I went to an all girl's school... no fans there. Our introductory book was As I Lay Dying, which I think is the best way to start with Faulkner. It helps a reader understand more about navigating through perception/reality/storytelling in Absalom, Absalom as well as The Sound and the Fury.

My personal favorites are also The Sound and the Fury and Light in August. Until I read The Crossing (C. McCarthy), I thought LIA was one of the most beautifully written violent books. If I had to pick two books to be stranded on a desert island, it would be those two.

It seems rare to me to have female fans of McCarthy and Faulkner. I made my all-female book club reading The Crossing and the book group disbanded immediately following!!!




message 23: by Ashley (new)

Ashley My husband and I are reading through half of the Faulkner canon this year...one of my more worthy resolutions. He's a writing and lit geek and I'm a speech therapist, so we're quite the nerdy pair. We've begun The Sound and the Fury and we're moving through in order of publication. This joint excursion into Faulkner will either foster a lifetime of mutual reading ventures or kill it immediately. I'm sure I'll be checking back to glean some of your collective wisdom.


message 24: by Nelson (new)

Nelson | 17 comments Victoria wrote: "Nelson: It's so nice to see fellow Faulkner fans. I went to an all girl's school... no fans there. Our introductory book was As I Lay Dying, which I think is the best way to start with Faulkner. It..."

It's funny you should mention McCarthy because the only author over the last year or so who's demanded as much of my attention as Faulkner is Cormac McCarthy. For several years before that I was on a big existentialist binge but now I'm going through a southern gothic phase. It's probably more appropriate for a boy from Alabama who's currently living in Memphis.

There aren't many Faulkner fans and all the fans I've met are men. In fact, a colleague of mine not long ago was praising John Grisham (gringe) and then in the same breath talked about what a bore Faulkner's books were (double cringe).

Have you ever read Flannery O'Connor? I've only been exposed to a few of her short stories but I picked up Wise Blood the other day at my local used bookstore. From what I've seen of her short stories it should be fun.


message 25: by Victoria (new)

Victoria | 6 comments Nelson wrote: "Victoria wrote: "Nelson: It's so nice to see fellow Faulkner fans. I went to an all girl's school... no fans there. Our introductory book was As I Lay Dying, which I think is the best way to start ..."

Ack: Faulkner boring?! Wow. Murder, mayhem, racism, suicide, dysfunctional families, rape, trials, and more. How can any of that be boring?

I am enjoying this exchange. I go through subject jags too. I went through an existentialist phase after I started reading McCarthy... I went from Blood Meridian to Horses to Crossing then I read all it earlier books (far too bleak), then his plays and The Road. I must admit that I skipped No Country for now.

Women don't often have Existential Crises... but I did have to get my mind and sense of humor into a more absurd state!!

I have nearly always been obsessed with Southern writers. O'Connor is fantastic. She has great mastery over the short story and novella. Completely different type of writer from Faulkner and McCathy, but just as meaty. O'Connor has an economy of words similar to Hemingway or Didion.

Wise Blood is an even better read if you have a formerly religious background. It is a dark comedy when you look at it in the right light (LOL!).

I hope you enjoy Wise Blood... My favorite O'Connor story is Revelation (Everything that Rise Must Converge collection)... or here in the Internet:
http://www.storybites.com/oconnorreve...

I think of myself often as the blue-faced girl. Even 25 years after reading the story for the first time, I still identify with this girl in the waiting room!

Thanks for writing back.

PS I have discovered the Scandinavians in 2009. There are some seriously great writers in Northern Europe! It's great to have something to obsess over!


message 26: by Gary (new)

Gary | 54 comments I bought THE COMPLETE STORIES OF FLANNERY O'CONNOR. with peacock feathers on the cover. she is great! my bookclub read WISE BLOOD,and we had a very stimulating,and rousing discussion about it. We thought parts of the book were hilarious,and parts pretty bleak. I loved it. I recommend Flannery to everyone that will listen to me!


message 27: by Gary (new)

Gary | 54 comments Thought people would find this of interest....Faulkner is awesome!



My Favorite Book: The Sound and the Fury
by Jamelah Earle on Tuesday, July 21, 2009 04:16 pm
Choosing favorite books is a daunting task for anyone who reads enough to have several favorites, and comparing them in order to decide which one is the true Favorite Book is a ridiculous task: they're all so different. I love Pride and Prejudice and I love On the Road, but I can't really find a comparison point between them, other than the fact that each is a series of words printed on pages and bound together in book form. So, when I'm asked what my favorite book is (and I do get asked), I usually go with something like "Oh, I have so many! This one is my favorite, and so is this one, and I can't forget about this one, and have you read this?" It's impossible. And yet, whenever I do this, I am keenly aware of two things:

1. It's a cop out.
2. Holding one book as a favorite above all the rest is not actually going to hurt the other books' feelings.

So I'm just going to come right out with it: my favorite book of all time is The Sound and the Fury by William Faulkner. There.

I understand why people give up on it and declare it unreadable, and think it is an impenetrable wall of modernist "Oooh, I'm in your thoughts" blabbity blah, but the truth is that it's not as difficult as it seems and the stuff you think you're not understanding at first starts to make sense as you move through the novel. Perhaps that's cold comfort for anybody who has tried to make it through the first section with Benjy and his bright shapes and Caddy smelling like trees, but it gets easier as it moves along.

The novel consists of four sections, each written from a different perspective, yet all of them come together brilliantly to tell the story of the Compson family: how things fall apart, and how life keeps moving on anyway. It’s almost audacious, the way life keeps doing that, moving on right in the face of our tragedies, as we watch everything that was supposed to be slip away. The book’s title comes from Shakespeare, Macbeth 5:5, ll. 22-31:

Tomorrow and tomorrow and tomorrow
Creeps in this petty pace from day to day
To the last syllable of recorded time,
And all our yesterdays have lighted fools
The way to dusty death. Out, out, brief candle!
Life’s but a walking shadow, a poor player
That struts and frets his hour upon the stage
And then is heard no more. It is a tale
Told by an idiot, full of sound and fury,
Signifying nothing.

Macbeth speaks these lines right after learning of his wife's death, when he's at the point of knowing that all his villainy has been for naught. The Compson family's story is different, of course, yet these lines resonate across the family's decline from greatness, across the expectations of how things should have been yet aren't, and all of it is distilled across the life of Benjy, the idiot, the book's beginning and end, who is unable to express himself except by wailing and crying.

At its core, the novel is about Caddy, the rebellious daughter, and the way she affects the lives of the others in her family by conceiving a child out of wedlock and attempting to cover it up with a hasty marriage to another man (which backfires). The key moment in the book is when Caddy, with muddy drawers, climbs a tree to look in a window and see the death of Damuddy, the grandmother, while her brothers stay on the ground looking up at her. It’s a moment that’s ripe with symbolism and its implications affect each of the boys -- Benjy, Quentin, Jason -- who tell their stories (and hers) in turn. Even if she's the catalyst, she doesn't get her own voice in the novel; everything she said and did is filtered through the thoughts and memories and remarks of others, and as a result, her picture emerges, but never truly comes into focus. Yet if we look back at Shakespeare for just a minute, the line that seems to sum her up the most is, "And all our yesterdays have lighted fools/ The way to dusty death." Of Caddy’s story, Faulkner said, “I tried first to tell it with one brother, and that wasn’t enough. That was Section One. I tried it with another brother, and that wasn’t enough. That was Section Two. I tried the third brother, because Caddy was still to me too beautiful and too moving to reduce her to telling what was going on, that it would be more passionate to see her through somebody else’s eyes, I thought. And that failed and I tried myself -- the fourth section -- to tell what happened, and I still failed.”

What an astoundingly beautiful series of failures. Though of course I’m not sure I agree that Faulkner failed -- writing so often feels like not being able to say what you want to say anyhow -- the cumulative effect of these sections is that the story of the Compson family’s decline comes through in fits and starts, fragments of thoughts and memories, comments and perceptions. That’s how stories tend to happen and get passed on. It all ends up feeling very organic somehow.

When we read, we tend to expect certain things out of a narrative, especially that it moves forward and we can follow its events -- this happened and then this and then this -- but with this novel, Faulkner dashes this expectation right from the beginning. Books are supposed to have expository moments, and we're supposed to be able to read and look around the world of the narrative and have a general idea where (and when) things are and what's happening, but the opening section of The Sound and the Fury (the most difficult section and the place where people are most likely to give up) does not do this. April Seventh, 1928 is told from the perspective of Benjy, who is, as the back cover of my copy of the book puts it, a "manchild." He doesn't talk and his brain doesn't think in a linear way, so in the space of a few sentences, it's possible to slip from the present action to sometime years and years in the past, without any sort of warning at all. Add on top of this the fact that Benjy experiences the world in details and not in the larger picture expository way that characters in novels often do (which allows readers to situate themselves within the world of the narrative) and what ends up happening is that it's hard to know what's going on at all. It's frustrating because it doesn't follow any sort of rules, and we're left scrambling to keep up (or tossing the book across the room in a fit of irritation). I understand this frustration, and I understand the impulse to want to untangle all the knots of language and lay them out in straight, easy-to-follow threads, but I also know that Benjy's section of the novel is written the way it is exactly on purpose and it's less important to figure everything out than it is to pick up on the details that Benjy hands us. We'll need those details later.

While most of the book takes place on different days in the same week in April, 1928, the second section dips into the past. It's written from the perspective of Quentin on the last day of his life, June Second, 1910. After making it through Benjy's section, you might expect a reprieve, and you get one, to a degree. It's not the most easy reading in the world, but there is a definite chain of events here, and though Quentin also deals in frequent flashbacks, at least his are easier to spot, since his present is clearly at Harvard and his past is clearly in Mississippi. Through Quentin's memories, the pieces of Caddy's story start falling into place; the images we saw as we remembered along with Benjy begin to fit into context. This one section of this one novel may in fact be the finest distillation of many of the themes that show up in Faulkner's other work. We have the big ones: race, class, gender, and the South that was and will never be again, the South that may have just been a daydream in the first place, all of it coming through poor, tortured Quentin whose thoughts are as thick and strangling as the heavy scent of honeysuckle that torments him.

In comparison to the first two sections of the novel, the back half of The Sound and the Fury is easy like Sunday morning. As soon as you get to "Once a bitch always a bitch, what I say," you know you're in the clear. Oh sure, you still have to deal with Jason's section (April Sixth, 1928), which is long and full of seething anger and kind of whiny to be honest, but it's also got some of that humor that Faulkner does so well, the kind that makes you wonder if you're supposed to think something is funny. (I honestly don't know if it's funny in places or if there's just something wrong with me.) And finally, April Eighth, 1928 is written in the third person. It follows Dilsey, the Compson family's servant, as she works in the house and takes Benjy to church. She's the one who cooks the meals and has mostly raised the children, and she seems to be suffering from arthritis, yet she continues working hard, climbing slowly and painfully up and down the stairs in the family home while the family seems to remain clueless. It also follows Jason as he deals with Caddy's daughter (also named Quentin) as she carries on her mother's legacy and pushes it further, signaling a deeper shift away from the way things were. The Sound and the Fury is always referred to as a tragedy, and it is one, but the ending always feels hopeful to me. It takes place on Easter Sunday, a day that's all about living again, and as the book winds to a close, life just keeps happening.

In the end, The Sound and the Fury is a beautiful book not just because the writing will blow your mind if you let it (provided you're the kind of person to love a book solely on the grounds of the writer's use of language, and if you are, you're my kind of person), but because it is about human beings. It's not all cold intellect and verbal manipulation, and it's not just an empty pile of dazzling, frustrating, confounding words. It's a book about life written from inside people's heads, not only capturing the how of thought, but also giving us the why. It's because of this that the book is touching and funny and sad and gorgeous, easily deserving its place as one of the greatest achievements in American literature. It's unfortunate that it gets dismissed as being unreadable because parts of it are difficult; it's got heart, man, and that is why it is worth the love.


message 28: by Judy (new)

Judy Vasseur | 23 comments Just saw a film based on a Faulkner short story: Tomorrow starring Robert Duvall. Thought it was well-done...I have not read the story.
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=73ZKI2...


message 29: by Nick (new)

Nick (doily) | 25 comments Judy wrote: "Just saw a film based on a Faulkner short story: Tomorrow starring Robert Duvall. Thought it was well-done...I have not read the story.
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=73ZKI2..."


The film is very good. And the story is very good -- it's a part of the collection Knight's Gambit. But the film changes the story a little bit. It's an interesting comparison.

There's also a play adaptation by Horton Foote that you might be able to get your hands on that is closer to the original story.


message 30: by Judy (new)

Judy Vasseur | 23 comments Thanks Nick. To meander off the Faulkner path for a second...Horton Foote...I saw a film by Foote last night that I thought was interesting and good: Convicts, again with Robert Duvall who was riveting.


message 31: by Zach (new)

Zach Irvin | 6 comments I just finished reading Go Down, Moses, and man, that was just amazing. I'd read the story The Bear before as an entity unto itself, and thought that it was a good story but failed to see until I read it in Go Down, Moses just how fantastic it actually is. The issues Faulkner writes about are so complex, which makes it all the more impressive that Faulkner is able to write with such ease. The man can certainly weave a yarn.


message 32: by Nick (last edited Nov 02, 2011 11:41AM) (new)

Nick (doily) | 25 comments I first read Absalom, Absalom! when in college, lo these many moons ago. It was assigned, but I found it enthralling. I then went, on my own, to The Sound and the Fury and Go Down, Moses, in that order. I'm not sure why I chose that order, but it worked out well.

I feel that "...Moses" is every bit the equal to the other two. From the opening comedy of "Was" to the impact of "The Old People" and "The Bear" the book is a wonder. And the way it stratifies the stories of the whites and the blacks in parallel fashion is just amazing, until we get to "Delta Autumn" where, in his old age, Isaac McCasslin is caught up in a whirlwind of ambiguities -- of time, race, nature. Just a marvelous read that creates a new concept of continuity.


message 33: by Shaun (new)

Shaun Birkett (shaunbirkett) | 5 comments I first discovered faulkner after reading Cormac McCarthy. The first book i read was As I Lay dying and thought it was one of the most wonderul things i ha read. That was until I read The Sound and the Fury. I think this has been the most challenging book I have ever read, especially Benjis chapter. Howevrr as th pieces started falling into place I was blown away by Faulkners artistic vision and the elegance of his prose. Im now unsure whether to read Light in August, Absalom, Sanctuary or Wild Springs next. Any help would be appreciated. Freind requests would also b welcomed so I can gain a further insight to Southern Lit, as i feel a passion brewing!


message 34: by [deleted user] (new)

Faulkner and I first met when I picked up Absalom! Absalom! and I felt instantly at home. He is a true story teller.


message 35: by Louis (new)

Louis (lgiusto) | 1 comments I've always wondered why no one ever mentions the Snopes Trilogy (The Hamlet, The Town, The Mansion). I found these to be very rewarding reads and believe they contain some of Faulkner's most fully realized characters.


message 36: by Zach (new)

Zach Irvin | 6 comments I'm kind of curious, what does everyone think of Faulkner in general. Not just his works but him as a person and artist that is so revered in American lit.


message 37: by [deleted user] (new)

Zach wrote: "I'm kind of curious, what does everyone think of Faulkner in general. Not just his works but him as a person and artist that is so revered in American lit."

I worked for an English professor who when in college himself decided to visit Faulkner who did not live far from this college. Faulkner let him and his friends in and then proceeded to sit on the staircase with his wife to listen to the ghost in his house. they sat there for maybe an hour or so, drinking and listening to the ghost. The students heard and saw nothing.

I love this story. I would not be surprised if Faulkner was messing around with this man. I find a great sense of humor in Faulkner not only in his works but in his life amidst all the obvious gloom that others see. His writing is cathartic as I presume it was to him and his life and eccentricities an expression of a great mind and a man who knew how to tell and be a story.


message 38: by Zach (new)

Zach Irvin | 6 comments That's pretty funny. In my American lit. class my teacher talked about he was in the Royal Air Force, but never saw any action. Yet later on he made up stories about being in battle and stuff. It seems like he certainly liked to tell tall tales.


message 39: by David (new)

David (crzydjm) | 9 comments Just picked up As I Lay Dying at the library last weekend. Working my way through The Orchard Keeper (not enjoying it anywhere near the rest of the McCarthy I've already read), and then I'll dive into Faulkner.


message 40: by K. (new)

K. Beckner | 1 comments A Rose for Emily is my favorite William Faulkner story. I read it years ago in college and haven't forgotten it. I'd say William Faulkner has a big influence over my own writing style.


message 41: by Helen (new)

Helen (helenfrances) | 7 comments K. wrote: "A Rose for Emily is my favorite William Faulkner story. I read it years ago in college and haven't forgotten it. I'd say William Faulkner has a big influence over my own writing style."

Funny this is mentioned as I read this just last night by chance. It was nothing like As I Lay Dying though, which is the book I adore Faulkner for. It was a good little story but actually it read a lot more like Capote to me, and made me think of his short stories collection, 'Other Voices, Other Rooms'.


message 42: by Karen (new)

Karen | 3 comments Nelson wrote: "Victoria wrote: "Nelson: It's so nice to see fellow Faulkner fans. I went to an all girl's school... no fans there. Our introductory book was As I Lay Dying, which I think is the best way to start ..."
If you love Faulkner and McCarthy as I do, you might also want to give Ivan Doig a try. His settings are mostly Montana, but the beauty of his language puts him right up there with the other two!


message 43: by Helen (new)

Helen (helenfrances) | 7 comments Thanks Karen, I agree with your thoughts on AILD. I'm really interested to know if you have a recommendation of where best to start with Ivan Doig, please? Not the first time I've heard his name in these circles so reading it again has piqued my interest. 'The Whistling Season', 'The Bartender's Tale', 'This House of Sky: Landscapes of a Western Mind', 'English Creek', 'Work Song', 'Sweet Thunder'... Where to start?! :)


message 44: by Karen (new)

Karen | 3 comments Helen wrote: "Thanks Karen, I agree with your thoughts on AILD. I'm really interested to know if you have a recommendation of where best to start with Ivan Doig, please? Not the first time I've heard his name in..."

I think you should begin with "English Creek." It sets the foundation for several of his later books and characters reappear off and on throughout his writing, much like Faulkner. Then "Dancing at the Rascal Fair," which is my personal favorite so far.


message 45: by Helen (new)

Helen (helenfrances) | 7 comments Thanks a lot, Karen, I will definitely look into these.


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