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Nominations > Now accepting nominations for our July, 2019, Group Reads

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message 1: by Lawyer, "Lawyer Stevens" (new)

Lawyer (goodreadscommm_sullivan) | 2563 comments Mod
I am now accepting nominations for our July Group reads. What would you like to read as we enter the long hot summer?


message 2: by Richard (new)

Richard Derus (Oldfan) | 46 comments For post-1980, I'll nominate again a book I really feel the group would enjoy, and which has such resonance with today's issues that, honest, even if it doesn't win I hope y'all'll go and get it. Kindle edition is $4.95 and used paperbacks are a whopping $3.50!
Haylow by Gray Stewart.
Description:
Travis Hemperly is a white southerner who has never been the minority in any room he's ever entered. He has also just joined the history faculty at a historically black college in Atlanta. Off campus, he rekindles a relationship with an old flame, and life looks bright—until he begins to suspect that a family member witnessed a lynching as a child. Complicating matters, his father is now a talk show host for WCTR—Confederate Talk Radio—whose listeners debate whether slavery was wrong. In order to remain in his new position, Travis will have to come to terms with some history outside of his area of specialization—that of his family and that of the South.


message 3: by Tina (last edited May 17, 2019 03:17PM) (new)

Tina  | 438 comments Pre-Internet:
Love in the Ruins by Walker Percy 1971

Dr. Tom More has created a miraculous instrument -- the Ontological Lapsometer, a kind of stethoscope of the human spirit. With it, he plans to cure mankind's spiritual flu. Though scorned by the experts, Tom embarks on an outrageous odyssey to prove himself. Attempting to save the world from destruction, Tom ultimately begins to understand what he can never really know -- the quality and caprices of life and the uncontrollable vagaries of time and chance


message 4: by Tina (new)

Tina  | 438 comments Post 1980:

Stormy Weather by Paulette Jiles

From Paulette Jiles, author of the critically acclaimed New York Times bestsellers Enemy Women and Stormy Weather, comes a stirring work of fiction set on the untamed Texas frontier in the aftermath of the Civil War. One of only twelve books longlisted for the 2009 Scotiabank Giller Prize—one of Canada’s most prestigious literary awards—The Color of Lightning is a beautifully rendered and unforgettable re-examination of one of the darkest periods in U.S. history.


message 5: by Lawyer, "Lawyer Stevens" (new)

Lawyer (goodreadscommm_sullivan) | 2563 comments Mod
Richard wrote: "For post-1980, I'll nominate again a book I really feel the group would enjoy, and which has such resonance with today's issues that, honest, even if it doesn't win I hope y'all'll go and get it. K..."

Thanks, Richard. Sounds very interesting. Nominated Post-1980.


message 6: by Lawyer, "Lawyer Stevens" (new)

Lawyer (goodreadscommm_sullivan) | 2563 comments Mod
Tina wrote: "Post 1980:

Stormy Weather by Paulette Jiles

From Paulette Jiles, author of the critically acclaimed New York Times bestsellers Enemy Women and Stormy Weather, comes a stirring work..."


Tina wrote: "Pre-Internet:
Love in the Ruins by Walker Percy 1971

Dr. Tom More has created a miraculous instrument -- the Ontological Lapsometer, a kind of stethoscope of the human spirit. With it..."


Good going, Tina. Love in the Ruins byWalker Percy and Stormy Weather byPaulette Jiles are both nominated in their respective categories.


message 7: by Judi (new)

Judi | 192 comments For Pre 1980 I would like to nominate Pudd'nhead Wilson by Mark Twain
For my Post 1980 nomination I have a question before I submit a nomination. Is Florida considered a Southern State by On The Southern Literary Trail????


message 8: by Diane, "Miss Scarlett" (new)

Diane Barnes | 2893 comments Mod
Most definitely, Judi.


message 9: by Judi (new)

Judi | 192 comments Thanks Diane! Oh boy!
For Post 1980 I would like to nominate Tourist Season by Carl Hiassen.


message 10: by Lawyer, "Lawyer Stevens" (new)

Lawyer (goodreadscommm_sullivan) | 2563 comments Mod
Judi wrote: "For Pre 1980 I would like to nominate Pudd'nhead Wilson by Mark Twain
For my Post 1980 nomination I have a question before I submit a nomination. Is Florida considered a Southern State by On The So..."


Yep. Florida is a Southern state. And Tourist Season byCarl Hiaasen


message 11: by Lawyer, "Lawyer Stevens" (new)

Lawyer (goodreadscommm_sullivan) | 2563 comments Mod
Yep, Florida is a Southern state. And Tourist Season by Carl Hiaasen is nominated Post 1980.

Pudd'nhead Wilson by Mark Twain is nominated Pre-1980.Wilson
Thanks, Judi!


message 12: by Diane, "Miss Scarlett" (new)

Diane Barnes | 2893 comments Mod
Not quite sure why nominations are so slow coming in, but in an attempt to rev it up, here are a couple:

A Fable, by William Faulkner, for pre.

Under Magnolia: A Southern Memoir, by Frances Mayes, for post.


message 13: by Beverly (new)

Beverly | 178 comments I would like to nominate I Am One of You Forever by Fred Chappell for Post-1980


message 14: by Warren (new)

Warren | 38 comments Here are my nominations:

Post-1980:
Cemetery Road by Greg Iles

Pre-1980:
A Hell of a Woman by Jim Thompson


message 15: by Tom, "Big Daddy" (new)

Tom Mathews | 1809 comments Mod
We now have six nominations for the Post-1980 group so that group is now closed to new nominations. There is still room for two more Pre-1980 nominations. I would like to nominate Cape Fear as one of those.


message 16: by Richard (new)

Richard Derus (Oldfan) | 46 comments I'll try again to interest folks in The Miller of Old Church, a 1911 novel by amazingly advanced woman Ellen Glasgow. She was simply uninterested in conventional mores. She wrote, starting in the 1910s, a series of novels about women who were Good Wives yet still ruled their roosts. Submit to an incompetent man? Faugh! Never! And, radically and shockingly for the era, the powerful women succeeded and didn't Pay A Price for their strength overmatching A Man's.

This novel is free on Kindle/Nook via their websites or Project Gutenberg. and a whopping $10 in a brand new paperback via Buns and Nubile. Used copies of uncollectible editions are as little as $7 via Ammy.


message 17: by Lawyer, "Lawyer Stevens" (new)

Lawyer (goodreadscommm_sullivan) | 2563 comments Mod
Diane wrote: "Not quite sure why nominations are so slow coming in, but in an attempt to rev it up, here are a couple:

A Fable, by William Faulkner, for pre.

Under Magnolia: A Southern Memo..."</i>

Thanks, Diane. I suppose folks are just busy. I appreciate your putting some kindling to the fire.

[book:A Fable
by William Faulkner is nominated Pre-1980. It is a marked departure from the Yoknapatawpha County novels, set during World War One on the Western Front. The central plot deals with a mutiny by French Troops who refused to continue to fight and the ensuing consequences. The novel took both the Pulitzer and the National Book Award. Faulkner had a great interest in the war. He had joined the Canadian Royal Air Force and received flight training. However, Faulkner never saw combat because the war ended too early for him to fight. His first novel, Soldiers' Pay dealt with the life of an American soldier following his return from the war. Flags in the Dust featured two brothers, both pilots. One brother comes home, the other didn't survive. The war influences much of the novel. Faulkner was consumed in writing A Fable, drafting the novel's plot/timeline on the walls of his study. You can see Faulkner's study notes when visiting his home, Rowan Oak, in Oxford, Ms. A
A
Under Magnolia: A Southern Memoir byFrances Mayes is nominated Post-1980. Born in Fitzgerald, Georgia, you may recognize this writer as the author ofUnder the Tuscan Sun.



message 18: by Lawyer, "Lawyer Stevens" (last edited May 20, 2019 10:47AM) (new)

Lawyer (goodreadscommm_sullivan) | 2563 comments Mod
Beverly wrote: "I would like to nominate I Am One of You Forever by Fred Chappell for Post-1980".

Thank you, Beverly! I Am One of You Forever byFred Chappell is nominated Post-1980.

Chappell is a beloved writer and poet in North Carolina. He worked as an English Professor for forty years. He was NC's Poet Laureate from 1997 to 2002.

From the gr summary:

Wonderfully funny and also deeply touching, I Am One of You Forever is the story of a young boy's coming of age. Set in the hills and hollows of western North Carolina in the years around World War II, it tells of ten-year-old Jess and his family -- father, mother, grandmother, foster brother, and an odd assortment of other relatives -- who usher Jess into the adult world, with all its attendant joys and sorrows, knowledge and mystery.
Jess's father is feisty, restless, and fun-loving. His mother is straitlaced and serious but accepts with grace and good humor the antics of the men of the family, a trait she learned from her own mother. Johnson Gibbs is the orphaned teenager who comes to live with them on their mountain farm. Life on the laurel-covered mountain is isolated and at times difficult, but for Jess it is made rich and remarkable through his relationship with his father and, especially, Johnson Gibbs.
Visiting the farm from time to time is a gallery of eccentric relatives who are surely among the most memorable creations in recent fiction. Uncle Luden is a womanizer who left the mountains years ago for a job in California that "paid actual cash money." Uncle Gurton has a spooky way of appearing and disappearing without ever seeming to enter or exit, but it is his flowing beard, which he has apparently never trimmed and which he keeps tucked inside his overalls, that is of most fascination to Jess.
Uncle Zeno is a storyteller. With the words "That puts me in mind of..." everyone around knows that he is about to launch into another of his endless tales. Uncle Runkin, who always brings his handmade coffin to sleep in whenever he visits, spends his time carving intricate designs into the coffin and trying to find just the right epitaph for his tombstone. Aunt Samantha Barefoot stops by for a brief spell, too. A country singer and cousin to Jess's grandmother, she is a woman of uncensored speech (Jess learns a lot from her) and honest emotions. Chappell tells the story of all of these characters in a series of chapters that range from fantasy and near farce to pathos. As notable for its lyrical descriptions of the rural settings as for its finely honed vernacular dialogue, I Am One of You Forever shows us a world full of wit and wisdom and the sadness at the heart of things. As one would expect from a poet like Fred Chappell, every line offers its own pleasures and satisfactions.


message 19: by Perry (new)

Perry (Atty_tude) | 8 comments your invitation to nominations, mentioning "the long hot summer," reminded me of the 1958 film, The Long, Hot Summer, starring Newman, Woodward and Orson Welles, which was based largely on Faulkner's The Hamlet (as well as on two of his shorter works).

The novel was much, much better than the movie. I would like to nominate it for pre1980, please.


message 20: by Lawyer, "Lawyer Stevens" (last edited May 20, 2019 11:36AM) (new)

Lawyer (goodreadscommm_sullivan) | 2563 comments Mod
Warren wrote: "Here are my nominations:

Post-1980:
Cemetery Road by Greg Iles

Pre-1980:
A Hell of a Woman by Jim Thompson"


Thank you Warren. Cemetery Road by Greg Iles is nominated Post-1980.Road

However, what are your thoughts on what makes One Helluva Woman Southern lit. I've read a good bit of Thompson's crime fiction but haven't read this one. I've read several reviews but haven't found anything that places the setting in the South. Holding off on this one for now.


message 21: by Warren (new)

Warren | 38 comments All of the Thompson books I’ve read so far have been set in Oklahoma or Texas so I presumed this one would be too, but maybe someone who’s read it can confirm.


message 22: by Lawyer, "Lawyer Stevens" (new)

Lawyer (goodreadscommm_sullivan) | 2563 comments Mod
Tom wrote: "We now have six nominations for the Post-1980 group so that group is now closed to new nominations. There is still room for two more Pre-1980 nominations. I would like to nominate Cape Fear byJohn D. MacDonald is nominated Pre-1980. The novel was originally published as "The Executioners" in 1957. It has been filmed twice as "Cape Fear."


message 23: by Lawyer, "Lawyer Stevens" (new)

Lawyer (goodreadscommm_sullivan) | 2563 comments Mod
Richard wrote: "I'll try again to interest folks in The Miller of Old Church, a 1911 novel by amazingly advanced woman Ellen Glasgow. She was simply uninterested in conventional mor..."Gear
Gear
Thanks, Richard! The Miller of Old Church by Ellen Glasgow is nominated Pre-1980.


message 24: by Lawyer, "Lawyer Stevens" (last edited May 20, 2019 12:05PM) (new)

Lawyer (goodreadscommm_sullivan) | 2563 comments Mod
Perry wrote: "your invitation to nominations, mentioning "the long hot summer," reminded me of the 1958 film, The Long, Hot Summer, starring Newman, Woodward and Orson Welles, which was based largely on Faulkner..."

Good on you, Perry! I had that film in mind when I called for nominations. Orson Welles' dialogue was a tortuous mix of mutters and mumblings to create his interpretation of a Southern accent. GRIN Hosever, we have now received our six nominations in each category. I'd welcome your nomination next month.


message 25: by Tom, "Big Daddy" (new)

Tom Mathews | 1809 comments Mod
I will get the polls out this evening unless Lawyer is already working on them.


message 26: by Warren (new)

Warren | 38 comments BTW , I did some more research on "A Hell of a Woman" and apparently the book is actually set in Lincoln, Nebraska. Oops. You can remove that one from the pre-1980 poll options, sorry!


message 27: by Tom, "Big Daddy" (new)

Tom Mathews | 1809 comments Mod
You're too late, Warren! No biggie. I can't imaging any situation where suggesting a Jim Thompson novel could be a bad thing. The Polls are up and running and there are some hard choices to be made. Please vote below for your choice for the July selections.

For the Pre-1980 poll, Vote here!

For the Post-1980 poll, Vote here!

I believe that Lynn will be selecting the Moderators' Choice selection for July. Stay tuned.


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