The Baseball Book Club discussion

note: This topic has been closed to new comments.
27 views
Current Books & Discussions > Discussion of "Ten Innings at Wrigley"

Comments Showing 1-38 of 38 (38 new)    post a comment »
dateDown arrow    newest »

message 2: by Lance (new)

Lance (sportsbookguy) | 12568 comments Mod
Kevin Cook, the author of "Ten Innings at Wrigley", has informed me that he will be happy to answer any questions that members may have about the book. Thank you, Kevin.


message 3: by Harold (new)

Harold Kasselman | 17545 comments I think he wrote Electric October too


message 4: by Brina (new)

Brina | 8117 comments Mod
He did and he is excited to be here to answered questions.


message 5: by Harold (new)

Harold Kasselman | 17545 comments That's great because I loved Electric October.


message 6: by Michael Linn (new)

Michael Linn | 10843 comments Caught some ugly in the Mets blowout of the Phils, the Mets responded to having a couple of their "boys" buzzed by returning the "favor" to Mr. Hoskins. Look out today for a continuation.
Mike Linn
I can`t believe how far the Red Sox seem to have fallen.
Btrina`s Cubs looked determined last night.
Anyone think the standings would remotely look like this 1 month into the season ? ( Lance did ) I love it.


message 7: by Lance (new)

Lance (sportsbookguy) | 12568 comments Mod
Just to get this going, pasting my review from the ARC I posted earlier.

On May 17, 1979, the Chicago Cubs and the Philadelphia Phillies played one of the biggest slugfests in the history of the game, with the Phillies winning the game 23-22 in ten innings. The two teams combined for thirteen runs in the first inning (Phillies 7, Cubs 6) and the Cubs came back from a 12 run deficit (21-9) only to lose the game in extra innings. This game, along with some history and follow-up stories on some of the players in that game, is shared in this very entertaining book by Kevin Cook.

The actual events of the game make up the bulk of the book, but Cook sandwiches the inning-by-inning description by first giving the reader a background history check on the two teams involved and finishes the book with stories about key players such as the Cubs’ Dave Kingman (who homered three times in the game) and Donnie Moore and the Phillies’ Bob Boone and Tug McGraw.

These players are featured in the post-game writing but what is truly impressive about this book is that EVERY player who made an appearance in this game gets his just due. Of course, there is more coverage of players who had a great game hitting (or had a terrible game on the mound) but no matter what contribution that player made to the historic game, Cook made sure to mention him. The reader will also get a true feeling of what it was like to see a game at Wrigley at that time – all day games, plenty of empty seats as Wrigley was less than half full on that Thursday afternoon, people waiting in the street on Waveland Avenue for home runs, fans camped on the rooftops - it’s all there and is a terrific trip back in time for readers who remember when only day games were played at Wrigley.

While the brief histories of the teams before the chapters on the game are enjoyable to read, the stories on some of the players following the game are even better. What is really interesting is how intertwined the stories of that game became and Cook’s reference to them. For example, it was interesting to read about how two Cubs teammates in that game, Donnie Moore and Bill Buckner, ended up crossing paths on different teams in the 1986 American League Championship Series. Most baseball fans know what happened to both men after that season, so I won’t rehash it here, but Cook’s prose will leave the reader emotionally spent when reading about them, especially Moore.

Any reader who is a fan of baseball of that era, a Cubs fan or a Phillies fan, this book must be added to his or her library. With rich detail and a knack for easy-to-read prose, Kevin Cook has written another excellent baseball book. It is certainly one that will stay in my library and will be pulled out when I want to remember the first Cubs game I saw on that relatively new industry called cable television.


message 8: by Harold (new)

Harold Kasselman | 17545 comments Michael Linn wrote: "Caught some ugly in the Mets blowout of the Phils, the Mets responded to having a couple of their "boys" buzzed by returning the "favor" to Mr. Hoskins. Look out today for a continuation.
Mike Linn..."
Quintana looked great-like the guy that was supposed to be


message 9: by Harold (new)

Harold Kasselman | 17545 comments Lance wrote: "Just to get this going, pasting my review from the ARC I posted earlier.

On May 17, 1979, the Chicago Cubs and the Philadelphia Phillies played one of the biggest slugfests in the history of the g..."

THank you Lance. I read your original book review


message 10: by Brina (new)

Brina | 8117 comments Mod
Here is my review. I read back in February when I got an ARC from Kevin.
https://www.goodreads.com/review/show...


message 11: by Harold (new)

Harold Kasselman | 17545 comments Some memories stay etched in your mind forever. The only memory I have of the game was listening to it outside while I washed and polished my car. I went from ecstatic to oy vey during that game. It was something else. I'm looking forward to reading the book.


message 12: by Lance (new)

Lance (sportsbookguy) | 12568 comments Mod
My memory of the game was coming home from school (my junior year in HS) and my mom and 1 month old sister had the game on because it was the first day we got Cable TV in our suburb. What a way to break in cable TV! Of course, I joined them and just was flabbergasted.


message 13: by Brina (new)

Brina | 8117 comments Mod
The Cubs Unical 76 gas station gave out free 8x11 posters with a fill up in 1984 and one depicted when the wind blew out at wrigley featuring all high scoring games. I still have it with all my cubs stuff but otherwise because I was born the year this game took place, I have only watched parts of it on YouTube.


message 14: by Gerard (new)

Gerard (gkwilecki) I just started reading the book, since today is the release day. Why did Kingman and Buckner not like each other?


message 15: by Harold (new)

Harold Kasselman | 17545 comments I didn't read it so I'm interested too.


message 16: by Harold (last edited May 24, 2019 06:00AM) (new)

Harold Kasselman | 17545 comments I just started the book. The first thing that struck me is that on the line up pages for the two teams, there were four Cubs players that would play for the Phillies: Ivan De Jesus, Ted Seizmore, Barry Foote,and someone else. I found that interesting. It was Jerry Martin.


message 17: by Brina (new)

Brina | 8117 comments Mod
That worked out well- Cubs got a guy named Sandberg in return for the above mentioned players, or at least some of them.


message 18: by Harold (new)

Harold Kasselman | 17545 comments Yeah-worst trade in Phillies history. A close tie between trading Fergie Jenkins for Bob Buhl and Larry Jenkins


message 19: by Mike (new)

Mike (mike9) | 6338 comments Catcher Dave Rader came over in the Trillo deal too.


message 20: by Mike (new)

Mike (mike9) | 6338 comments I think the Jenkins deal was worse because it potentially cost the Phillies a couple post season appearances.


message 21: by [deleted user] (new)

Mike wrote: "I think the Jenkins deal was worse because it potentially cost the Phillies a couple post season appearances."

But in the Phillies defense, Fergie was young and no one could know what he would do when Leo stuck him in a rotation and gave him the ball 40 times a year. Larry Jackson was a quality pitcher who was only a year or so removed from winning 23 games and he gave the Phils 3 very good years. Buhl was probably done and just a thrown in. The main problem for the Phils was Jackson's age.


message 22: by Mike (new)

Mike (mike9) | 6338 comments Mauch stuck him in the pen and didn’t give him a chance. Mauch liked veterans.


message 23: by Harold (new)

Harold Kasselman | 17545 comments I am still very early in the book-no time to get into it, but one thing occurred to me. Kevin Cook briefly alludes to the 1932 Babe Ruth "call of the homer" in the Cubs/Yankee series. He says he was that Ruth pointed at Charlie Root the Cubs pitcher saying on the next pitch he was going to take Root's head off with the hit. (page 16). I have read numerous accounts and seen documentaries and that's not what I recall. Allegedly he was pointing and saying, "that there's still one more strike or that he was motioning toward the Cubs dugout saying the same thing. Anyone recall that?


message 24: by Lance (new)

Lance (sportsbookguy) | 12568 comments Mod
I had not heard that Ruth was going to take Root's head off until reading it in this book. I had heard the same other two possibilities- that Ruth was saying one more strike or talking to the Cubs dugout


message 25: by Harold (new)

Harold Kasselman | 17545 comments Okay , thanks Lance. And the author offers no evidence to support it. Maybe we can ask him.


message 26: by Harold (last edited May 25, 2019 01:01PM) (new)

Harold Kasselman | 17545 comments How about the 1969 Cubs had Holtzman, Jenkins, and Bill Hands who threw 53 complete games that year. In 2018 there were 43 for all pitchers in baseball. It shows you baseball has changed so much.
And Robin Roberts pitching for the third time in 5 days in and going 10 innings to clinch the pennant against the Dodgers on the last day of the season!


message 27: by Harold (new)

Harold Kasselman | 17545 comments One minor quibble with Mr Cook again. He says that Phillies HOFer Ed Delhanty drowned in upstate NY after a drunken fall from a train he departed. I read Mike Sowell's 1903 book about Delhanty and it was never conclusively proven that accidental drowning was the cause of death. There were theories, with circumstantial evidence that it was a suicide. There was even conjecture and a plausible theory of murder.


message 28: by Harold (new)

Harold Kasselman | 17545 comments 1.I learned that Gary Maddox grew a full beard to hide blisters he sustained from a chemical agent, likely Agent Orange, during Vietnam. 2. I didn't realize Bill Buckner had bad legs even as early as 1979. Imagine the moxie of him telling pitchers to always cover first base for him if he got a grounder near first? That makes John MCNamara's use of him in game 6 of the 1986 World Series with the game on the line even more egregious.
3. "You gotta love Tug McGraw." Loved his line. "I spent 90% of all my money on booze and women. The other 10% I wasted.


message 29: by Harold (new)

Harold Kasselman | 17545 comments Also this stat that I found interesting. With a drawn in infield, you can expect to add 83 points to the batter's batting average.


message 30: by Harold (new)

Harold Kasselman | 17545 comments I had always felt sorry for Donnie Moore after he took the loss in the 86 playoff game between the Angels and Red Sox. After reading this book, I no longer feel that way. I had never known that he attempted to murder his wife and then shot himself in front of his two kids. How selfishly evil.
I also wonder, whether there was any connection between his dementia and when Buckner sustained a bad concussion when he after colliding with B.J. Surhoff in 1990. In those days there was no protocol and he played that game and then the next day.


message 31: by Brina (new)

Brina | 8117 comments Mod
I don’t know if there’s a connection but an example I have is- my grandma on my mom’s side had no known dementia in her family. At age 90 she was slowing down but had a sharp memory until one time she hit her head in the shower. Most people at that age would die but thanks to her good genes, she survived for 4 1/2 more years with memory going down the tubes. Even if they never prove the exact link between concussions/CTE/ dementia, we have enough concrete cases to think the worse of it. Buckner just gets me sad.


message 32: by Harold (new)

Harold Kasselman | 17545 comments Yes me too Brina. Too young for that to happen.


message 33: by [deleted user] (last edited May 27, 2019 05:24PM) (new)

The reports said Buckner had Lewy Body Dementia, which is a distinctly separate form from Alzheimer's.

Lewy Bodies are accumulations of an abnormal protein (Tau) that are seen in three diseases: Lewy Body Dementia, a form of Parkinson's associated with dementia (most Parkinson's patients never get dementia) and Chronic Traumatic Encephalopathy, which is what the big deal is about in the NFL now.

I'm not sure there is a good way to distinguish Lewy Body Dementia from CTE right now, but certainly alot of people get LBD who never had known concussions. Also, CTE is by definition the result of repeated concussions. So I would say that one concussion by Buckner likely did not do the trick.

Also, while many aging baseball players get forms of dementia, Jim Bouton comes to mind and I talked to Jim Brosnan a few years before he passed away and he was certainly sketchy on memories and it was reported later that he had mild dementia, but I have never seen a higher incidence of dementia reported in baseball players than the rest of the population.


message 34: by Harold (new)

Harold Kasselman | 17545 comments You say many players get dementia during aging, but is there a higher % among ball players than the general population? I wonder why that is? I recall that Sparky Anderson did too.


message 35: by Mike (new)

Mike (mike9) | 6338 comments I’m guessing the percentage is the same as the general population. It’s sometimes seems like more because celebrities issues are often made public.


message 36: by [deleted user] (new)

Mike wrote: "I’m guessing the percentage is the same as the general population. It’s sometimes seems like more because celebrities issues are often made public."

Boxers and football players definitely have a proven higher incidence (and that's what the big stink is right now). I've never seen a higher incidence reported for baseball, basketball, tennis or golf players.

Although baseball players do get concussions, especially the old-timers who didn't wear batting helmets and catchers getting run over before the new rules, they don't get the constant head-versus-head trauma for years like football guys do and I think that makes all the difference.

This is a routine conversation whenever I get together with my oldest son. He's a sports specialist surgeon and played football through college--and loved it. When I ask him if he would consider not playing football, knowing what he knows now, he looks at me like he can't even fathom the question.


message 37: by Mike (new)

Mike (mike9) | 6338 comments Sorry Doug, I was only talking baseball players.


message 38: by Lance (new)

Lance (sportsbookguy) | 12568 comments Mod
Being a big hockey fan, I wonder about their percentage rates of concussions and CTE as well given the amount of hits they take, both in body collisions and in collisions with the boards/plexiglass


back to top
This topic has been frozen by the moderator. No new comments can be posted.