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Henry Wadsworth Longfellow
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message 1: by Jordan (new)

Jordan St. Stier | 71 comments Mod
This is about Mr. Longfellow's Poetic Works.


message 2: by Jordan (new)

Jordan St. Stier | 71 comments Mod
Humorous Longfellow Poem:

THERE was a little girl,
And she had a little curl
Right in the middle of her forehead.
When she was good
She was very, very good,
And when she was bad she was horrid.

One day she went upstairs,
When her parents, unawares,
In the kitchen were occupied with meals,
And she stood upon her head
In her little trundle-bed,
And then began hooraying with her heels.

Her mother heard the noise,
And she thought it was the boys
A-playing at a combat in the attic
But when she climbed the stair,
And found Jemima there,
She took and she did spank her most emphatic.


message 3: by Jordan (new)

Jordan St. Stier | 71 comments Mod
The Children's Hour

Between the dark and the daylight,
When the night is beginning to lower,
Comes a pause in the day's occupations,
That is known as the Children's Hour.

I hear in the chamber above me
The patter of little feet,
The sound of a door that is opened,
And voices soft and sweet.

From my study I see in the lamplight,
Descending the broad hall stair,
Grave Alice, and laughing Allegra,
And Edith with golden hair.

A whisper, and then a silence:
Yet I know by their merry eyes
They are plotting and planning together
To take me by surprise.

A sudden rush from the stairway,
A sudden raid from the hall!
By three doors left unguarded
They enter my castle wall!

They climb up into my turret
O'er the arms and back of my chair;
If I try to escape, they surround me;
They seem to be everywhere.

They almost devour me with kisses,
Their arms about me entwine,
Till I think of the Bishop of Bingen
In his Mouse-Tower on the Rhine!

Do you think, O blue-eyed banditti,
Because you have scaled the wall,
Such an old mustache as I am
Is not a match for you all!

I have you fast in my fortress,
And will not let you depart,
But put you down into the dungeon
In the round-tower of my heart.

And there will I keep you forever,
Yes, forever and a day,
Till the walls shall crumble to ruin,
And moulder in dust away!


message 4: by Jordan (new)

Jordan St. Stier | 71 comments Mod
Commentary:
-Alice, Allegra, and Edith are his youngest daughters
-Bishop of Bingen:
Hatto II was Archbishop of Mainz and Bishop of Bingen (d. 970) collected tolls on the Rhine from a little tower on an island there. The German for toll is Maut, which was corrupted to Maus, and become the Mauseturm (Mouse Tower). From there comes the story of Hatto I (his predecessor), a cruel and unliked leader who starved his people and employed soldiers to shoot from the roof of 'his' tower to ward away angry peasant. After being sufficiently annoyed with the peasants, he locked them in a barn with the premise of getting food and set the barn on fire, saying 'Here the Mice Squeak'. A crowd of mice then chased him to his island and ate him to death.

-Here Longfellow is comparing being smothered by hugs to being eaten by rats (strange comparison for his daughters...)
-Banditti: Outlaws (from the Italian)
-Moulder: to decay


message 5: by Jordan (new)

Jordan St. Stier | 71 comments Mod
The Landlord's Tale. Paul Revere's Ride

Listen, my children, and you shall hear
Of the midnight ride of Paul Revere,
On the eighteenth of April, in Seventy-five;
Hardly a man is now alive
Who remembers that famous day and year.

He said to his friend, "If the British march
By land or sea from the town to-night,
Hang a lantern aloft in the belfry arch
Of the North Church tower as a signal light,—
One, if by land, and two, if by sea;
And I on the opposite shore will be,
Ready to ride and spread the alarm
Through every Middlesex village and farm,
For the country folk to be up and to arm."
Then he said, "Good night!" and with muffled oar
Silently rowed to the Charlestown shore,
Just as the moon rose over the bay,
Where swinging wide at her moorings lay
The Somerset, British man-of-war;
A phantom ship, with each mast and spar
Across the moon like a prison bar,
And a huge black hulk, that was magnified
By its own reflection in the tide.

Meanwhile, his friend, through alley and street,
Wanders and watches with eager ears,
Till in the silence around him he hears
The muster of men at the barrack door,
The sound of arms, and the tramp of feet,
And the measured tread of the grenadiers,
Marching down to their boats on the shore.

Then he climbed the tower of the Old North Church,
By the wooden stairs, with stealthy tread,
To the belfry-chamber overhead,
And startled the pigeons from their perch
On the sombre rafters, that round him made
Masses and moving shapes of shade, —
By the trembling ladder, steep and tall,
To the highest window in the wall,
Where he paused to listen and look down
A moment on the roofs of the town,
And the moonlight flowing over all.
Beneath, in the churchyard, lay the dead,
In their night-encampment on the hill,
Wrapped in silence so deep and still
That he could hear, like a sentinel's tread,
The watchful night-wind, as it went
Creeping along from tent to tent,
And seeming to whisper, "All is well!"
A moment only he feels the spell
Of the place and the hour, and the secret dread
Of the lonely belfry and the dead;
For suddenly all his thoughts are bent
On a shadowy something far away,
Where the river widens to meet the bay, —
A line of black that bends and floats
On the rising tide, like a bridge of boats.

Meanwhile, impatient to mount and ride,
Booted and spurred, with a heavy stride
On the opposite shore walked Paul Revere.
Now he patted his horse's side,
Now gazed at the landscape far and near,
Then, impetuous, stamped the earth,
And turned and tightened his saddle girth;
But mostly he watched with eager search
The belfry-tower of the Old North Church,
As it rose above the graves on the hill,
Lonely and spectral and sombre and still.
And lo! as he looks, on the belfry's height
A glimmer, and then a gleam of light!
He springs to the saddle, the bridle he turns,
But lingers and gazes, till full on his sight
A second lamp in the belfry burns!
A hurry of hoofs in a village street,
A shape in the moonlight, a bulk in the dark,
And beneath, from the pebbles, in passing, a spark
Struck out by a steed flying fearless and fleet:
That was all! And yet, through the gloom and the light,
The fate of a nation was riding that night;
And the spark struck out by that steed, in his flight,
Kindled the land into flame with its heat.
He has left the village and mounted the steep,
And beneath him, tranquil and broad and deep,
Is the Mystic, meeting the ocean tides;
And under the alders, that skirt its edge,
Now soft on the sand, now loud on the ledge,
Is heard the tramp of his steed as he rides.

It was twelve by the village clock,
When he crossed the bridge into Medford town.
He heard the crowing of the cock,
And the barking of the farmer's dog,
And felt the damp of the river fog,
That rises after the sun goes down.

It was one by the village clock,
When he galloped into Lexington.
He saw the gilded weathercock
Swim in the moonlight as he passed,
And the meeting-house windows, blank and bare,
Gaze at him with a spectral glare,
As if they already stood aghast
At the bloody work they would look upon.

It was two by the village clock,
When he came to the bridge in Concord town.
He heard the bleating of the flock,
And the twitter of birds among the trees,
And felt the breath of the morning breeze
Blowing over the meadows brown.
And one was safe and asleep in his bed
Who at the bridge would be first to fall,
Who that day would be lying dead,
Pierced by a British musket-ball.

You know the rest. In the books you have read,
How the British Regulars fired and fled, —
How the farmers gave them ball for ball,
From behind each fence and farm-yard wall,
Chasing the red-coats down the lane,
Then crossing the fields to emerge again
Under the trees at the turn of the road,
And only pausing to fire and load.

So through the night rode Paul Revere;
And so through the night went his cry of alarm
To every Middlesex village and farm, —
A cry of defiance and not of fear,
A voice in the darkness, a knock at the door,
And a word that shall echo forevermore!
For, borne on the night-wind of the Past,
Through all our history, to the last,
In the hour of darkness and peril and need,
The people will waken and listen to hear
The hurrying hoof-beats of that steed,
And the midnight message of Paul Revere.


message 6: by Jordan (new)

Jordan St. Stier | 71 comments Mod
Notes
4/18/75- Paul Revere and two (then forty) companions: William Dawes and Samuel Prescott rode through Middlesex County, with Revere shouting 'The Regulars are coming out!' Warns Hancock and S. Adams, alerting them of their impending arrest, they flee.
The three are detained by the regulars, Prescott jumps horse over wall, continues to Concord, Dawes rides off, but falls and is not able to continue. Revere detained at gunpoint, has horse confiscated, meets Hancock and Adams at hiding place, goes home to Boston again.
-Somerset: HMS Somerset (1748), 70-gun man-o-war, involved in Fr. and Ind. War, moored in Boston Harbor, wrecked in 1778 off Cape Cod. Involved in Bunker Hill.
-The Somerset would shoot at any person rowing across the Mystic after a certain time (curfew). Revere somehow was undetected and made it across. Marker at Landing Site.
-Robert Newman was the Sexton of Old North Church, responsible for hanging lanterns. Lantern code is original.
-Lex. and Con. 'musket ball', 1st battle of Rev. War.


message 7: by Jordan (new)

Jordan St. Stier | 71 comments Mod
Hymn to the Night

Aspasie, trillistos.

I heard the trailing garments of the Night
Sweep through her marble halls!
I saw her sable skirts all fringed with light
From the celestial walls!

I felt her presence, by its spell of might,
Stoop o'er me from above;
The calm, majestic presence of the Night,
As of the one I love.

I heard the sounds of sorrow and delight,
The manifold, soft chimes,
That fill the haunted chambers of the Night,
Like some old poet's rhymes.

From the cool cisterns of the midnight air
My spirit drank repose;
The fountain of perpetual peace flows there, —
From those deep cisterns flows.

O holy Night! from thee I learn to bear
What man has borne before!
Thou layest thy finger on the lips of Care,
And they complain no more.

Peace! Peace! Orestes-like I breathe this prayer!
Descend with broad-winged flight,
The welcome, the thrice-prayed for, the most fair,
The best-beloved Night!


message 8: by Jordan (new)

Jordan St. Stier | 71 comments Mod
Notes:
Epigraph: From Book 8 Line 488 of the Iliad
'Thrice-prayed-for came the darkness of night.'
-To Nyx, Greek goddess of Night
-Orestes: Son of Agamemnon. Avenged his father's death, and righted his wrongs by going before Athena on the Acropolis.


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