Never ending book list discussion

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What are you reading? > April 2019 - What are you reading?

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message 1: by Claire Em (new)

Claire Em | 21 comments Mod
What's everyone reading right now? I'm currently reading the last pick for Our Shared Shelf, Emma Watson's awesome feminist book club: The Things I Would Tell You: British Muslim Women Write. If anyone else has read this, I would love to chat about it because I'm not sure how I feel about this book - some of the stories I love and other's I don't like. Let me know if you're reading anything good! (or anything not so good so I can take that into account when I choose my next book!)


message 2: by Anne (new)

Anne (protagonists_and_tea) | 6 comments I'm currently reading Bitterblue, the 3rd book in the Graceling/Seven Kingdoms trilogy by Kristin Cashore and also reading Women of the World, Rise of the Female Diplomat by Helen McCarthy. I'm listening to Shakespeare's Sonnets, because I've decided to go through all the Shakespeare I haven't read yet!


message 3: by Claire Em (new)

Claire Em | 21 comments Mod
Anne wrote: "I'm currently reading Bitterblue, the 3rd book in the Graceling/Seven Kingdoms trilogy by Kristin Cashore and also reading Women of the World, Rise of the Female Diplomat by Helen McCarthy. I'm lis..."

Wow - I also have a ton of books going at once :) I'm finishing up The Things I Would Tell You: British Muslim Women Write, Fire, The Raven King, Squire, and Lioness Rampant (although I'm almost done with the last one.... which is sad but also amazing because the series is so good).


message 4: by Claire Em (new)

Claire Em | 21 comments Mod
Anne wrote: "I'm currently reading Bitterblue, the 3rd book in the Graceling/Seven Kingdoms trilogy by Kristin Cashore and also reading Women of the World, Rise of the Female Diplomat by Helen McCarthy. I'm lis..."

Going through all the Shakespeare you haven't read is such a feat - I've always thought about it, but I just haven't gotten around to it yet....


message 5: by Katie (new)

Katie | 2 comments I'm currently reading the "7 Habits of Highly Effective People", and I have a stack of books I want to read to decide if I'm keeping them or selling/getting rid of. i will list them as I make my way through, but I'm keeping Anna Kendrick's book "Scrappy Little Nobody" and "As You Wish," and then getting rid of David Spade's book (probably giving it back to my dad)


message 6: by Katie (new)

Katie | 2 comments also still making my way through "Misreading Law Misreading Democracy." it's very interesting but I keep putting it down and forgetting about it and picking something else up


message 7: by Claire Em (new)

Claire Em | 21 comments Mod
Katie wrote: "also still making my way through "Misreading Law Misreading Democracy." it's very interesting but I keep putting it down and forgetting about it and picking something else up"

I have those books too - mine was In Praise of Difficult Women: Life Lessons from 29 Heroines Who Dared to Break the Rules (which I wouldn't recommend but was determined to finish).


message 8: by Claire Em (last edited Apr 07, 2019 03:56PM) (new)

Claire Em | 21 comments Mod
Katie wrote: "I'm currently reading the "7 Habits of Highly Effective People", and I have a stack of books I want to read to decide if I'm keeping them or selling/getting rid of. i will list them as I make my wa..."

I've heard a lot about The 7 Habits of Highly Effective Families, especially in the professional development workshops I go to at work - when you're done, post a review in the reviews folder!

Also, I LOVED Scrappy Little Nobody - her voice is so sassy like her character in Pitch Perfect. I listened to the audiobook, and Anna Kendrick actually reads it, and her level of sass and sarcasm makes me love her even more.


message 10: by Adam (new)

Adam Goldstein | 3 comments I am reading River Town by Pete Hessler. River Town is a memoir, but also a book of short stories. Each chapter has a broad theme, like "money" or the "opium wars." While the book is organized thematically, it is also organized chronologically. The book is about Hessler's time as a Peace Corps volunteer in Fuling, which is a city on the Yangtzee river in rural China. It takes place in the 1990s, when China was going through a lot of changes. It provides commentary on Political Science as well as an engaging narrative. Structuralism versus Rat. Choice, what Marxism really means, what Socialism with Chinese characteristics is, etc are all touched on. I don't love Hessler's generalizations and I find some contradictions in his metacommentary though. For example, he talks about how Marxism is theoretically contradictory, but since he is attacking the theoretical application of Marxism, his critique is fair ground for the same type of reply. He misunderstands the importance of industrialization in Marxist theory, especially as it leads to specialization and eliminating the scarcity problem in economics. While these are easy enough to critique empirically, Hessler makes a mistake of setting his own debate parameters, constricting his own ability to formulate a convincing critique of Mao, the Cultural Revolution, and Industrialization (which again, are all open to critique, but Hessler weakens his own position by limiting his critique to theory). If you're not being super-nerd Adam though, River Town is a great book and a great introduction to Fuling and the culture in those types of river towns.


message 11: by Ry (new)

Ry (walsh2013) | 2 comments This won't technically answer the question of what I'm currenlty reading. My roommate's favorite book is A Court of Mist and Fury by Sarah J. Maas. It's the second book in the Court of Thorns and Roses series. I've always avoided reading these books because I thought they were too "young" for me (my books have to have romance, and that romance usually has to involve some R rated activity) but she convinced me to give them a go. I was 100% wrong about this series. I read the first three books in a day each and now I'm afraid to read the most recent one, A Court of Frost and Starlight, because that means the world is over. I've had her copy of the book on my bookshelf for a month but I can't make myself say goodbye. Sarah has promised that more books from the same universe are coming, but I can't make myself pick the book up.


message 12: by Anne (new)

Anne (protagonists_and_tea) | 6 comments I TOTALLY UNDERSTAND! Last March, one of my all-time favorite authors released a new novel (Tempests and Slaughter) that she had been working on since I was in Mrs. Pafford's 5th-grade class! I had it preordered but I keep putting off reading it. At first, I told myself I'd wait for the end of the semester, and then I told myself I had to read some of my other TBR pile first, and then I started it but would only read a chapter at a time to make it last longer, and now, more than a year later, I have maybe 50 pages left but I can't bring my self to finish because I don't know when the next two books in the series are coming out. I've been waiting for this book for 14 YEARS OF MY LIFE-- I don't know what to do but wait for it...


message 13: by Anne (new)

Anne (protagonists_and_tea) | 6 comments Also, I'm going to reiterate my pitch for A Discovery of Witches based on your criteria... they are definitely NOT too young...


message 14: by Ry (new)

Ry (walsh2013) | 2 comments Anne wrote: "Also, I'm going to reiterate my pitch for A Discovery of Witches based on your criteria... they are definitely NOT too young..."
I have the show on my DVR, but I'll be on the "hold" list at the library for a while.


message 15: by Adam (new)

Adam Goldstein | 3 comments I am reading the book Keeper. It takes place in a fictional south american country. The main character is a newly world cup winning goalie who is being interviewed by his friend and sports journalist about his life. The goalie grew up in a jungle town filled with loggers trying to "fight" the forest. He was also terrible at soccer as a kid, he was tall, awkward, and uncoordinated. Since he had no luck on the pitch, he started to wander into the jungle, amazed by its "magic" as he puts it. He eventually stumbles upon a clearing, where there is a ghost of a former goalie from the same country. The mystery of this ghost and how this awkward kid becomes a world cup winning goalie is pretty cool. This was one of my favorite books as a kid and it's pretty neat revisiting it. I like the magical realism and return to the pasture combination, and I also like the environmentalist undertones. I also particularly like how the magic of the forest is married to the magic of the beautiful game! Kick on, readers!


message 16: by Anne (new)

Anne (protagonists_and_tea) | 6 comments Ry wrote: "Anne wrote: "Also, I'm going to reiterate my pitch for A Discovery of Witches based on your criteria... they are definitely NOT too young..."
I have the show on my DVR, but I'll be o..."


Let me know if you want to borrow my copy! Or if you want company watching the show :)


message 17: by Adam (new)

Adam Goldstein | 3 comments hello discussion group: has anyone read Notes From a Young Black Chef? Kwame's restaurant is in DC, maybe if we all read it we can go visit his restaurant?


message 18: by Anne (new)

Anne (protagonists_and_tea) | 6 comments Adam wrote: "hello discussion group: has anyone read Notes From a Young Black Chef? Kwame's restaurant is in DC, maybe if we all read it we can go visit his restaurant?"

I haven't yet, but this sounds like a great idea!


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