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message 1: by Robert (new)

Robert | 1974 comments Any opinions about Dead Ink? At the moment they are starting up an 'Advanced Readers Club' i.e a book subscription service where readers can receive their new publications a month before they hit the shelves.

As someone who lives in the EU, it may seem pricey but in the long run it works out. Anyway here's the link:

https://deadinkbooks.com/product/the-...


message 2: by Paul (new)

Paul Fulcher (fulcherkim) | 8514 comments Their 'Sealed'by Naomi Booth was shortlisted, and came 2nd in the public vote, for the Guardian's NottheBooker. See
https://www.theguardian.com/books/201...

the detailed review in the top btl comment by Mr Brown is another alias of Gumble's Yard so perhaps he can comment more.

Their new book club idea does seem a good one.


Gumble's Yard - Golden Reviewer | 5255 comments I think they are excellent. Two of their books were on the Guardian Not The Booker last year - Naomi Booth’s Sealed and the outstanding Three Dreams in The Key of G by Marc Nash. And The Unauthorised Biography of Ezra Maas by Daniel James is one of my top books of 2019.


message 4: by Paul (last edited Mar 31, 2019 02:42PM) (new)

Paul Fulcher (fulcherkim) | 8514 comments I forgot Ezra Maas - yes agree, one of the books of 2019.

I am a bit subscriptioned out this year - have over 50 books due from subscriptions - but will look at this for 2020 if it is still open.


message 5: by Ang (new)

Ang | 1685 comments Bumping this thread to the top of the section so that the discussions going on under Booker speculation and Goldsmiths speculation can continue here.


message 6: by Jason (last edited Jul 06, 2019 09:49AM) (new)

Jason (jasondenness) Dead ink do bring out some brilliant books, Sealed was great, blown away by the study circle and Ezra Maas was out of this world.


Gumble's Yard - Golden Reviewer | 5255 comments Three Dreams in the Key of G was brilliant.


message 8: by Lewis (new)

Lewis Archer Jason wrote: "Dead ink do bring out some brilliant books, Sealed was great, blown away by the study circle and Ezra Maas was out of this world."

Totally agree with you re: Ezra Maas and The Study Circle.


message 9: by Lewis (new)

Lewis Archer Gumble's Yard wrote: "Three Dreams in the Key of G was brilliant."

It's a great book and I was thrilled to see it make the Not the Booker prize last year as the wildcard. It was entirely deserved. I've seen Marc Nash read too and he's fantastic spoken word performer.


message 10: by [deleted user] (new)

Lewis wrote: "Paul wrote: "Their 'Sealed'by Naomi Booth was shortlisted, and came 2nd in the public vote, for the Guardian's NottheBooker. See
https://www.theguardian.com/books/201......"


All true, but you have to at least give them credit for having the good taste to publish James, Nash, Khan et al in the first place. They had a very good 2018 in terms of their literary output.


message 11: by Antonomasia (last edited Jul 08, 2019 03:50AM) (new)

Antonomasia | 2629 comments A reminder to any less experienced reviewers on GR, in particular with regard to The Unauthorised Biography of Ezra Maas: if you received a free promotional/review copy of a book, and/or you are a friend of the author, you should state this in your review (best at either the beginning or the end so it is clear and easy to locate the info). It is part of GR guidelines and also US FTC regulations applying to promotions on social media that people should disclose free goods they received for review purposes.

Review guidelines: https://www.goodreads.com/review/guid...


message 12: by Lewis (last edited Jul 08, 2019 07:52AM) (new)

Lewis Archer On the subject of Dead Ink, I'd also recommend the work of Sophie Hopesmith and SJ Bradley. I saw a video of a panel debate - I forget where it was recorded - with the pair, alongside other authors, reading from their work and I was very impressed. Quite different material from each other, and some of the writers discussed elsewhere in this thread - less experimental perhaps - but both read their work brilliantly and discussed their literary influences with a lot of passion and knowledge. Definitely two writers to keep an eye out for.


message 13: by [deleted user] (new)

Nice article picking out Haroun Khan's novel in Cosmopolitan magazine earlier this year for those who have yet to discover the book: https://www.cosmopolitan.com/uk/enter...


message 14: by Lewis (new)

Lewis Archer This piece by Khan, talking about the origins of his novel, is really good too: https://deadinkbooks.com/my-political...


Gumble's Yard - Golden Reviewer | 5255 comments Antonomasia wrote: "A reminder to any less experienced reviewers on GR, in particular with regard to The Unauthorised Biography of Ezra Maas: ..."

Thanks Antonomaasia for the timely reminder of these foundational principles.


message 16: by Darryl (new)

Darryl This is a couple of years old now, but for those who haven't previously read it, it is an interesting article on Dead Ink's website supposedly written by Daniel James (pre or post-disappearance - who knows?) about his favourite postmodern detectives and other influences.

https://deadinkbooks.com/post-truth-d...


message 17: by Karen Michele (new)

Karen Michele Burns (klibrary) | 182 comments Darryl wrote: "This is a couple of years old now, but for those who haven't previously read it, it is an interesting article on Dead Ink's website supposedly written by Daniel James (pre or post-disappearance - w..."

I'm about 30% into the Kindle version of Ezra Maas and I am enjoying it. I've been reading it as purely fiction, though, written in Gonzo journalism style and masterfully done. The article about "Post-Truth Detectives" is great. Once a librarian, always a librarian, I guess, but my research so far doesn't support any truth except some interesting things I have found about the author's identity. I don't want to be a spoiler to all the fun, though! I live in the US, so I haven't had any run-ins with black vans and I haven't used Twitter much since I retired, so please convince me if you can!


message 18: by Darryl (new)

Darryl Karen Michele wrote: "Darryl wrote: "This is a couple of years old now, but for those who haven't previously read it, it is an interesting article on Dead Ink's website supposedly written by Daniel James (pre or post-di..."

Oh I'm just a fan too. I don't know any more than you and wouldn't try to convince anyone of anything, although I have found all the speculation fun. I've always enjoyed books that take the story beyond the page, especially those that leave a trail of breadcrumbs for you to follow up on. Like you, I'm a fan of extra-curricular research as you can probably tell. And this has all been very cleverly done, whether it's all the author's work or not (and if it is he's clearly been working very hard). I've thoroughly enjoyed looking up some of the footnotes and discovering the extra pieces of the story - the Ezra Maas website, the Maas Foundation social media accounts, the YouTube documentary videos, there's much more out there to find too. Several strange things have genuinely happened to me before, during and after reading the book - although how much of this was my own active imagination I couldn't say!


message 19: by Karen Michele (new)

Karen Michele Burns (klibrary) | 182 comments I agree, Darryl ----- I think the whole concept of the book and media connections is brilliant! I'm really enjoying it!


message 20: by Lewis (new)

Lewis Archer Darryl wrote: "Karen Michele wrote: "Darryl wrote: "This is a couple of years old now, but for those who haven't previously read it, it is an interesting article on Dead Ink's website supposedly written by Daniel..."

Of course, none of those innovative, multimedia elements that circle the book's orbit like little satellites, would be as special if not for the novel itself. I've just read a wonderful review posted last night by a Goodreads member that focuses almost entirely on the book, its wealth of meta-literary references, and its intertextuality: https://www.goodreads.com/review/show...

As clever as all the world-building is around the novel (real or not), the book itself is the star for me. I came to it through my love of detective fiction and hardboiled noir, but it was so much more than I expected. I'm so glad to see more and more people discovering it.


message 21: by Hugh (new)

Hugh (bodachliath) | 3110 comments Mod
Lewis wrote: " I've just read a wonderful review posted last night by a Goodreads member that focuses almost entirely on the book, its wealth of meta-literary references, and its intertextuality: "
Not just "a Goodreads member". Jonathan has been a regular contributor to this group for several years. I agree that it is a very impressive review.


message 22: by Lewis (new)

Lewis Archer Hugh wrote: "Lewis wrote: " I've just read a wonderful review posted last night by a Goodreads member that focuses almost entirely on the book, its wealth of meta-literary references, and its intertextuality: "..."

I didn't mean any disrespect, quite the opposite in fact. I'm full of admiration for Jonathan's review. I think it's incredible. One of the very best reviews of the book so far.


message 23: by Darryl (new)

Darryl Interview with Marc Nash from Cult Fiction.net: https://www.cult-fiction.net/an-inter...


message 24: by Paul (new)

Paul Fulcher (fulcherkim) | 8514 comments Thanks - very interesting, including the comments on experimental fiction generally.


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