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The Rise and Fall of the Dinosaurs: A New History of a Lost World
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Book Club 2019 > March 2019 - Dinosaurs

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message 1: by Betsy, co-mod (new) - rated it 4 stars

Betsy | 1725 comments Mod
For March 2019, we will be reading The Rise and Fall of the Dinosaurs: A New History of a Lost World by Stephen Brusatte.

Please use this thread to post questions, comments, and reviews, at any time.


message 2: by Rupinder (new)

Rupinder (rupindersayal) Great!! I had bought it last year when it came out. I’m looking forward to read it!


message 3: by Betsy, co-mod (new) - rated it 4 stars

Betsy | 1725 comments Mod
I just finished this book. I really enjoyed it. It's actually pretty short and very accessible for the non-paleontologist as long as you don't let yourself become distracted by all the Latin. Here is my review.


Erica | 24 comments I’m about halfway through and enjoying it a lot. This book also ties in nicely with the evolution unit I’m teaching in my biology class right now. I like being able to share tidbits from what I’m reading with my students.


Candice | 43 comments I’m excited to finally read the book club book along with the group! I just started this afternoon and agree that it is very accessible. I look forward to the evolution of birds since I’m an avid birder!

Candice


Nancy Mills (nancyfaym) | 407 comments I finally got around to starting this. I'm already in love with the beautiful birdlike, mule-sized fossil they've found in China. Looks like dinosaurs weren't the big, dump giant lizards we used to think they were.


Rumell Khan (rkrespectedmember) I've read this book 5 months ago and I really enjoyed this book. I love dinosaurs. The Quetzalcoatlus is my favourite Cretaceous dinosaur.


Candice | 43 comments I read it in two days! The author really brings them to life! Great book club choice. 🦖

Candice


Nancy Mills (nancyfaym) | 407 comments What a lively book! Truly brings dinosaurs to life in my mind. They really should make a movie about that gay Baron Franz Nopsca of Transylvania. ... what a character. Not only a dinosaur hunter and geologist but a spy in Albania. His story is a book in itself. I was never aware that Europe was just a bunch of islands during the cretaceous. ...inhabited by dwarf dinosaurs and going off on singularity peculiar paths of evolution. Like in the Galapagos, I suppose.
The Giants lived in the Americas and Asia but their European cousins are just as interesting.


Candice | 43 comments Nancy wrote: "What a lively book! Truly brings dinosaurs to life in my mind. They really should make a movie about that gay Baron Franz Nopsca of Transylvania. ... what a character. Not only a dinosaur hunter an..."

You might enjoy Dragon Teeth by Michael Crichton. It’s about Marsh and Cope competing for fossils. I would describe it as historical fiction.

Candice


message 12: by Steve (new)

Steve Van Slyke (steve_van_slyke) | 378 comments He mentions Dinosaur National Monument on the Utah-Colorado border. Amazing place. Don't miss it if you're ever in that area.

For those interested to read more about the dinosaur-bird connection I enjoyed Pat Shipman's Taking Wing: Archaeopteryx and the Evolution of Bird Flight

The discussion about the unique way that bird's breathe was fascinating.


Nancy Mills (nancyfaym) | 407 comments Candice wrote: "Nancy wrote: "What a lively book! Truly brings dinosaurs to life in my mind. They really should make a movie about that gay Baron Franz Nopsca of Transylvania. ... what a character. Not only a dino..."
Thank you Candice! I will look for that one, I like that sort of thing. Mr. Crichton must have been a dinosaur fan himself!


Nancy Mills (nancyfaym) | 407 comments Steve wrote: "He mentions Dinosaur National Monument on the Utah-Colorado border. Amazing place. Don't miss it if you're ever in that area.

For those interested to read more about the dinosaur-bird connection ..."


Agree. I didn't know birds breath differently than we do! I'm fascinated by evolution and will have to look up that book. Thanks for the hint.


Candice | 43 comments Nancy, I completely agree. I love Jurassic Park!

Candice 🦖


aPriL does feral sometimes  (cheshirescratch) | 277 comments The dinosaurs are so cute, Can I say that? Started reading today.


RM(Alwaysdaddygirl) (alwaydaddygirl) | 8 comments Aloha,

I am almost done with this! I love it! I like it that everyone can understand this for it helps brings folks to the world of science. I borrowed from my library. I will be buying this book.

Mahalo,
RM
🇺🇸🐾


message 18: by Katy (new) - added it

Katy (kathy_h) | 174 comments I won't be reading this book until May -- but am looking forward to it.


Shira (shira1981) I bought the book, thanks to your recommendations here, and will probably start reading it in the next few months.


Erica | 24 comments I finished it and loved it! I even read a little to my biology class :) And did you hear about the huge dinosaur fossil discovery made in China recently? Perfect timing (and I live in China so extra relevant to my students).

https://www.bbc.co.uk/news/amp/world-...


message 21: by Betsy, co-mod (new) - rated it 4 stars

Betsy | 1725 comments Mod
Also, a recent discovery in North Dakota is generating some controversy.

https://www.nytimes.com/2019/03/29/sc...


aPriL does feral sometimes  (cheshirescratch) | 277 comments Betsy wrote: "Also, a recent discovery in North Dakota is generating some controversy.

https://www.nytimes.com/2019/03/29/sc..."


Cool article.


Nancy Mills (nancyfaym) | 407 comments Betsy wrote: "Also, a recent discovery in North Dakota is generating some controversy.

https://www.nytimes.com/2019/03/29/sc..."

thanks for sharing, interesting article. What a sad day.
I notice the writer of the article refers to dinosaurs as "reptiles." I thought scientists had concluded that they were actually more like birds and that they were probably warm blooded.


message 24: by Betsy, co-mod (new) - rated it 4 stars

Betsy | 1725 comments Mod
Nancy wrote: "I notice the writer of the article refers to dinosaurs as "reptiles." I thought scientists had concluded that they were actually more like birds and that they were probably warm blooded."

You're right. I think the writer was not that knowledgeable about dinosaurs.


Nancy Mills (nancyfaym) | 407 comments For years I thought of them as giant lizards or alligator types. I prefer to imagine them as birds. I read somewhere that the closest living relative of T Rex is the chicken. I am very fond of chickens and love knowing that!


message 26: by Dana (new)

Dana (oddodddodo) | 26 comments Betsy wrote: "Nancy wrote: "I notice the writer of the article refers to dinosaurs as "reptiles." I thought scientists had concluded that they were actually more like birds and that they were probably warm blood..."

One of the writers, William Broad, is extremely knowledgeable; he has been the Times' geology writer for years and years. Recent research has shown that dinosaurs may not have been cold-blooded, but I don't think that changes the fact that they were reptiles.


message 27: by Dana (new)

Dana (oddodddodo) | 26 comments I'm sure that you all noticed that the author of the book we're discussing was quoted in the New York Times article. It looks as if it was kind of frustrating for him, because the researchers didn't say one word about dinosaurs in their scholarly article, even though the media plays up the dinosaur angle [see the headline!]. “But it’s disappointing that the dinosaurs are not mentioned in the peer-reviewed paper,” [Brusatte] said. “And because they’re not, there simply isn’t any evidence for me to assess.”


Susanna - Censored by GoodReads (susannag) | 368 comments Pretty sure dinosaurs are still regarded as having been reptiles; I believe the big change is that there's now a move to move birds into the same class.


aPriL does feral sometimes  (cheshirescratch) | 277 comments So, those kitties who can hunt birds immediately would gain a big bump in street cred....


message 30: by Jim (new) - rated it 4 stars

Jim (jimmaclachlan) | 662 comments Susanna - Censored by GoodReads wrote: "Pretty sure dinosaurs are still regarded as having been reptiles; I believe the big change is that there's now a move to move birds into the same class."

This seems to explain it fairly well.
https://askabiologist.asu.edu/questio...


Nancy Mills (nancyfaym) | 407 comments Thanks, Jim ... that resolves the issue pretty well, and allows me to think of dinosaurs as birds (and vice versa) while not arguing against them being reptiles .... I do wonder if they were warm blooded (like chickens) or cold blooded (like alligators.)


Nancy Mills (nancyfaym) | 407 comments aPriL does feral sometimes wrote: "So, those kitties who can hunt birds immediately would gain a big bump in street cred...."

They act as though they've know this all along .... maybe they are just carrying on a 100 million year old family feud ....


aPriL does feral sometimes  (cheshirescratch) | 277 comments I suspect you’ve nailed it, Nancy!

: D


message 34: by Jim (new) - rated it 4 stars

Jim (jimmaclachlan) | 662 comments I find something like the reptile versus bird question fascinating not just for the answer, but for how it highlights my own ignorance. I thought the question was simple & obvious. Of course, it isn't & much depends on how/why the distinction is being made.

I should know better by now, especially given the recent (for me) revelations about the definition of species in general & how vague sexual distinction can be within our own. Our labels should never be taken too seriously. The more I/we learn more, the fuzzier the lines get. Maybe I'll learn someday.


Herman Diaz | 64 comments Rumell wrote: "The Quetzalcoatlus is my favourite Cretaceous dinosaur."

Quetzalcoatlus is a pterosaur, not a dinosaur.


Herman Diaz | 64 comments In terms of overall quality, it's good, but has some problems that keep it from being great ( https://www.goodreads.com/review/show... ). If you want the best natural history of dinos for adults, get the newest edition of Naish/Barrett's "Dinosaurs: How They Lived and Evolved" ( https://www.goodreads.com/work/editio... ). I reviewed the 1st edition ( https://www.goodreads.com/review/show... ).


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