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GENERAL CONVERSATION > 50 Years Ago

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message 1: by JoAnn/QuAppelle (last edited Aug 21, 2009 06:01AM) (new)

JoAnn/QuAppelle | 1608 comments Mod
My sister is going to be celebrating her 50th birthday next month and I am giving her 50 gifts. One of them is an issue of LIFE magazine from the week she was born. Which led me to the next item......

I found a place online where you can find TIME magazine articles.....from 1923 to the present. I printed some of them out to give to my sister and have had so much fun looking at old issues from when my children were born, when I was born, etc. Here is the archive search page:

http://www.time.com/time/archive




JoAnn/QuAppelle | 1608 comments Mod
The point of this new topic was to post these once in a while....

Best Sellers of August 17, 1959

FICTION

1. Exodus, Uris (1)*

2. Lady Chatterley's Lover, Lawrence (2)

3. The Ugly American, Lederer and Burdick (3)

4. Dear and Glorious Physician, Caldwell (4)

5. Doctor Zhivago, Pasternak (5)

6. The Tents of Wickedness, De Vries (6)

7. Celia Garth, Bristow (7)

8. Lolita, Nabokov (8)

9. Wake Up, Stupid, Harris

10. The Light Infantry Ball, Basso

I have read all but 6,7,9,and 10 - and never even heard of them before now. How about anyone else???


message 3: by Bunny (new)

Bunny | 254 comments Those are the same ones I haven't read - I remember hearing about The Light Infantry Ball, but the other three are lost in history ~ there were some good books out that year.


JoAnn/QuAppelle | 1608 comments Mod
Bunny wrote: "Those are the same ones I haven't read - I remember hearing about The Light Infantry Ball, but the other three are lost in history ~ there were some good books out that year."

The list for September has even more books that I have read. Will post that in a week or so. It WAS a good year. I can close my eyes and picture my mother reading most of them. Sigh....


message 5: by madrano (new)

madrano | 444 comments Fun list, JoAnn. In addition to the numbers you two gave, i hadn't heard of #4. I look forward to the Sept. list. Great gift for your sister, btw. I think i'll do that when my baby sister turns 50 next year. Thanks.

deb


message 6: by Shannon (new)

Shannon | 43 comments JoAnn, what a great idea for a birthday gift! The TIME Magazine idea is a treasure.

My uncle located a copy of Collier's Magazine on eBay that contained a story about his father from 1947. His father had taken off for New York in the 30s and no one had heard much of him. The article told of his life answering mail for a number of radio programs. He claimed to be a bachelor running the business with his brother.

Of course, he wasn't a bachelor. He had a wife and two kids in Seattle that he wasn't supporting in any way, shape, or form. And he didn't have a brother.

My father saw the magazine at a friend's house when he was 18 and had a fit. Grandma divorced Grandpa that year. She'd finally had enough.

For my uncle, owning that bit of history was cathartic, to say the least!


message 7: by Bunny (new)

Bunny | 254 comments Good grief, Shannon. This is just the kind of detail one doesn't get when tracing family trees, darn it :)


JoAnn/QuAppelle | 1608 comments Mod
What a story, Shannon!

How in the world did your uncle find out about the story in a 1947 Collier's Magazine?


JoAnn/QuAppelle | 1608 comments Mod
madrano wrote: "Fun list, JoAnn. In addition to the numbers you two gave, i hadn't heard of #4. I look forward to the Sept. list. Great gift for your sister, btw. I think i'll do that when my baby sister turns 50 next year. Thanks ..."

A few words of advice. I started buying the gifts months ago but left all the wrapping until the end. Big mistake. I had two marathon wrapping sessions last week and am not done yet.

I tried to make the gifts things that are useful because my sister does not need clutter in her house. And she is very particular about scents, so soaps and lotions were a no-no. I got her quite a few stationery items that I know she will use.

I cannot wait to give these to her! The gifts look really pretty...my "theme" is purple, so they are all wrapped in various purple papers and ribbons.




message 10: by madrano (new)

madrano | 444 comments JoAnn, thanks for the tips. I like the idea of coming up with things from her birthday/year. Last year at a nearby junk story she bought several "Year Books" by some encyclopedia, from '57-62, which included her year of '60. We had such fun looking through that!

deb


message 11: by Shannon (new)

Shannon | 43 comments Collier's was just as popular as Life magazine back in the day. The friend's family, back in 1947, had a subscription, so the magazine was on the coffee table. Both my uncle and I had seen bound copies in the library in later years. Getting his hands on an actual copy was a real coup.

The grandfather was an interesting guy, to put it mildly. When he died, my uncle and I got half of what was left. My uncle called the $249/month payment his "child support" that was more than 50 years overdue.

JoAnn/QuAppelle wrote: "What a story, Shannon!

How in the world did your uncle find out about the story in a 1947 Collier's Magazine?"





message 12: by JoAnn/QuAppelle (new)

JoAnn/QuAppelle | 1608 comments Mod
Shannon wrote: "Collier's was just as popular as Life magazine back in the day. The friend's family, back in 1947, had a subscription, so the magazine was on the coffee table.

But how did your uncle know there was a story about your father in Collier's? Did someone else tell him? Did he search the bound issues?



message 13: by Shannon (new)

Shannon | 43 comments >>But how did your uncle know there was a story about your father in Collier's? Did someone else tell him? Did he search the bound issues?<<

Because he saw the original magazine, JoAnn, in 1947.


message 14: by JoAnn/QuAppelle (new)

JoAnn/QuAppelle | 1608 comments Mod
Shannon wrote: "Because he saw the original magazine, JoAnn, in 1947."

oh, I had not realized that! DUH! I thought he found it by accident on e-bay




message 15: by JoAnn/QuAppelle (new)

JoAnn/QuAppelle | 1608 comments Mod
September 7, 1959 Fiction bestsellers

1. Lady Chatterley's Lover, Lawrence (2)

2. Exodus, Uris (1)

3. The Ugly American, Lederer and Burdick (3)

4. Advise and Consent, Drury (6)

5. The Art of Llewellyn Jones, Bonner (8)

6. Dear and Glorious Physician, Caldwell (4)

7. Doctor Zhivago, Pasternak (5)

8. The Tents of Wickedness, De Vries

9. Mrs. 'Arris Goes to Paris, Gallico (7)

10. Celia Garth, Bristow (9)

I have not read 5,8,9, and 10

I think I have read every Drury and Caldwell book that was published....many of them as a teenager. Drury only died 11 years ago. He won the Pulitzer for the book listed here. His books all were page-turners with great plots.

"The Ugly American" is one of the few books I have read several times. In fact, I just read it again about a year ago.


message 16: by Bunny (new)

Bunny | 254 comments JoAnn/QuAppelle wrote: "September 7, 1959 Fiction bestsellers

1. Lady Chatterley's Lover, Lawrence (2)

2. Exodus, Uris (1)

3. The Ugly American, Lederer and Burdick (3)

4. Advise and Consent, Drury (6)

5. The Art of..."


I haven't read 5, 7, 8 and 10. We read all of Drury and Caldwell in my home, too (everybody in my family read) - love Ugly American, too. Did you see the last movie version? It was pretty good.




message 17: by JoAnn/QuAppelle (new)

JoAnn/QuAppelle | 1608 comments Mod
Bunny, I only know of one movie version of "The Ugly American", the one with Marlon Brando, made in the 60s. Was there another more recently?


message 18: by Bunny (new)

Bunny | 254 comments Oh, I had it wrong - I'm thinking of The Quiet American! No remake of Ugly American.


message 19: by Carole (new)

Carole Nabozny | 8 comments Good morning! How I have been enjoying this board, and catching up on what people are reading and doing these days! I am almost embarrassed to say that the last thing I read was the "Twilight" Series, which I read while on vacation in NC this summer, for lack of something else when I had finished the other books I took with me.. Sheepishly admitting that I enjoyed them! LOL.. Read Garden of Last Days before that.. Now that fall is nearly here I have been concentrating on moving furniture around to treat myself to a great craft/sewing room so I can work on all of the sewing and scrapbooking projects I have lined up for myself!
I have a question.. can someone tell me if YankeeNana is to be found anywhere? Jayne Stroup used to be quite a presence on the old "Book Nook"..??


message 20: by JoAnn/QuAppelle (new)

JoAnn/QuAppelle | 1608 comments Mod
Carol, have not *seen* nor heard of Jane for years.

The best thing about the kind of room you are creating for yourself is not having to clean it up every time you stop working. I have a craft/art loft at the beach and have converted a bedroom at home for the same purpose. FREEDOM!


message 21: by Sue/Gazebo316 (new)

Sue/Gazebo316 (SueGazebo316) | 49 comments Last year Jayne (yankeenana) moved, with her husband, to an asssited living facility near her daughter. She's not been on the computer much since then.


message 22: by Alias Reader (new)

Alias Reader (aliasreader) JoAnn/QuAppelle wrote: "My sister is going to be celebrating her 50th birthday next month and I am giving her 50 gifts. ...."
==============================

JoAnn, was your sister born in 1959 ?

If so, there is a new book out that might be good as a possible gift. It's titled, 1959: The Year Everything Changed (Hardcover)by Fred Kaplan.
[image error]
http://www.amazon.com/1959-Everything...

and another book from a few years ago
1959: The Year that Changed Our World (Paperback)
by Bernard Diederich
1959 The Year that Changed Our World by Bernard Diederich
http://www.amazon.com/1959-Year-that-...

Fifty Things to Do When You Turn Fifty: Fifty Experts on the Subject of Turning Fifty (Paperback)
by Ronnie Sellers
Fifty Things to Do When You Turn Fifty (Fifty Experts on the Subject of Turning Fifty) (Fifty Experts on the Subject of Turning Fifty) by Allison Kyle Leopold
http://www.amazon.com/Fifty-Things-Wh...

On Women Turning Fifty: Celebrating Mid-Life Discoveries [BARGAIN PRICE:] (Paperback)
by Cathleen Rountree
On Women Turning Fifty Celebrating Mid-Life Discoveries by Cathleen Rountree
http://www.amazon.com/Women-Turning-F...

If you go to amazon, they will show you a bunch of books about turning 50 and the year 1959.




message 23: by JoAnn/QuAppelle (new)

JoAnn/QuAppelle | 1608 comments Mod
Thanks, Alias. I had looked at a bunch of those "50" books and told my sister about them too.


message 24: by madrano (new)

madrano | 444 comments Interesting titles, Alias. I will buy the 50 experts one for my sister's 50th next year. I didn't feel lost or worried when i turned 50 but when DH neared retirement i wondered a bit. 'Tis fine!

deb


message 25: by Carole (new)

Carole Nabozny | 8 comments madrano wrote: "Interesting titles, Alias. I will buy the 50 experts one for my sister's 50th next year. I didn't feel lost or worried when i turned 50 but when DH neared retirement i wondered a bit. 'Tis fine!

..."


I have never fretted over birthdays, have always loved my birthdays, as that is the one day each year that belongs to just ME. Turning sixty (nearly 4 years ago!) wasn't a problem.. HOWEVER, realizing that my daughter was 40 was traumatic! LOL!


message 26: by Carole (new)

Carole Nabozny | 8 comments JoAnn/QuAppelle wrote: "Carol, have not *seen* nor heard of Jane for years.

The best thing about the kind of room you are creating for yourself is not having to clean it up every time you stop working. I have a craft/art..."


JoAnn/QuAppelle wrote: "Carol, have not *seen* nor heard of Jane for years.

The best thing about the kind of room you are creating for yourself is not having to clean it up every time you stop working. I have a craft/art..."


So true! I have been working on projects on my dining room table, which puts us on the sofa in front of the TV at mealtime if there is a "work in progress". Craft room almost ready, and just in time for holiday projects. Right now my "reading" is revolving around books about scrapbooking and papercrafts!


message 27: by Sandy (new)

Sandy | 12 comments madrano wrote: "Interesting titles, Alias. I will buy the 50 experts one for my sister's 50th next year. I didn't feel lost or worried when i turned 50 but when DH neared retirement i wondered a bit. 'Tis fine!

..."

Turning 50 was wonderful for me. I had my hairdresser cut my hair short as possible and threw away the brush and blow dryer. I was done with hair and have never regretted my decision. 60 didn't bother me either, but I do quail at the thought that I will be 70 in 4 years!



message 28: by madrano (new)

madrano | 444 comments Sandy, i've had my hair long since i was a senior in high school but the last couple of years i keep thinking i'd like it short, as you did. Yours is an encouraging story. I always liked the idea of being old with long hair but, honestly, it seems to get in the way more than not!

deborah


message 29: by JoAnn/QuAppelle (new)

JoAnn/QuAppelle | 1608 comments Mod
I have had fairly short-ish hair since I was 50-ish....and when I was 55, discovered that it looked the same whether or not I used the blow dryer. What a shocking discovery. All that wasted time. I never blow dry my hair now unless I have to go out into the cold just after washing it.


message 30: by JoAnn/QuAppelle (new)

JoAnn/QuAppelle | 1608 comments Mod
BOOKS

Best Reading - TIME magazine Nov. 2, 1959

I have not read one of these! Schmerguls???

The Armada, by Garrett Mattingly. A clear, exciting account of one of history's most crucial and inept naval campaigns, and of the stormy political climate in which it was fought.

The Stones of Florence, by Mary McCarthy. Without sentiment or solemn artiness, the author describes the city that "invented" the Renaissance.

Poems, by Boris Pasternak, translated by Eugene M. Kayden. The delicate fusion of sound and sense is sometimes ob scured in translation, but the greatness of the poet shows through.

The Return of H*Y*M*K*A*N*K*A*P*L*A*N, by Leo Rosten. The famed immigrant warrior against the English language is back with the same old tsplit infinitifs and dobble nagetifs, and he is just as funny as ever.

The Memoirs of Casanova, Vol. II, translated by Arthur Machen. In the best English translation to date, the grand old libertine tells of adventures that would reduce today's flanneled philanderers to cardiac cases.

The Devil's Advocate, by Morris West. An effective novel about a cancer-stricken priest who finds his first (and last) contact with life as he turns spiritual detective, investigates the lives of a possible saint and of the sinners involved in his death.

A Natural History of New York City, by John Kieran. A naturalist's engaging account of how nature survives in the asphalt jungle.

Observations, by Richard Avedon. Portraits of the famous, some impudent, some cruel, by a noted fashion photographer, with a commentary by Truman Capote.

The Rack, by A. E. Ellis. A chilling novel of a cynically run tuberculosis sanatorium in which hope dies quickly, the patients more slowly.

Orde Wingate, by Christopher Sykes. A first-rate biography of the stumpy, tempestuous jungle fighter who became World War II's Lion of Burma.

Beyond Survival, by Max Ways. What the U.S. needs, the author argues in a trenchant review of the nation's foreign policy, is a coherent public philosophy.

Act One, by Moss Hart. A playwright's fascinating, immensely entertaining account of his agitated life in the theater.

The Real Life of Sebastian Knight, by Vladimir Nabokov. An early, excellent Nabokov novel in which a dead author's brother puzzles over disturbing matters of art and identity.

This Is My God, by Herman Wouk. The author, an Orthodox Jew and a bestselling novelist (Marjorie Morningstar), provides a clear, simple guide to his faith.


message 31: by JoAnn/QuAppelle (new)

JoAnn/QuAppelle | 1608 comments Mod
BEST SELLERS 50 YEARS AGO THIS WEEK


FICTION

1. Advise and Consent, Drury (1)*

2. The Ugly American, Lederer and Burdick (3)

3. Exodus, Uris (2)

4. Dear and Glorious Physician, Caldwell (5)

5. The War Lover, Hersey (8)

6. The Cave, Warren (4)

7. The Thirteenth Apostle, Vale (9)

8. Station Wagon in Spain, Keyes

9. The Lotus Eaters, Green

10. New Face in the Mirror, Dayan

NON-FICTION

1. Act One, Hart (3)

2. Folk Medicine, Jarvis (4)

3. The Status Seekers, Packard (1)

4. For 2 Plain, Golden (2)

5. The Elements of Style, Strunk and White (6)

6. This Is My God, Wouk (7)

7. How I Turned $1,000 into $1,000,000 in Real Estate, Nickerson (5)

8. Groucho and Me. Marx (10)

9. The Ape in Me, Skinner

10. Mine Enemy Grows Older, King (9)

-Position on last week's list.


message 32: by JoAnn/QuAppelle (new)

JoAnn/QuAppelle | 1608 comments Mod
The top 3 novels are among my all-time favorite books. And # 8 is by a beloved (and prolific) author whose novels I started reading in 6th grade.


message 33: by Bunny (new)

Bunny | 254 comments JoAnn/QuAppelle wrote: " BEST SELLERS 50 YEARS AGO THIS WEEK


FICTION

1. Advise and Consent, Drury (1)*

2. The Ugly American, Lederer and Burdick (3)

3. Exodus..."


Oh, we read about all of these in our household and loved them, too. My sister gave me Act One by Moss Hart for Christmas that year - great gift!


message 34: by Sandi (new)

Sandi (sandin954) | 211 comments >>3. Exodus, Uris (2)<<

I remember I was reading Exodus when I heard that John Lennon had been shot. A couple of weeks earlier I had found an old ratty paperback of Mila 18 in our basement, loved it, and then read everything by Uris I could get my hands on for the next few months. Those two along with Battle Cry are still among my favorite reads of all time.

Just put Advise and Consent on hold at the library.


message 35: by JoAnn/QuAppelle (new)

JoAnn/QuAppelle | 1608 comments Mod
Sandi wrote: ">>Just put Advise and Consent on hold at the library. .."

I am delighted to find out that libraries still have this on their shelves.

Sandy, did you read Uris's novel about Ireland, Trinity? What a powerful book that was!




message 36: by Sandi (new)

Sandi (sandin954) | 211 comments >>Sandi, did you read Uris's novel about Ireland, Trinity? What a powerful book that was!<<

Yes I did read it but much later than his other works (it was sometime after college) so therefore I have never reread it (I quite rereading books after I entered the workforce) and do not have the vivid memories of it that I have of the others. Trinity was probably the last of his really good books for me. I found Mitla Pass only OK and actively disliked The Haj.


message 37: by JoAnn/QuAppelle (new)

JoAnn/QuAppelle | 1608 comments Mod
Sandi wrote: ". Trinity was probably the last of his really good books for me. I found Mitla Pass only OK and actively disliked The Haj.
..."


I agree. I have always wanted to read Redemption, the follow-up to Trinity. I have had it on my shelves for so many years now that I would probably have to re-read "Trinity" in order to remember what went on!

Uris did his research for "Trinity" in Irelend with his then-wife Jill taking photographs for a book they later published. Gorgeous photos. My family and I all looked at the book before we went to Ireland and it gave us a real "feel" for what we later saw.


message 38: by Reeves (new)

Reeves Honey | 142 comments RE: Frances Parkinson Keyes. I too read her stuff when I was young. In 1998 when my Dad was on Hospice his nurse was a relation of this author. That is when I was told the proper pronunciation is "kize" not like house keys!


message 39: by Bunny (new)

Bunny | 254 comments R. wrote: "RE: Frances Parkinson Keyes. I too read her stuff when I was young. In 1998 when my Dad was on Hospice his nurse was a relation of this author. That is when I was told the proper pronunciation i..."

Ah, remember Dinner at Antoine's? I remembered it so vividly that that was the first restaurant I wanted to go to in New Orleans. We had a hilarious time beginning with our arrival at 5 minutes to 8 for our 8 PM reservations, only to find the door locked. At 8 promptly, the door opened and we were allowed in!


message 40: by JoAnn/QuAppelle (new)

JoAnn/QuAppelle | 1608 comments Mod
Oh, yes, I well remember "Dinner at Antoine's" and went to see the place the one and only and final time I was in New Orleans. Guess they dine late there!

The other place I went to see while in NO was FPK's house, across from the Ursuline school/convent.

What a life Keyes had! I felt like I traveled all over thanks to her novels. I have her two-part autobiography here to read.

R, I remember you telling me about that nurse!


message 41: by Bunny (new)

Bunny | 254 comments JoAnn/QuAppelle wrote: "Oh, yes, I well remember "Dinner at Antoine's" and went to see the place the one and only and final time I was in New Orleans. Guess they dine late there!

The other place I went to see while in NO..."


Let me know how the autobiography is - sounds good to me.


Sherry (sethurner) (sthurner) Oh Lord, I thought The Elements of Style came down from the mountain with Moses!


message 43: by Sarah (new)

Sarah (sarahreader) Oh Lord, I thought The Elements of Style came down from the mountain with Moses!

Ha! I went looking for my old copy of The Elements of Style, but it must have fallen apart years ago. I did find my son's copy, the 4th edition, which I keep right by my desk. You're right, Sherry, that it was originally a much older book. EB White's introduction says that William Strunk was his English teacher in Cornell, and the original booklet was written in 1919! I think that White spruced it up and it was reissued under "Strunk and White" in 1959. I used to treasure it and would re-read it before undertaking big writing assignments or briefs. Sadly, I never really incorporated its lessons. I was always a wordy, convoluted writer, breaking Rule 17 relentlessly. ("17: Omit needless words. Vigorous writing is concise."


Carolyn (in SC) C234D | 123 comments This has no doubt been covered before, but could someone tell me how to fix it so I don't have to go through all the posts in a thread in order to read the newest? Or can't we?


message 45: by JoAnn/QuAppelle (new)

JoAnn/QuAppelle | 1608 comments Mod
Carolyn, there is a place at the top of the page/thread of posts where you can click on the word DATE. This will bring the newest post to the top. Is this what you mean?


message 46: by JoAnn/QuAppelle (new)

JoAnn/QuAppelle | 1608 comments Mod
Carolyn, here is a better explanation than mine:

If you only want to see new posts find the box on the right side that says:
Search Posts

Under that box you will see a link for: unread topics.

Just click on that and then you will see only the new posts in a thread.

* if you want to go back to the full list of all the Folders, just click on "Discussions" from the list about the search posts box.


message 47: by JoAnn/QuAppelle (new)

JoAnn/QuAppelle | 1608 comments Mod
Bunny, did you know that Dinner at Antoine's was F.P. Keyes biggest-selling book AND the only mystery she ever wrote?!?!?!


message 48: by JoAnn/QuAppelle (new)

JoAnn/QuAppelle | 1608 comments Mod
Best Sellers 50 Years Ago This Week

I included a link to the original TIME review of Ruark's book, and on to a recent article about the Shulman book.

FICTION

1. Advise and Consent, Drury (1)*
2. The War Lover, Hersey (5)
3. The Ugly American, Lederer and Burdick (2)
4. Exodus, Uris (3)
5. The Devil's Advocate, West (8)
6. Dear and Glorious Physician, Caldwell (6)
7. Poor No More, Ruark http://www.time.com/time/magazine/art...
8. The Cave, Warren
9. The Thirteenth Apostle, Vale (7)
10. I Was a Teen-Age Dwarf, Shulman (10)
http://www.sheilaomalley.com/archives...

NONFICTION

1. Act One, Hart (1)
2. The Status Seekers, Packard (2)
3. For 2¢ Plain, Golden (5)
4. Folk Medicine, Jarvis (3)
5. This Is My God, Wouk (4)
6. Groucho and Me, Marx (8)
7. The Elements of Style, Strunk and White (6)
8. The Armada, Mattingly
9. Tie Ape in Me, Skinner (10)
10. A Natural History of New York City, Kieran (9)
*Position on last week's list.




message 49: by madrano (new)

madrano | 444 comments Thank you for including the article about Shulman, JoAnn. I thought i recognized the name as the guy who created Dobie Gillis, so to find this is where he introduced the character is fun. I'm going to have to try to find some of his work, too.

deborah


message 50: by Charles (last edited Nov 18, 2009 05:56AM) (new)

Charles (OcotilloArts) JoAnn/QuAppelle wrote: "The point of this new topic was to post these once in a while....

Best Sellers of August 17, 1959

A while back I decided to see if I could find out whether novels these days were worse than they used to
be. I read, or looked through, everything on the NY Times notable books list for a year. Sparing you the detailed classification, it was about six keepers a year. When you go back to previous periods now viewed as fiction paradise, like the 20s, and count the books we still read it was about the same. I took account of more books than the best sellers, and included among the keepers books which maybe not EVERYone reads, like Dos Passos, but the figure was about the same -- six a year. The 1959 list looks about typical, doesn't it?



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