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Odd & Ends > Reading novels by Virginia Woolf (spoilers)

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message 1: by Inkspill (last edited Dec 18, 2018 02:30AM) (new)

Inkspill (runinkspill) Hello, to make it easier for everyone to find your post, please mention the title of the novel on the top line, press enter a couple of times to leave a space or blank line, before writing your text. Thanks.

Example shown in message 3.


message 2: by Inkspill (new)

Inkspill (runinkspill) This thread accompanies the general discussion of reading novels by Virginia Woolf, found here:
https://www.goodreads.com/topic/show/...

In 2019 I'm planning to start reading the first few novels by Woolf in the order they were first published.

Feel free to post your spoilers on Woolfs' novels here, reading the novels you want and in the order you want. Enjoy!!


message 3: by Inkspill (last edited Dec 18, 2018 02:33AM) (new)

Inkspill (runinkspill) The Voyage Out

My first spoilers will be posted here when I start reading this in 2019.


message 4: by Inkspill (last edited Jan 16, 2019 02:48AM) (new)

Inkspill (runinkspill) The Voyage Out


25% in, I like how Woolf shows a character through different points of view, and how she draws some characters with an unapologetic snobbism, making this an entertaining read. The story is delivered with a dry wit.

The description is breathtaking, especially the opening scene as the Ambrose's walk through a part of London, and the storm causing the waters to be choppy (chapter 5), the backdrop to a mood change in the story.

On the surface it doesn't seem like much is happening, but underneath tension is bubbling.

There's loads of hints about Rachel, one of the heroines, that leaves me wondering what is going to happen.

BTW: It was surprise to find the Dalloways present and the main focus for a couple of chapters. (I'm quite tempted now to Mrs Dalloway next to see what Woolf does with this characters.)


message 5: by Sarah (new)

Sarah B (skauthen) | 581 comments Mod
See, I worry that I'll never get emotionally close to Woolf (and many other members of the group, actually) because of how much of an unapologetic snob she is. I'm struggling through some of her diaries for that reason. Though I have to admit, she is cuttingly astute and I can't help but grudgingly sympathise with some of her put-downs when they are particularly apt. Seems as if she was the original mean girl.

On a lighter note, her visual descriptions are painterly. Today I read her describing Athens from the Acropolis as looking like broken egg shells and I can think of no better simile.

Would like to be reading To the Lighthouse with you but I'm up to my neck in Leonard research. Thanks for the updates!


message 6: by Inkspill (new)

Inkspill (runinkspill) Sarah wrote: "... I'm struggling through some of her diaries for that reason. "

I've seen some of Woolf's diary entries. Oh, yeah - she gets to the point, no tact, no diplomacy - and with a bite.

I'm finding her fiction is different, she brings that sharpness to delve into the subtler shades of character.

It's wonderful to read, her words are lile embroidery, delicate threads that carefully woven in an intricate way to build a complicated story. I say complicated because on the surface it looks like not much happens. I'll post more spoiler soon.

On a side note: I kind of remember reading somewhere that language and experimented with language interested Woolf. Yeah, it shows.


message 7: by Inkspill (new)

Inkspill (runinkspill) Sarah wrote: "Would like to be reading To the Lighthouse with you but I'm up to my neck in Leonard research."

Your research sounds interesting.

reading To the Lighthouse, no worries, I'll post on the non-spiler thread when I start reading it, and if you can I'm happy to read this with you


message 8: by Inkspill (new)

Inkspill (runinkspill) So I finished this a couple of weeks ago but needed a bit of time as this was a breathtaking read. Sarah mentioned Woolf can be acerbic in her diaries, oh yeah but from this novel I would not On the surface Woolf gives us an ordinary romance, girl in meeting boy, discovers feelings of love and romance breaking out of her isolated self. Instead, Woolf breaks through the ordinary by telling the story from multi-points of view that are slowly assembled, bringing themes like isolation, love and death to life.

I got the sense the setting for Wolf was less important to her than her characters, for most of it the novel is set in South America but this did not distract Woolf from her characters; done with a touch of comedy in portraying their Englishness. Woolf’s touch is not as light as Jane Austen’s but this tangent of witticism is a charm I would have never expected from Woolf.

This is the first of the four novels I will read by Woolf this year, the next one will be in Spring, Night and Day


message 9: by Sarah (new)

Sarah B (skauthen) | 581 comments Mod
It's wonderful to read, her words are lile embroidery, delicate threads that carefully woven in an intricate way to build a complicated story. I say complicated because on the surface it looks like not much happens.

Well said all around! Thank you for the review. Tally ho and on to the next book! I salute your efforts.


message 10: by Inkspill (new)

Inkspill (runinkspill) Sarah wrote: "It's wonderful to read, her words are lile embroidery, delicate threads that carefully woven in an intricate way to build a complicated story. I say complicated because on the surface it looks like..."

Thanks. I've started to read the next one. Kind of different from the first one. The heroine, Katharine Hilberry is mainly modelled on her sister Vanessa Bell.


message 11: by Inkspill (new)

Inkspill (runinkspill) Night and Day was an easier read than her first novel. The story is not as tight but interesting in how it showed the beginnings of the New Woman. The setting is Edwardian England, just before the war.

In this novel, Woolf bases her characters on people in her lives, two of her relatives, Anny Thackery Ritchie and Julia Margaret Cameron are inspirations for the characters of Mrs Hilberry and Queenie Colqhoun, respectively.

I'll be reading the next novel in the fall / autumn, Jacob’s Room


message 12: by Inkspill (new)

Inkspill (runinkspill) Finished reading Jacob’s Room, the toughest of the three but a really interesting read.

review posted here https://www.goodreads.com/review/show...


message 13: by Joe (new)

Joe | 465 comments Mod
Inkspill wrote: "Finished reading Jacob’s Room, the toughest of the three but a really interesting read.

review posted here https://www.goodreads.com/review/show..."


Good! Tough going like your say . Like walking neck high in molasses in some parts


message 14: by Inkspill (new)

Inkspill (runinkspill) Joe wrote: "Inkspill wrote: "Finished reading Jacob’s Room, the toughest of the three but a really interesting read.

review posted here https://www.goodreads.com/review/show..."

Good!..."


:)

yep at times it was that tough but worth it, and I'm hoping good practice for the next one Mrs. Dalloway, I''l be reading around Autumn followed by The Hours novel and The Hours screenplay.

I guess I just can't get enough of that molasses


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