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Intersectional Feminism > The Hijab And Feminism

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message 1: by Ross (new)

Ross Wade | 1 comments At school (I’m a curious 12 year old with a deep love for sarcasm) I’m studying ethics and beliefs and I’m studying feminism and I stand by it, I’ve stood by it all my life and the issues that feminists undergo is mortifying, nevertheless my confusion resonates from this topic: Muslims wearing the hijab and Non-Muslim Women exposing skin say on a beach or at a swimming pool, When a Muslim women wears the hijab, a feminist may say something along the lines of ‘what a cruel Male-dominated planet we live on’...but if a Muslim women walks past a women in a bikini she may say something along those lines, I decided to join this group to share the love of all women across the world and to get an insider on feminism itself. please respond as quickly as you can.

I accept all religions and beliefs and if I have offended any religious groups or feminist groups,

My sincerest apologies.
Also if I’m too young to be a part of this group please tell me I am in your comments below.

Ross

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message 2: by [deleted user] (new)

Ross wrote: "At school (I’m a curious 12 year old with a deep love for sarcasm) I’m studying ethics and beliefs and I’m studying feminism and I stand by it, I’ve stood by it all my life and the issues that femi..."

hi! Im a Muslim.
many ppl say why Muslim women wear hijab? Why don't they expose their bodies? Why don't they wear bikini?
So here is the answer:
The God has created female and men and then when in Islam was not existent, Men used to bury Women due to honor. Women were considered as Shame but the prophet Mohammad(P.B.U.H) came and he was the first person to start Feminism.

"And i command you to be nice with your Women and give them equal rights"-Mohammad(P.B.U.H)
"And Women has equal rights as men"- Holy Quran
"And be nice to your wives"-Holy Quran
Islam gave the women a rank of respect. In early times, those women who used to wear hijab were considered as a woman with nice characters but those who don't were called as a woman with lose character. Therefore, Islam asked the women to hide their bodies from Na-Mehram( is an marriageable kin with whom marriage or sexual intercourse would be considered haram, illegal in Islam, or people from whom purdah is not obligatory or legal escorts of a woman during journey longer than a day and night, 24 hours.) so that everyone will respect them.
In the Muslim countries still now the women are respected and when a women is walking the men just stop right there and don't even look at them, and now see the European countries, Women are having 3-4 boyfriends, sex before marriage, insecure. Raising voice for Feminism but Muslim women are lucky that Islam has given them the freedom already.
Muslim women were the first one to come forward in politics and science.

"And you the mankind gain knowledge"-Al Quran
Islam doesn't say that Knowledge is for men only.
"And Education is necessary on both men and women"- Prophet Mohammad(P.B.U.H)


I hope you understand.


Cheryl Lancelot | 4 comments I think the term feminism could mean different in practice to ppl with different ethnic background. I can see your confusion and to be honest, I am also a bit wondering why the girls wear headscarves as well. I am just kinda guessing. Maybe for them, wearing hijab is an honour, just like we non-muslim pursue fashion. I don't know about the Koran, but it seems to have some symbolic meaning for Muslim, a protection or something. So lots of outsiders consider hijab as some kinda restrain for women may be because they don't know about Koran and Muslim.
The road of feminism is rough, one of the obstacles is that we can't really see if a daily basis is a restriction or harm to women or not.


message 4: by Sarina-Soren (new)

Sarina-Soren (inquisitiveowl) | 26 comments Ross wrote: "At school (I’m a curious 12 year old with a deep love for sarcasm) I’m studying ethics and beliefs and I’m studying feminism and I stand by it, I’ve stood by it all my life and the issues that femi..."

You are never too young to share your opinions and questions, especially not on OSS. <3

I think what you are talking about has to do with the mutual misunderstanding some people might have for each other. We as humans tend to make incorrect assumptions on why people do what they do (like assuming wearing a hijab or wearing a bikini has to do with being in a male-dominated society, and not a conscious decision on the part of the wearer) which makes it extremely important that we all ask questions to gain more understanding so we don’t continue making those same assumptions of people. For example, someone could assume that make-up is a part of being in a male-dominated society, but if they asked a woman why they wear make-up (a discussion somewhere in OSS) the person might surprise them and say they wear make-up for themselves, not for a man or anyone else.


message 5: by Pam (new)

Pam | 1091 comments Mod
Cheryl Lancelot wrote: "I think the term feminism could mean different in practice to ppl with different ethnic background. I can see your confusion and to be honest, I am also a bit wondering why the girls wear headscarv..."

Fun fact: Christianity (for a period of time) required women to cover their head.

Corinthians: 11:2-16 King James Version (KJV)
2 Now I praise you, brethren, that ye remember me in all things, and keep the ordinances, as I delivered them to you.

3 But I would have you know, that the head of every man is Christ; and the head of the woman is the man; and the head of Christ is God.

4 Every man praying or prophesying, having his head covered, dishonoureth his head.

5 But every woman that prayeth or prophesieth with her head uncovered dishonoureth her head: for that is even all one as if she were shaven.

6 For if the woman be not covered, let her also be shorn: but if it be a shame for a woman to be shorn or shaven, let her be covered.

7 For a man indeed ought not to cover his head, forasmuch as he is the image and glory of God: but the woman is the glory of the man.

8 For the man is not of the woman: but the woman of the man.

9 Neither was the man created for the woman; but the woman for the man.

10 For this cause ought the woman to have power on her head because of the angels.

11 Nevertheless neither is the man without the woman, neither the woman without the man, in the Lord.

12 For as the woman is of the man, even so is the man also by the woman; but all things of God.

13 Judge in yourselves: is it comely that a woman pray unto God uncovered?

14 Doth not even nature itself teach you, that, if a man have long hair, it is a shame unto him?

15 But if a woman have long hair, it is a glory to her: for her hair is given her for a covering.

16 But if any man seem to be contentious, we have no such custom, neither the churches of God.


Now, as many of you know, not many Christian women keep to this fact. It is still practiced (Black churches and their crowns or amazing hats; or small pockets of Orthodox believers) but not to the extent it once was. Catholicism only changed this after Vatican 2, but to this day my grandmother still covers her head when she enters and bows before the Lord. Another note, Christian nuns still wear habits, or head coverings that covers their hair too. And yet we do not persecute them or tell them they are not being feminist. Why is that?

Our Jewish brothers wear a yamaka or a yarmulke. Orthodox members are to wears these constantly, and not just during church hours.

Why are our Muslim sisters punished for something that Abrahamic traditions approve?

Or we could even look to our brothers the Sikhs, whose turban or dastaars are an article of faith that represents honour, self-respect, courage, spirituality, and piety. A constant reminder of their faith as much as a cross pendant is to a Christian.


message 6: by [deleted user] (last edited Dec 19, 2018 05:05AM) (new)

The jilbab is a full-covering and the Hijab is a head-covering. The location of the wearer (be it Tehran or Cairo, in the classroom or at the beach) will usually indicate the necessity of either garment. In locations such as Tehran, a full covering is mandated by Shari'ah law and a woman is taking a great risk not to don the garment. However, in most locations globally, Shari'ah law is not enforced and, for many women swathed in these garments, the "fashion" statement is secondary to the spiritual benefits which they offer. Globally (Tehran included), the wearer is assured that before Allah and before her peers, she wishes to be seen as well as heard as a voice of reason (the selection of wardrobe is considered to be a non-verbal prayer). An interesting book to consider reading is Maria M. Ebrahimji (Editor) and Zahra T Suratwala's (Editor) collection of narratives, I Speak for Myself, which includes the opinions of a collection of American Muslim women who speak about their individual experiences. Many pose a defensive argument; their claim is that the Hijab liberates them from greedy eyes. The head covering affords a woman the comfort of unadulterated thought which, given an audience, conveys knowledge and wisdom through speech.
https://www.goodreads.com/book/show/1...


message 7: by [deleted user] (new)

Also noteworthy is that the most common article of clothing worn underneath a Muslim woman's vestments is a pair of blue jeans. The security of denim is favored among women.


message 8: by Benarji (new)

Benarji Anand | 153 comments It is a matter of perspective and a mental block. When Eastern women look to the West, they think that women cheapen themselves for not restraining themselves in front of a man. It is a question of pride as they hold themselves to a high esteem. They refrain themselves from indulging in social activities for fear of perversion. Also, it is thought that covering up limits a person's imagination for lustful thoughts but lol, they obviously underestimate the power of a man's imaginative mind.

On the other hand, Western women thinks their counterpart are oppressed as a result of indoctrination, which may not be far from the truth. Freedom means differently to the west; the ability to do whatever that they want without repercussions. For Eastern women, it is to behave themselves in ways that their religion sees fit so they'll be respected by men in their society. The humor in your scenario is that both will only see things from their perspective. Personally, everyone is free to do as they like but forcing others to accept their way of life is unacceptable. We may present our arguments but it up to each individuals to do what's best for them.


message 9: by [deleted user] (new)

Benarji wrote: "It is a matter of perspective and a mental block. When Eastern women look to the West, they think that women cheapen themselves for not restraining themselves in front of a man. It is a question of..."

I totally agree to you.


message 10: by Rida (new)

Rida Imran  (ridaimran) | 22 comments “When, as happened recently in France, an attempt is made to coerce women out of the burqa rather than creating a situation in which a woman can choose what she wishes to do, it’s not about liberating her, but about unclothing her. It becomes an act of humiliation and cultural imperialism. It’s not about the burqa. It’s about the coercion. Coercing a woman out of a burqa is as bad as coercing her into one. Viewing gender in this way, shorn of social, political and economic context, makes it an issue of identity, a battle of props and costumes. It is what allowed the US government to use western feminist groups as moral cover when it invaded Afghanistan in 2001. Afghan women were (and are) in terrible trouble under the Taliban. But dropping daisy-cutters on them was not going to solve their problems.”

― Arundhati Roy.

I'm a Muslim. I'm against forcing someone to wear a hijab. But so many of my Muslim sisters choose to wear themselves. And that's the beauty of it. When someone chooses something for themselves? How is it not feminism? If choose to wear a hijab it doesn't mean it's because of the patriarchy, I'd choose it myself. I think the problem lies in assuming that whoever is wearing a hijab has been forced to do so. That is obviously not the case.


message 11: by Julia (new)

Julia Boechat | 12 comments Ross wrote: "At school (I’m a curious 12 year old with a deep love for sarcasm) I’m studying ethics and beliefs and I’m studying feminism and I stand by it, I’ve stood by it all my life and the issues that femi..."

Hey, congratulations on being curious and asking hard questions at such an young age!
I think feminism, at least nowadays, is about choice. Women have to be empowered to be able to chose, and respected when they do. It means it doesn't matter much if you chose to wear a hijab or not, it matters if you were forced to wear it or if you decided not to do it because of xenophobic violence and stereotypes.
We see on the news women having their hijabs forcibly removed or being discriminated, seeing as oppressed and powerless, when they chose to wear it, and that's just another form of the patriarchy telling us what we can do with our bodies.
Like in the cartoon you mentioned, where both the bikini and the hijab can be seen as oppression, it's society telling us we are only deserving of respect and consideration if we follow a dress-code.
I believe that's the cartoon, right?

https://fabiusmaximus.files.wordpress...


message 12: by Rida (new)

Rida Imran  (ridaimran) | 22 comments Julia wrote: "Ross wrote: "At school (I’m a curious 12 year old with a deep love for sarcasm) I’m studying ethics and beliefs and I’m studying feminism and I stand by it, I’ve stood by it all my life and the iss..."

I love what yoi said!


message 13: by Julia (new)

Julia Boechat | 12 comments Rida wrote: "Julia wrote: "Ross wrote: "At school (I’m a curious 12 year old with a deep love for sarcasm) I’m studying ethics and beliefs and I’m studying feminism and I stand by it, I’ve stood by it all my li..."

Thanks, Rida, I'm glad.


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