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The Orphan Conspiracies: 29 Conspiracy Theories from The Orphan Trilogy
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DRUG WARS > (Profiting from) The War on Drugs

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message 1: by Lance, Group Founder (last edited Dec 29, 2016 08:16PM) (new) - rated it 5 stars

Lance Morcan | 2075 comments Excerpt from The Orphan Conspiracies: 29 Conspiracy Theories from The Orphan Trilogy:


The motivations for creating these drug wars, if indeed that’s what they are, is the massive profits the global elite can derive from their well-documented drug trafficking.

Which begs the question: why are drugs so profitable? Essentially, many argue, it’s because they are illegal. By making drugs a criminal enterprise, it creates an enormous black market economy where drugs fetch far greater prices than they would if legal.

Many authors and independent media outlets have repeatedly suggested the War on Drugs is a money-making scheme and doesn’t actually prevent drug usage or reduce the number of addicts. They point to countries like Portugal, the Netherlands and the Czech Republic, which have all decriminalized drug usage to varying degrees and have subsequently experienced a decrease in the amount of drug-related crime and a reduction in the incidence of drug addiction.

In an article dated January 23, 2014 and headed World leaders slam war on drugs as ‘a disaster’, CNBC comments that the “decades-long war on drugs has failed and the world’s lawmakers need to consider decriminalization”.

Former UN Secretary General Kofi Annan is quoted in the article as saying the War on Drugs “has been a disaster and has inflicted enormous harm … Drug use is not down. It’s time for a different approach. Drugs have destroyed many people, and the wrong government and policies have destroyed many people”.

Possibly interrelated to the theory that drugs are prohibited to fuel the highly profitable international drug trade, is the privatization of prisons that has occurred in America and throughout much of the Western world in recent decades. Something that started happening around the same time the War on Drugs began.

Privatized prisons could be viewed as an adjunct to the previous chapter, which covered secret prisons. In the West at least, these privately-owned, non-government facilities can’t be classified as secret prisons in that they are not off-the-grid or unknown to the government. However, according to conspiracy theorists, they are secretive in so far as they don’t disclose their true agendas.

Once prisons are privatized, they need prisoners to make a buck or they’ll go out of business. That’s the economic reality. Some critics of the privatized prisons business claim that it’s open to corruption and suggest that private companies running these prisons have been known to collaborate quietly with law enforcement officials to ensure their prisons are full of inmates.

The obvious candidates to target – after murderers, rapists and drug-pushers of course – are drug-users, according to those who promote this theory. If true, then the War on Drugs may also be a scam designed to put users in prison and keep them there.

Remember, it’s a fact that a large percentage of prisoners around the world have committed victimless crimes involving drugs. And like the War on Drugs itself, the privatized prison system is highly profitable.

Could it be this war and these privatized prisons are some kind of two-fold, money-making scheme of the elite? Or are we getting a bit paranoid here?

Russell Brand

“I’ve seen people I love die from this disease (drug addiction). Now we have a chance to at least demonstrate that this isn’t what people feel about this issue anymore … People don’t want drugs to be illegal anymore, they don’t want their heads of politicians buried in the sand.” –Russell Brand, from television interview on February 13, 2014 on the UK’s Channel 4.


The Orphan Conspiracies 29 Conspiracy Theories from The Orphan Trilogy by James Morcan


message 2: by Lance, Group Founder (new) - rated it 5 stars

Lance Morcan | 2075 comments I'd be interested to know what others in this group think of this theory that governments profit from ‘The War on Drugs’ because by making drugs illegal they drive up the prices and therefore exponentially increase profits that can be made off drugs.


message 3: by David (new)

David Elkin | 481 comments I have always thought Clancy hit the nail on the head in regard to drugs with his novel "Clear and Present Danger" Though it is a Clancy thriller, he touches on the topic you raise.

https://www.goodreads.com/book/show/3...


message 4: by James, Group Founder (last edited Sep 08, 2014 11:06PM) (new) - rated it 5 stars

James Morcan | 7965 comments So David, you believe the main motivation behind the government's 'War on Drugs' is more about turning drugs into a massive revenue stream (by making them illegal and therefore costly) rather than protecting children and civilians in general from the destructiveness of drug addiction?

Or am I putting words into your mouth? :)

Have never read Tom Clancy's Clear and Present Danger but watched the film adaptation years ago.

As more countries and states in America start to decriminalize and regulate some or all drugs, it's going to be interesting to see if society ends up better or worse off.
I don't pretend to know what the result will be, and am personally anti drug usage, but the worrying thing for me under the present system is currently there are millions of inmates locked up for drug possession only...And that is a victimless crime as they hurt nobody but themselves. This issue doesn't seem right as it's possibly turning drug addicts into hardened criminals by forcing them into the prison system.

So something needs to change, I vote.


message 5: by David (new)

David Elkin | 481 comments I don't believe the entire government is behind the profit concept. However, I think lethargy and bureaucratic indifference are a large part of the problem. Politics seems to get in the way, and since I live near the border, I see the hard work done by many in government so I will NEVER blame the foot soldiers. The movie concentrated on the action, but the book does a good job of looking at an issue that has no simple solutions.

The concern about turning users in criminals is well taken.


message 6: by James, Group Founder (new) - rated it 5 stars

James Morcan | 7965 comments I agree with what you say, David - I always tune out when hearing ideas that an entire government can ever be behind nefarious events or schemes. Splinter groups within governments, yes, but not an entire administration as there are always many good public servants within any government.


Harry Whitewolf | 1739 comments I watched a documentary recently about the clamp down of cocaine manufacture in Peru. Well, I say 'documentary' but I use the word in the loosest sense, what with its 'here's-the bad-guys music', flashing lights and what can only be described as a bad children's T.V presenter, but no, this wasn't Nikolodean.

Anyway, my point is, that it seems within some mainstream media we dumb down the whole thing into handy terms such as 'good' or 'bad' when the situation with drugs is so much more complex, on both a conspiratorial/business/political level, such as the above posts, or on a personal drug taking level. This is not a black and white subject.

I brought up the cocaine documentary because they didn't even mention once that there is a difference between cocaine and the coca plant, and by destroying the coca plant (as the U.S have done with gas from the air many times in Latin and South America) you are taking away the Peruvian's medicine and ritual; the non-cocaine coca leaves being medicinal and relieving altitude sickness. No mention at all in the Hey Kids! Drugs Are Bad! documentary. (Which of course, they can be bad, but that's not my point here.)

For anyone interested in my personal view on marijuana (to a characterised degree, you understand) see my blog for a short fictional piece called: YOUR OWN PERSONAL MEDICINE.

https://www.goodreads.com/author_blog...

Cheers.


message 8: by James, Group Founder (new) - rated it 5 stars

James Morcan | 7965 comments Is the War on Drugs slowly ending?
Seems like governments around the world decriminalizing various drugs (albeit in stages)


message 9: by Íris (new)

Íris (irissantos) I think the War on Drugs - even though the profits won't completely go to elitist headchiefs - is intimately connected to prisons.

No country in the world profits with prisons as much as US. I can't give much further information because I saw it somewhere a long time ago but it makes sense. Tax payers have to pay a huge load of money, even though they're not aware, to feed the prisons and all the business behind it. And some of those drugs make their round inside those same prisons.

Has anyone here watched Drugs Inc.? It conveys a lot the idea behind the war on drugs, how drugs are commercialized on the streets, in the prisons, how the drug cartels work, the hierarchy behind them, etc. Very enlightening.


message 10: by James, Group Founder (new) - rated it 5 stars

James Morcan | 7965 comments Íris wrote: "I think the War on Drugs - even though the profits won't completely go to elitist headchiefs - is intimately connected to prisons.

No country in the world profits with prisons as much as US. I can..."


Totally agree!


message 11: by Lance, Group Founder (new) - rated it 5 stars

Lance Morcan | 2075 comments Naim wrote: "Naim wrote: "I for one am a proponent of high quality drugs, not just in recreation but in medicine and spirituality.

The fact that marijuana and psychedelics are illegal is complete bogus. I have..."


Must pick you up on one point Naim..."If that guy was stoned, 1) it wouldn't have ever happened"... Unfortunately, many thousands of motor accident victims are killed and maimed every year by stoned drivers. Like drunk drivers, they're a deadly menace on our roads...as any ER nurse or doctor will attest.

As for people "eating heroic doses of mushrooms"...I have known such people from my youth and today they are truly nut cases.


message 12: by Laureen (new)

Laureen (laureenandersonswfcomau) | 478 comments I'm confused with all that's bring said here. My lonely opinion is that any form of addictive drug is a prescription for heartbreak, pain and guilt.

Naim has mentioned that she is a proponent of natural, high quality psychedelic drugs. My belief is that we don't need those accessories to induce a closeness with our inner being or origins. Many years ago, in the 70s, the age of Aquarius! I was doing my best to perfect meditation and practised daily Yoga. One day, during a meditation session, I received a vision that blew my mind. I have never questioned my purpose on this Earth or hankered for material success or notoriety ever since. I will not describe this vision because I believe it to be a personal sacred message.

I can not judge Naim's experiences as they are not mine, but I know that my experience was absolutely pure. I was not under the influence of any narcotic. If I had been under the influence, maybe I would have questioned its reality. I have no questions about that - it was most definitely not a dream. It changed my perception of the purpose of life.

I can remember a famous pop group (I won't mention names but you will no doubt know) who went to India to discover spirituality. I understand that they were heavily into drugs. I truly don't believe drugs bring us closer to reality. Everything we need is already within us. We have moments or years of self doubt but we all have the ability to recognise how important our personal role is on this earth. Each of us has a mission. So those who appear to be causing us grief, may in fact be encouraging us to question ourselves and helping us to find our true mission. Thou shalt not judge!

Addictive and mind altering drugs are a scourge on society. How many parents grieve for the children that succumb. The health cost of re-habilitation is enormous, and often unsuccessful. However, I agree that users should not be jailed but the suppliers should be, forever. Unforgiving, I know, and some, no doubt, could become model citizens but the seriousness of the crime of making money out of other people's misery is worse.

Alcohol is, indeed, highly destructive in large doses. But should the evils of this substance be used as an example for why we should legalise mind-altering drugs? Another story I have about the 70s is about a party of Uni students and tutors. How moronic these people became under the influence of drugs. Lots of giggling then a sort of non-verbal depressive state settled over everyone. I did not partake even though there were no hard drugs, just maijuana,

Years later, a number these highly talented students and teachers were paranoid and disfunctional. I do not wish to be critical. I could have easily been one of them. But to say that soft drugs are not harmful is not what I have seen or believe. I do think marijuana should be made legal for medical use as I believe it relieves suffering and pain but on prescription only.

Legalising illegal drugs is like legalising guns. Not a good idea, I think. There will be a black market when a product becomes illegal but it does keep the number down and the harm reduced. The more difficult it is for criminals to corrupt the innocent, the better our community will be. I am a firm believer in individuals taking responsibility for their own lives where at all possible. Sometimes it is not possible. When a mad gunman or a drug peddler enters our schools, they have no regard for the individual. They are either making a statement of dissatisfaction with their life or treatment or they are out to make money. Neither is a reason to take away someone's life and cause infinite grief for their families.

No doubt the perpetrators are in a pain of their own but if everybody in the world acted this way when they were distressed, we would have total anarchy.


message 13: by Lance, Group Founder (new) - rated it 5 stars

Lance Morcan | 2075 comments A group poll is currently running asking: Do you believe the War on Drugs is mostly being conducted to reduce the illegal drug trade or make drugs more profitable?

Have your say! https://www.goodreads.com/poll/show/1...


message 14: by James, Group Founder (new) - rated it 5 stars

James Morcan | 7965 comments Dark Alliance: The CIA, the Contras, and the Cocaine Explosion

Dark Alliance is a book that should be fiction, whose characters seem to come straight out of central casting: the international drug lord, Norwin Meneses; the Contra cocaine broker with an MBA in marketing, Danilo Blandon; and the illiterate teenager from the inner city who rises to become the king of crack, "Freeway" Ricky Ross. But unfortunately, these characters are real and their stories are true.

In August 1996, Pulitzer Prize-winning journalist Gary Webb stunned the world with a series of articles in the San Jose Mercury News reporting the results of his year-long investigation into the roots of the crack cocaine epidemic in America, specifically in Los Angeles. The series, titled "Dark Alliance," revealed that for the better part of a decade, a Bay Area drug ring sold tons of cocaine to Los Angeles street gangs and funneled millions in drug profits to the CIA-backed Nicaraguan Contras.

Gary Webb pushed his investigation even further in his book, Dark Alliance: The CIA, The Contras, and the Crack Cocaine Explosion. Drawing from then newly declassified documents, undercover DEA audio and videotapes that had never been publicly released, federal court testimony, and interviews, Webb demonstrates how our government knowingly allowed massive amounts of drugs and money to change hands at the expense of our communities.

Webb's original article spurred an immediate outcry. Within days of publication, both of California's senators made formal requests for investigations of the U.S. government's relationship with the cocaine ring. As a result, public demonstrations erupted in L.A., Washington D.C., and New York. Then-chief of the CIA, John Deutsch, made an unprecedented attempt at crisis control by going to South Central L.A. to hold a public forum. Representative Maxine Waters later said in George magazine, "I was shocked by the level of corruption and deceit and the way the intelligence agencies have knowledge of big-time drug dealing."
The allegations in Webb's story blazed over the Internet and the Mercury News' website on the series was deluged with hits—over a million in one day. A Columbia Journalism Review cover story called it "the most talked-about piece of journalism in 1996 and arguably the most famous—some would say infamous—set of articles of the decade."

Webb's own stranger-than-fiction experience is also woven into the book. His excoriation by the media—not because of any wrongdoing on his part, but by an insidious process of innuendo and suggestion that in effect blamed Webb for the implications of the story—had been all but predicted. Webb was warned off doing a CIA expose by a former Associated Press journalist who lost his job when, years before, he had stumbled onto the germ of the "Dark Alliance" story. And though Internal investigations by both the CIA and the Justice Department eventually vindicated Webb, he had by then been pushed out of the Mercury News and gone to work for the California State Legislature Task Force on Government Oversight. He died in 2004.

The updated paperback edition of Dark Alliance features revelations in just-released reports from the Department of Justice, internal CIA investigations, and a new cache of recently declassified secret FBI, DEA, and INS files—much of which was not known to Webb when writing the first edition of this book. Webb further explains the close working relationship that major drug traffickers had with U.S. Government agencies—particularly the DEA—and recounts the news of the past year regarding this breaking story.

After more than two years of career-damning allegations leveled at Webb, joined in the past year by glowing reviews of the hardcover edition of Dark Alliance from shore to shore, the core findings of this courageous investigative reporter's work—once fiercely denied—are becoming matters of public record. The updated paperback edition of Dark Alliance adds yet another layer of evidence exposing the illegality of a major CIA covert operation.

Dark Alliance The CIA, the Contras, and the Cocaine Explosion by Gary Webb


message 15: by James, Group Founder (last edited Jul 21, 2015 07:04AM) (new) - rated it 5 stars

James Morcan | 7965 comments A little birdie told me Gary Webb "committed suicide" (quotation marks from the little birdie, not me!) immediately after Dark Alliance: The CIA, the Contras, and the Cocaine Explosion was published...

Coincidence?
Ramblings of an insane little birdie?
Or evidence of something more sinister involving the silencing of whistle-blowers?


Kill the Messenger: How the CIA's Crack-Cocaine Controversy Destroyed Journalist Gary Webb

Kill the Messenger How the CIA's Crack-Cocaine Controversy Destroyed Journalist Gary Webb by Nick Schou

The Killing Game: The Writings of an Intrepid Investigative Reporter

The Killing Game The Writings of an Intrepid Investigative Reporter by Gary Webb


message 16: by Lance, Group Founder (new) - rated it 5 stars

Lance Morcan | 2075 comments The group poll which asked members "Do you believe the War on Drugs is mostly being conducted to reduce the illegal drug trade or make drugs more profitable?" is now complete.
Here are the results:

46.0% of members voted Make drugs more profitable
26.0% voted unsure
22.0% voted Reduce the illegal drug trade
6.0% voted I cannot say as I'm high right now and can't think!

To view the comments that occurred during the poll, check out:
https://www.goodreads.com/poll/show/1...


message 17: by James, Group Founder (last edited Aug 03, 2015 03:47AM) (new) - rated it 5 stars

James Morcan | 7965 comments British radio interview with Underground Knowledge member and former CIA/DEA agent John Banks -- Direct experiences with CIA drug trafficking & staged terrorism -- https://www.goodreads.com/videos/8806...

Great interview, John!


message 18: by John (new)

John Banks | 221 comments Hi James,
In response,
Irresponsible media reporting does nothing to help when it comes to exposing the truth. If a "whistleblower" can be proved to be exaggerating and not adhering to the truth, it destroys the credibility of what he/she is saying. I believe that only the truth, which at times is very hard for the public to accept, should be put out there.
I was a paratrooper, initially, a Pathfinder, then Special Patrols Company. I was never MI6, i certainly was involved with the security services though!
Just to straighten facts out! Tony Gosling certainly exaggerated the bio! At NO point did i state to Tony that i am an ex Colonel from the British Army, yes i did finish my service with the Directorate of Special Operations in South Africa as a Colonel.
I NEVER ran drugs with North, drugs were certainly part of what was going on in Honduras during the Contra affair but that was not North's main objective for being there. Yes it was certainly a method of funding the Contra's after Congress/Senate cut off funding for them.
Certainly the CIA are the worlds largest drug cartel and are definitely involved in assisting, funding, arming and training major terrorist groups when it suits their purpose such as currently the overthrow of the current Syrian government.

Let us all adhere rigidly to the truth to get it out there.
Thanks James.


message 19: by James, Group Founder (new) - rated it 5 stars

James Morcan | 7965 comments John wrote: "Hi James,
In response,
Irresponsible media reporting does nothing to help when it comes to exposing the truth. If a "whistleblower" can be proved to be exaggerating and not adhering to the truth, i..."


Okay, sorry, mate, I've now removed the MI6 reference. Maybe subconsciously I was enjoying the James Bond parallels! Ha.

And yeah, I figured Ollie North was more than just a CIA drug runner as his name seems to crop up EVERYWHERE in reported geopolitics of that era!

And I hope a bigger war isn't "engineered" in Syria. The Western powers should leave the poor people of the Middle East alone!


message 20: by John (new)

John Banks | 221 comments Hi James,
Wasn't your fault mate, Tony got a bit carried away with the bio!!
Its not just "6" that has spooks my friend!!

Ollie was highly active in many area's.

As for Syria, they will keep going until they get rid of bashar and install a puppet government. They cannot control Bashar and that really really annoys them!


message 21: by James, Group Founder (new) - rated it 5 stars

James Morcan | 7965 comments Does The CIA Control The International Drug Trade? https://www.goodreads.com/videos/1093...


message 22: by John (new)

John Banks | 221 comments James wrote: "Dark Alliance: The CIA, the Contras, and the Cocaine Explosion

Dark Alliance is a book that should be fiction, whose characters seem to come straight out of central casting: the inte..."

Not only Dark Alliance, and regarding Gary's "suicide", if a person can shoot themselves TWICE in the back of the head, then yes it may have been suicide, highly unlikely though!!
A brilliant book with multiple cross references into other sites/books/reports on the CIA and its use of narcotics, both in tests on unwitting American citizens, to its smuggling of drugs/giving clearance to drug smugglers, to using drug cartels for their own purposes over many many years as early as 1945 and still ongoing is "Whiteout, CIA, Drugs and the Press" a must read for anyone interested in the subject!
Have a great day to all!


message 24: by James, Group Founder (new) - rated it 5 stars

James Morcan | 7965 comments John wrote: "Not only Dark Alliance, and regarding Gary's "suicide", if a person can shoot themselves TWICE in the back of the head, then yes it may have been suicide, highly unlikely though!!..."

Thanks John, hope you're doing well, mate.
Best,
James


message 25: by James, Group Founder (new) - rated it 5 stars

James Morcan | 7965 comments Chasing the Scream: The First and Last Days of the War on Drugs by Johann Hari is a Goodreads Choice Awards Nominee in Best Nonfiction.

It is now one hundred years since drugs were first banned in the United States. On the eve of this centenary, journalist Johann Hari set off on an epic three-year, thirty-thousand-mile journey into the war on drugs. What he found is that more and more people all over the world have begun to recognize three startling truths: Drugs are not what we think they are. Addiction is not what we think it is. And the drug war has very different motives to the ones we have seen on our TV screens for so long.

In Chasing the Scream, Hari reveals his discoveries entirely through the stories of people across the world whose lives have been transformed by this war. They range from a transsexual crack dealer in Brooklyn searching for her mother, to a teenage hit-man in Mexico searching for a way out. It begins with Hari's discovery that at the birth of the drug war, Billie Holiday was stalked and killed by the man who launched this crusade--and it ends with the story of a brave doctor who has led his country to decriminalize every drug, from cannabis to crack, with remarkable results.

Chasing the Scream lays bare what we really have been chasing in our century of drug war--in our hunger for drugs, and in our attempt to destroy them. This book will challenge and change how you think about one of the most controversial--and consequential--questions of our time.

Chasing the Scream The First and Last Days of the War on Drugs by Johann Hari


message 27: by James, Group Founder (new) - rated it 5 stars

James Morcan | 7965 comments “Prison is for rapists, thieves, and murderers. If you lock someone up for smoking a plant that makes them happy, then you're the fucking criminal.”
Joe Rogan


message 28: by John (last edited Nov 20, 2017 05:31PM) (new)

John Wilson | 154 comments “Prison is for rapists, thieves, and murderers. If you lock someone up for smoking a plant that makes them happy, then you're the fucking criminal.”
―Joe Rogan


The ruling classes have a vested interest in outlawing alternative states of comprehension. (Not strictly relevant, but worth a thought.)


message 29: by James, Group Founder (new) - rated it 5 stars

James Morcan | 7965 comments Good thought, cobber! :)
"They" don't want us getting too many bright ideas on our reality, do they?


message 30: by John (new)

John Wilson | 154 comments Okay, but what about the children of the bourgeoisie who smoke dope? (Hardly a revolutionary substance these days.)


message 31: by Lance, Group Founder (new) - rated it 5 stars

Lance Morcan | 2075 comments The Spoils of War: Afghanistan’s Multibillion Dollar Heroin Trade

Washington's Hidden Agenda: Restore the Drug Trade

By Prof Michel Chossudovsky
Global Research, November 10, 2017

https://www.globalresearch.ca/the-spo...


message 32: by James, Group Founder (new) - rated it 5 stars

James Morcan | 7965 comments Drug Wars, Missing Money, and a Phantom $500 Million https://www.commondreams.org/views/20...#
Pentagon watchdog calls out two commands for financial malfeasance.


Science (Fiction) Comedy Horror and Fantasy Geek/Nerd (ScienceFictionComedyetcGeekNerd) | 13 comments An alternative to the war on drugs would be this:

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ao8L-...

In a dream.


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