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Determination Lists & Challenges > Samanta's 2019 Determination List

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message 1: by Samanta (last edited Dec 30, 2019 12:38AM) (new)


message 2: by madrano (new)

madrano | 9742 comments It appears you have quite an active reading year ahead, Samanta. I notice both you and AliasReader have Sapiens on your list. I'll be eager to read your comments on it. Good luck with your 2019 DL!


message 3: by Samanta (new)

Samanta   (almacubana) | 189 comments Thank you! I definitely plan to take books off this list this year. I made a one-author challenge in another group and put Diana Gabaldon on it. I'll also put J.K.Rowling. We'll see if Anne Rice will meet the same fate this year.


message 4: by madrano (new)

madrano | 9742 comments Clever idea. I've never read Anne Rice but she did go to my high school, graduating the year before i arrived. My mother kept telling me i knew her but, alas, not so. We've walked by her home in New Orleans, too, although i believe she no longer lives in the city. ANYway good luck with all three series!


message 5: by Alias Reader (last edited Jan 16, 2019 06:20PM) (new)

Alias Reader (aliasreader) | 17158 comments madrano wrote: "It appears you have quite an active reading year ahead, Samanta. I notice both you and AliasReader have Sapiens on your list. I'll be eager to read your comments on it. Good luck with your 2019 DL!"

I purchased it in hardcover when it first came out. I wish I had waited on purchased the paperback as the hardcover is too heavy to carry on the subway.


message 6: by madrano (new)

madrano | 9742 comments I'll bet! The length is why it's on my TBR, rather than in my hands. I'm already immersed in two long books and am wondering how long they'll take me.


message 7: by Samanta (new)

Samanta   (almacubana) | 189 comments I have the paperback version.


message 8: by madrano (new)

madrano | 9742 comments It sounds as though the lack of heft will be useful if you travel with it, Samanta.


message 9: by Samanta (new)

Samanta   (almacubana) | 189 comments Harry Potter and the Goblet of Fire (Harry Potter, #4) by J.K. Rowling by J.K. Rowling J.K. Rowling
Finish Date: 07.04.2019.
Genre: Fantasy
Rating: A-
Review: This one is the first very long one and parts of it were a bit boring, but the tournament and the and were great so it's A-.


message 10: by madrano (new)

madrano | 9742 comments This is the only one of the series i tried to read. It was interesting yet i just couldn't engage, so stopped reading. And, to be honest, i only watched the first of the filmed series, too. I'm not sure why i didn't "click" with it, as i'm usually attracted to that sort.

ANYway, continued success with the rest in the series, i'm sure they were better once she'd introduced readers to most of the characters and the school/setting itself. Enjoy!


message 11: by Samanta (new)

Samanta   (almacubana) | 189 comments To me, they are great, but the last three are, in my opinion, the best ones because the characters are older and more relatable. The first book is magical, though (pun intended), because you are introduced to the world.


message 12: by madrano (new)

madrano | 9742 comments I can see the fun in the first book. We've been seeing more & more tv advertising for the Orlando themed park that features the series. The people we know who have been there absolutely loved it--and none of them was under 25!!


message 13: by Samanta (new)

Samanta   (almacubana) | 189 comments It's because Harry Potter can be for all ages. :)


message 14: by madrano (new)

madrano | 9742 comments So it appears. Honestly, i was surprised.


message 15: by Samanta (new)

Samanta   (almacubana) | 189 comments Harry Potter and the Order of the Phoenix (Harry Potter, #5) by J.K. Rowling by J.K. Rowling J.K. Rowling
Finish Date: 29.12.2019.
Genre: Fantasy
Rating: A
Review: The longest and the most challenging books of the seven originally written, not because of its length but because of the main antagonist. You might think it's Voldemort, the famous dark wizard who almost killed Harry Potter 14 years ago (in this book), but NO!, it's a conceited little witch by the name of Dolores Umbridge. I honestly think she is more evil than Voldemort himself. Reading the book, I was thinking about her upbringing and what might have happened to her to become like that, but by the end of the book I honestly didn't even care. She made me have anxiety attacks just reading the book (which is fiction!). This is my second time reading this book and I remember having the same feelings the first time which made me constantly postpone reading this book and when I finally did start, it took me very long (for my standards with Harry Potter) to finish it.


message 16: by madrano (new)

madrano | 9742 comments Samanta, i’m the sort who gets anxiety reading fiction, too. Knowing it isn’t “real” doesn’t help. That you reread it surprises me—i’d try to protect myself! LOL Well done.


message 17: by Samanta (new)

Samanta   (almacubana) | 189 comments I guess my love for Harry Potter is larger than my Dolores-Umbridge-induced anxiety attacks. :D :D


message 18: by Alias Reader (last edited Dec 30, 2019 10:10AM) (new)

Alias Reader (aliasreader) | 17158 comments madrano wrote: "Samanta, i’m the sort who gets anxiety reading fiction, too. ."

For me, well done fiction erases the line between fiction and reality.

Speaking of anxiety, I've enjoyed the Stephen King books I've read. I especially liked his earlier books. That said, his new book gave me anxiety just reading the description for some reason. I honestly don't know if I can read it. It doesn't help that I usually read before I go to bed.

The Institute
In the middle of the night, in a house on a quiet street in suburban Minneapolis, intruders silently murder Luke Ellis’s parents and load him into a black SUV. The operation takes less than two minutes. Luke will wake up at The Institute, in a room that looks just like his own, except there’s no window. And outside his door are other doors, behind which are other kids with special talents—telekinesis and telepathy—who got to this place the same way Luke did: Kalisha, Nick, George, Iris, and ten-year-old Avery Dixon. They are all in Front Half. Others, Luke learns, graduated to Back Half, “like the roach motel,” Kalisha says. “You check in, but you don’t check out.”

In this most sinister of institutions, the director, Mrs. Sigsby, and her staff are ruthlessly dedicated to extracting from these children the force of their extranormal gifts. There are no scruples here. If you go along, you get tokens for the vending machines. If you don’t, punishment is brutal. As each new victim disappears to Back Half, Luke becomes more and more desperate to get out and get help. But no one has ever escaped from the Institute.

As psychically terrifying as Firestarter, and with the spectacular kid power of It, The Institute is Stephen King’s gut-wrenchingly dramatic story of good vs. evil in a world where the good guys don’t always win.


message 19: by madrano (last edited Dec 31, 2019 01:34PM) (new)

madrano | 9742 comments Perfect example of why i could not read such a book. I’d be anxious on many levels—the crime survivor himself, the institute’s plans and the loss of other children. Nope. No way. Ever.


message 20: by Samanta (new)

Samanta   (almacubana) | 189 comments Alias Reader wrote: "“You check in, but you don’t check out.”"

This reminded me of Hotel California by Eagles.

Also, the premise of the story reminded me a bit of what the Magisterium was doing to children in His Dark Materials series by Philip Pullman.


message 21: by madrano (new)

madrano | 9742 comments Interesting thought, Samanta. That is on my to read list but i have yet to begin. Now I see it’s an HBO series.


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