Reading Through the Ages discussion

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Americas’ Early Settlement

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message 1: by Melanie (last edited Dec 18, 2018 12:05AM) (new)

Melanie | 285 comments Mod
You can interpret this in any form you want. As you can tell, it says Americas, which means that you can read books for both North and South America during the time when the first European settlers arrive or even any books you can find of earlier settlements as e.g. the Vikings.

Book list here: https://www.goodreads.com/group/books...

Share as always any books you have read or will read.


message 2: by Regina (new)

Regina Lemoine I think I will read either The Moor's Account or The Sot-Weed Factor for this one.


message 3: by Melinda (new)

Melinda One Thousand White Women: The Journals of May Dodd is definitely going to be the read for this category.


message 4: by Sharon (new)

Sharon Goforth Hope Leslie: or, Early Times in the Massachusetts Catharine Maria Sedgwick
My selection for Americas’ Early Settlement.


message 5: by Melanie (new)

Melanie | 285 comments Mod
Regina wrote: "I think I will read either The Moor's Account or The Sot-Weed Factor for this one."

Been meaning to read the Sot-Weed Factor for years. Added both your books to the shelf


message 6: by Melanie (new)

Melanie | 285 comments Mod
Melinda wrote: "One Thousand White Women: The Journals of May Dodd is definitely going to be the read for this category."

Excellent choice and this has been a popular book in the last couple of years. Added to bookshelf


message 7: by Melanie (new)

Melanie | 285 comments Mod
Sharon wrote: "Hope Leslie: or, Early Times in the Massachusetts Catharine Maria Sedgwick
My selection for Americas’ Early Settlement."


I never even heard of this book! That's why I am loving this already.

Added to bookshelf.


message 8: by Natalie (new)

Natalie  | 5 comments Melinda wrote: "One Thousand White Women: The Journals of May Dodd is definitely going to be the read for this category."

I have this book! But completely forgot about it. Might pick it up for this prompt. Thank you for mentioning it.


message 9: by Anja (new)

Anja | 9 comments Does "Winnetou" count as early settlement? :-D
I am going to re-read "Winnetou und der Detektiv".


message 10: by Melanie (new)

Melanie | 285 comments Mod
Gobelina wrote: "Does "Winnetou" count as early settlement? :-D
I am going to re-read "Winnetou und der Detektiv"."


You can totally make that work :)


message 11: by Regina (last edited Jan 06, 2019 09:27AM) (new)

Regina Lemoine I just watched Mel’s double dipping video and I’ve started The Moor’s Account. This book also works for pre-1800 Africa. The narrative is divided between America and Morocco and is set in the early 16th century. For anyone doing Popsugar, it fulfills the novel based on a true story prompt, too.

For the Reading Women challenge, it could fit for a religion other than your own, provided that the protagonist can be male. The main character is Muslim.


message 12: by Amy (last edited Jan 06, 2019 10:33AM) (new)

Amy (awwolfe) | 2 comments I realize that this category is somewhat open ended, but when does "early" become "later"? In regards to the US, when would you consider this time period ending? Would it be the end of the 17th century, or perhaps the early part of the 18th century?
For the 17th c. I would recommend Arthur Miller's play The Crucible. Set in 1692 during the Salem witch trials it is a brilliant work.
I also have to mention one of my favorite girlhood books The Witch of Blackbird Pond. Set in 1687, Kit Tyler leaves Barbados and travels to a strict Puritan community in Connecticut There she befriends an elderly women thought by many to be a witch. While this is a middle-grade book, I know many would enjoy it.
In the period at the begining of the 18th c. there is a much wider selection of books including James Fenimore Cooper's The Deerslayer and The Last of the Mohicans. While these might be pushing it somewhat, they are set on the "frontier" which is ever moving westward.
Some other books which I have not read but have heard good things about include:
Caleb's Crossing
Flight of the Sparrow
My Name Is Resolute
City of Dreams: A Novel of Nieuw Amsterdam and Early Manhattan
The Winthrop Woman
I imagine there must be some interesting Canadian books, as well as those from Central and South America and the Caribbean. I'd love some suggestions.


message 13: by Melanie (new)

Melanie | 285 comments Mod
Regina wrote: "I just watched Mel’s double dipping video and I’ve started The Moor’s Account. This book also works for pre-1800 Africa. The narrative is divided between America and Morocco and is set in the early..."

Ah I see, you are getting in the spirit of things Regina :)


message 14: by Melanie (new)

Melanie | 285 comments Mod
Amy wrote: "I realize that this category is somewhat open ended, but when does "early" become "later"? In regards to the US, when would you consider this time period ending? Would it be the end of the 17th cen..."

There is a lot of room for interpretation - quite deliberately so - in order to give people the opportunity to a) for more choice and b) read several books should they choose to do so from various country.

As for time period, the American West was not settled until the 19th century really.

I think the guiding principle should be: If it works for you, it works.


message 15: by Susan (new)

Susan | 5 comments For this category I hope to read Golden Hill and the Winthrop Woman and possibly the Moor's Account - Think they fit the overall parameters. My goal on all these challenges is to try and work with my existing TBR - but since I am a bit of a book tart that might change!


message 16: by Judy (new)

Judy | 2 comments Melanie wrote: "Amy wrote: "I realize that this category is somewhat open ended, but when does "early" become "later"? In regards to the US, when would you consider this time period ending? Would it be the end of ..."

Amy wrote: "I realize that this category is somewhat open ended, but when does "early" become "later"? In regards to the US, when would you consider this time period ending? Would it be the end of the 17th cen..."

I am reading Caleb's Crossing for this part of the challenge-takes place around 1660. Would love to read The Witch of Blackbird Pond again-it's been such a long time.


message 17: by Amy (new)

Amy (awwolfe) | 2 comments Melanie wrote: "Amy wrote: "I realize that this category is somewhat open ended, but when does "early" become "later"? In regards to the US, when would you consider this time period ending? Would it be the end of ..."

Hi Mel, I think you misunderstood. America's frontiers began just beyond the Atlantic coast. The Deerslayer is set in the wilderness of central New York (not yet a state) in the 1740s which was at the time the frontier (or rather, one of them). I just thought it was pushing it because it's not exactly the first settlement of the continent, but certainly was the first settlement of the region. And then there are all the other frontiers: French Louisiana (and Canada), the Spanish southwest, etc.. So many possibilities!


message 18: by Jill (new)

Jill (jillglove) | 10 comments I’m surprised Willa Cather hasn’t been mentioned,

I’d start with O Pioneer!


message 19: by Karen Michele (new)

Karen Michele Burns (klibrary) I am reading two books together, The Orenda by Joseph Boyden and Fathers and Crows by William T. Vollmann, both about the Jesuits and natives of Canada an northern New York in the 1600s. I plan to use one of them in this spot.


message 20: by Melanie (new)

Melanie | 285 comments Mod
Jill wrote: "I’m surprised Willa Cather hasn’t been mentioned,

I’d start with O Pioneer!"


Maybe because it's technically not historical fiction? Naturally, you can read it, we say you can interpret the challenges as you want. But since the books by Cather are set at the beginning of the 20th century and she wrote them in 1913, they are really contemporary fiction of their time period. However, totally cool to pick this up. Quite a few people read classics to interpret the prompts.


message 21: by Melanie (new)

Melanie | 285 comments Mod
Karen Michele wrote: "I am reading two books together, The Orenda by Joseph Boyden and Fathers and Crows by William T. Vollmann, both about the Jesuits and nat..."

Oh the Vollmann books sounds interesting.


message 22: by Regina (new)

Regina Lemoine I finished The Moor's Account for this category.

My review:

3 stars

The first half of this novel is very good. By the halfway point, however, I found my interest flagging. The last ninety or so pages were a slog. I agree with other reviewers who have pointed out the anachronistic attitudes of Mustafa (Esteban). By the end of the novel his character seems to be little more than a mouthpiece for the author.

I still think it is worth reading for anyone interested in the Spanish conquest. I bought Cabeza de Vaca’s account on Kindle and I plan to get A Land So Strange: The Epic Journey of Cabeza de Vaca for further reading.


message 23: by Melanie (new)

Melanie | 285 comments Mod
Regina wrote: "I finished The Moor's Account for this category.

My review:

3 stars

The first half of this novel is very good. By the halfway point, however, I found my interest flagging. The l..."


Interesting thoughts and seems to chime with a lot of the things I heard about the book, that it is a book of two halves.


message 24: by Victoria (new)

Victoria (Eve's Alexandria) | 26 comments Mod
I would definitely recommend Golden Hill by Francis Spufford for this one, although it’s not the ‘earliest’ settlement, it’s still pretty early 😀 I didn’t love it myself but Barkskins by Annie Proulx would also fit well - although it ends up in the early 21st century it starts in the early 17th century and ranges across the incremental stages of North American white settlement.

I think I’m going to read The Orenda by Joseph Borden for this category.


message 25: by Liz (new)

Liz (lschubert) | 7 comments Just finished True Grit by Charles Portis. A quick read (200 pgs) if anyone is looking for something in this category. I read the 50th Anniversary edition which has an afterword by Donna Tartt which I also enjoyed.


message 26: by Melanie (new)

Melanie | 285 comments Mod
Liz wrote: "Just finished True Grit by Charles Portis. A quick read (200 pgs) if anyone is looking for something in this category. I read the 50th Anniversary edition which has an afterword by Donna Tartt whic..."

My husband loves this book. Like LOVE.


message 27: by Melanie (new)

Melanie | 285 comments Mod
Victoria wrote: "I would definitely recommend Golden Hill by Francis Spufford for this one, although it’s not the ‘earliest’ settlement, it’s still pretty early 😀 I didn’t love it myself but Barkskins by Annie Prou..."

Yes Golden Hill would definitely fit.


message 28: by Kate (new)

Kate Howe | 9 comments I just finished The Witch of Blackbird Pond by Elizabeth George Speare and thoroughly enjoyed it! It was very character driven. I realized this is a setting that I really love for historical fiction along with the American Civil War. It has spurred me on to read more in this category so before moving on I’ll be reading The Birch Bark House by Louise Erdrich and The Sign of the Beaver by Elizabeth George Speare to get a picture of the Native American experience.


message 29: by Melanie (new)

Melanie | 285 comments Mod
Kate wrote: "I just finished The Witch of Blackbird Pond by Elizabeth George Speare and thoroughly enjoyed it! It was very character driven. I realized this is a setting that I really love for historical fictio..."

added all of these to the bookshelf, thanks Kate


message 30: by Ruth Ann (new)

Ruth Ann (moodygrl00) I just finished One Thousand White Women by Jim Fergus which I enjoyed. This would also fit the alternate history prompt if anyone wants to double dip.


message 31: by Melanie (new)

Melanie | 285 comments Mod
Ruth Ann wrote: "I just finished One Thousand White Women by Jim Fergus which I enjoyed. This would also fit the alternate history prompt if anyone wants to double dip."

Oh, I had no idea this is alternate history.


message 32: by Nic (new)

Nic (bibliolicious_reads) | 24 comments Just finished reading Clare Clark's Savage Lands for this category. I think this link to my very brief non-spoilery review should work. In even briefer form: I enjoyed it, very much.


message 33: by Bonnie (new)

Bonnie (bonnie_poole) | 32 comments So many great suggestions for this category! My ancestors came to America on The Mayflower, so I will be looking for a book on this topic. If anyone has read a good book about this voyage, do let me know. Plus I hope to read many other books suggested here.


message 34: by Bonnie (new)

Bonnie (bonnie_poole) | 32 comments DEAR AMERICA, A JOURNEY TO THE NEW WORLD, THE DIARY OF REMEMBER PATIENCE WHIPPLE, MAYFLOWER 1620 by Kathryn Lasky

Hopefully this will qualify as I already have the book. It’s written from the POV of a young girl writing in her diary as they travel from Leyden to America on the Mayflower and their life in the new land.


message 35: by Areta (new)

Areta Bohacz may | 7 comments The Orenda has been on my WTR list for ages. I have also been wanting to reread The Witch of Blackbird Pond for some time now. Ill need to decide and add these to my April pile as my March TBR pile is full. WOW!


message 36: by Karen Michele (new)

Karen Michele Burns (klibrary) I just finished my monster book for this category, Fathers and Crows by William T. Vollmann!


message 37: by Jo (new)

Jo | 1 comments West by Carys Davies seems as though it would be a good one for this category, it’s a great read and short if you get to the end of the year and haven’t met this prompt yet! Am I right in thinking it would qualify?


message 38: by Bonnie (new)

Bonnie (bonnie_poole) | 32 comments Thats a good idea Jo. “West” sounds like a good book to read for this prompt. Do let us know if it qualifies.


message 39: by Melanie (new)

Melanie | 285 comments Mod
Bonnie wrote: "DEAR AMERICA, A JOURNEY TO THE NEW WORLD, THE DIARY OF REMEMBER PATIENCE WHIPPLE, MAYFLOWER 1620 by Kathryn Lasky

Hopefully this will qualify as I already have the book. It’s written from the POV ..."

Definitely qualifies


message 40: by Melanie (new)

Melanie | 285 comments Mod
Areta wrote: "The Orenda has been on my WTR list for ages. I have also been wanting to reread The Witch of Blackbird Pond for some time now. Ill need to decide and add these to my April pile as my March TBR pile..."

Yep, a familiar situation with TBR piles ;)


message 41: by Melanie (new)

Melanie | 285 comments Mod
Karen Michele wrote: "I just finished my monster book for this category, Fathers and Crows by William T. Vollmann!"

Wow, Monster indeed (needs a capital, that book is a nearly a person). Well done


message 42: by Melanie (new)

Melanie | 285 comments Mod
Jo wrote: "West by Carys Davies seems as though it would be a good one for this category, it’s a great read and short if you get to the end of the year and haven’t met this prompt yet! Am I right in thinking ..."

Sounds like it would :) So many people love this one


message 43: by Britta (new)

Britta Böhler I think I will go with The Winthrop Woman for this one. You cant go wrong with Anya Seton :-)


message 44: by Melanie (new)

Melanie | 285 comments Mod
Britta wrote: "I think I will go with The Winthrop Woman for this one. You cant go wrong with Anya Seton :-)"

oooh, interesting :)


message 45: by Amanda (new)

Amanda Lavelle | 13 comments Is 1788 too late for this? I've found a book called Loyalists Daughter about a family fleeing to Canada and encountering Native Indians etc on the way xx


message 46: by Alicia (new)

Alicia | 7 comments I read The Quick and the Dead by Louis L'Amour.


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