Reading Through the Ages discussion

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Russia after the Revolution

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message 1: by Melanie (last edited Dec 18, 2018 12:32AM) (new)

Melanie | 285 comments Mod
Russia is just fascinating, especially the stark contrast of before and after the revolution and thus, we have both time periods.

For inspiration, check the bookshelf: https://www.goodreads.com/group/books...

And share and recommend any books you may have liked.


message 2: by Shaun (Lost in Books, Film, and Floss) (last edited Dec 31, 2018 01:43PM) (new)

Shaun  (Lost in Books, Film, and Floss) | 5 comments Think I might use Child 44 by Tom Rob Smith if I get to this category.

Child 44 (Leo Demidov, #1) by Tom Rob Smith


message 3: by Melanie (new)

Melanie | 285 comments Mod
Shaun (Eclectic Reads) wrote: "Think I might use Child 44 by Tom Rob Smith if I get to this category.

Child 44 (Leo Demidov, #1) by Tom Rob Smith"


This was very popular a few years ago, good pick.


message 4: by Melinda (new)

Melinda Child 44 is an excellent book. I actually felt like I was there, the author wrote descriptions so well.


message 5: by Susan (new)

Susan | 5 comments My current thoughts for this challenge include Russian Winter and the Revolution of Marina M. They have been on my TBR for a while and winter seems like the perfect time to read them.


message 6: by Shaun (new)

Shaun (sturnerstuff) | 15 comments Thinking I might pick up The Vanishing Futurist in this category.


message 7: by Shaun (new)

Shaun (sturnerstuff) | 15 comments The Siege would also fit here, if you don't mind your historical fiction bleak and harrowing


message 8: by Melanie (new)

Melanie | 285 comments Mod
Shaun wrote: "The Siege would also fit here, if you don't mind your historical fiction bleak and harrowing"

Shaun wrote: "Thinking I might pick up The Vanishing Futurist in this category."

Both books would fit well, but yeah the Siege is too harrowing for me.


message 9: by Melanie (new)

Melanie | 285 comments Mod
Susan wrote: "My current thoughts for this challenge include Russian Winter and the Revolution of Marina M. They have been on my TBR for a while and winter seems like the perfect time to read them."

Good choices


message 10: by Valerie (new)

Valerie (valroos) I am reading Andrei Makine's Requiem for a Lost Empire for this prompt. I absolutely love this writer so I have great hopes for the book.


message 11: by Karen Michele (new)

Karen Michele Burns (klibrary) Valerie wrote: "I am reading Andrei Makine's Requiem for a Lost Empire for this prompt. I absolutely love this writer so I have great hopes for the book."

Does the trilogy need to be read in order?


message 12: by Valerie (new)

Valerie (valroos) Karen Michele wrote: "Valerie wrote: "I am reading Andrei Makine's Requiem for a Lost Empire for this prompt. I absolutely love this writer so I have great hopes for the book."

Does the trilogy need to be..."


No, you can read them completely separate from each other.


message 13: by Bonnie (new)

Bonnie (bonnie_poole) | 32 comments Would I WAS ANASTASIA by Ariel Lawhon fit for this prompt?

Here is the summary:
In an enthralling new feat of historical suspense, Ariel Lawhon unravels the extraordinary twists and turns in Anna Anderson's 50-year battle to be recognized as Anastasia Romanov. Is she the Russian Grand Duchess or the thief of another woman's legacy? Countless others have rendered their verdict. Now it is your turn.

Russia, July 17, 1918: Under direct orders from Vladimir Lenin, Bolshevik secret police force Anastasia Romanov, along with the entire imperial family, into a damp basement in Siberia where they face a merciless firing squad. None survive. At least that is what the executioners have always claimed.

Germany, February 17, 1920: A young woman bearing an uncanny resemblance to Anastasia Romanov is pulled shivering and senseless from a canal in Berlin. Refusing to explain her presence in the freezing water, she is taken to the hospital where an examination reveals that her body is riddled with countless, horrific scars. When she finally does speak, this frightened, mysterious woman claims to be the Russian Grand Duchess Anastasia.

Her detractors, convinced that the young woman is only after the immense Romanov fortune, insist on calling her by a different name: Anna Anderson.

As rumors begin to circulate through European society that the youngest Romanov daughter has survived the massacre, old enemies and new threats are awakened. With a brilliantly crafted dual narrative structure, Lawhon wades into the most psychologically complex and emotionally compelling territory yet: the nature of identity itself.

The question of who Anna Anderson is and what actually happened to Anastasia Romanov creates a saga that spans fifty years and touches three continents. This thrilling story is every bit as moving and momentous as it is harrowing and twisted.

About the Author
ARIEL LAWHON is a critically acclaimed author of historical fiction. Her books have been translated into numerous languages and have been Library Reads, One Book One County, and Book of the Month Club selections. She is the co-founder of SheReads.org and lives in the rolling hills outside Nashville, Tennessee, with her husband, four sons, black Lab, and a deranged cat. She splits her time between the grocery store and the baseball field.


Natalie (CuriousReader) (curiousreaderr) | 1 comments Bonnie wrote: "Would I WAS ANASTASIA by Ariel Lawhon fit for this prompt?

Here is the summary:
In an enthralling new feat of historical suspense, Ariel Lawhon unravels the extraordinary twists and turns in Anna..."


I was just planning to write that I chose this book for the prompt, at least Anastasia's timeline definitely deal with Russia after the revolution. I really liked it!


message 15: by Bonnie (new)

Bonnie (bonnie_poole) | 32 comments Thank you so much Natalie (Curious Reader) for letting me know your thoughts about I WAS ANASTASIA and that you liked it. I’m glad to hear it qualifies as this is the book I would most like to read for this prompt too. I look forward to reading it too! Ps. I’m a subscriber to your youtube channel and enjoy your talks and book recommendations very much.


message 16: by Areta (new)

Areta Bohacz may | 7 comments I Was Anastasia is on my TBR March pile! I just found this group today while I am finishing Once Upon a River by Diane Setterfield. I am looking forward to expanding my reading horizons!


message 17: by Melanie (new)

Melanie | 285 comments Mod
I Was Anastasia is certainly a popular choice :)


message 18: by Sandy (new)

Sandy (sanpaj) | 3 comments Shaun (Eclectic Reads) wrote: "Think I might use Child 44 by Tom Rob Smith if I get to this category.

Child 44 (Leo Demidov, #1) by Tom Rob Smith"


Melanie wrote: "Shaun (Eclectic Reads) wrote: "Think I might use Child 44 by Tom Rob Smith if I get to this category.

Child 44 (Leo Demidov, #1) by Tom Rob Smith"

This was very popular a few years ago, good pick."


There are also 3 other books in this series after Child 44..


message 19: by Melanie (new)

Melanie | 285 comments Mod
A suggestion video Russia After the Revolution


message 20: by Britta (last edited May 24, 2019 01:23PM) (new)

Britta Böhler I can recommend The Big Green Tent b Lyudmila Ulitskaya about post-Stalin Russia and The Patriots by Sana Krasikov, a multigenerational saga from the 1930ies until after the fall of the wall.


message 21: by Amanda (new)

Amanda Lavelle | 13 comments I read A gentleman in Moscow by Amor Towles for this prompt. I liked it but it suffered a bit of the hyped book syndrome for me- I was expecting it to blow me away and it was just ok xx


message 22: by Nic (last edited Jul 22, 2019 06:50AM) (new)

Nic (bibliolicious_reads) | 24 comments I read Gillian Slovo's Ice Road for this category, last month. It was fine: some interesting characters, but the prose was forgettable and it was over-long for the story it was telling. There are several Russian novels on this period (both contemporary with events, and ones taking a historical perspective) that I've preferred in the past, like Platonov's The Foundation Pit.


message 23: by Sanne (new)

Sanne (sanneennas) question: does the fiction have to be about Russia proper? What about countries that once belonged to the Soviet Union?

I'm trying to do this challenge with books that are already on my shelves, and I recently read The Devils' Dance by Hamid Ismailov, which is a novel set in 19th century and 1930's Uzbekistan - the vast majority of the novel is set in Soviet-occupied Uzbekistan.


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