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2019 Quest for Women Authors > Leni's 2019 Women on the Shelf

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message 1: by Leni (last edited Oct 14, 2019 02:10PM) (new)

Leni Iversen (leniverse) | 1183 comments I promised myself to go lighter on the challenges for 2019, so I'm only doing the Century and I'll use books I already have on my bookshelves. Here goes:

1900s C.M. Montgomery: Anne of Avonlea (1909) ****
1910s Charlotte Perkins Gilman: The Herland Trilogy: Moving the Mountain, Herland, with Her in Ourland
1920s Dorothy L Sayers Clouds of Witness (1926)****
1930s
1940s Agatha Christie The Body in the Library (1942)****
1950s Daphne du Maurier My Cousin Rachel (1951) Simone de Beauvoir The Mandarins (1954)*****
1960s Jean Rhys Wide Sargasso Sea (1966)****
1970s Elsa Morante Historien(1974)
1980s I. Grekova The Ship of Widows
1990s Octavia Butler Parable of the Sower Angela Carter: Wise Children (1991)****


message 2: by Leni (new)

Leni Iversen (leniverse) | 1183 comments For most of the decades I had several options, but apparently I don't have any unread books on my shelves that were written by a woman in the 1930s.


message 3: by Pink (new)

Pink | 6556 comments Good luck with your challenge, I hope you find a 1930s selection that you like the look of!


message 4: by Aubrey (last edited Dec 10, 2018 01:33PM) (new)

Aubrey (korrick) | 2359 comments If you search for 'not so quiet' on this page, you'll hit my row of 1930's books by women, a little more than 30 in total, including ratings and some reviews for the ones I've read. There's an odd children's book here and there, but there's also some absolute favorites of mine: https://www.goodreads.com/review/list...


message 5: by Terris (new)

Terris | 2338 comments Leni, here is a link that Jehona (I think) shared regarding lists of books published in specific years. Hope this helps :)

https://www.ocf.berkeley.edu/~immer/b...


message 6: by Leni (last edited Dec 11, 2018 02:06AM) (new)

Leni Iversen (leniverse) | 1183 comments Thanks, Aubrey and Terris!


message 7: by Kathleen (new)

Kathleen | 3590 comments You deserve a break after reading the entire Old Testament (I am so impressed). I'm really curious about the Herland trilogy.

My challenge this year was the 30's. I'm not going to finish it but I'm reading Dorothy Parker stories right now which are a kick, and I'm also reading The Autobiography of Alice B. Toklas and loving it. But here's what I recommend: Nightwood by Djuna Barnes. It's so crazy!


message 8: by Leni (new)

Leni Iversen (leniverse) | 1183 comments Kathleen wrote: "You deserve a break after reading the entire Old Testament (I am so impressed). I'm really curious about the Herland trilogy.

My challenge this year was the 30's. I'm not going to finish it but I'..."


Haha, thanks. 2018 has been Year of the Chunkster. For 2019 I'm aiming for Year of the Shelf. And maybe not too many door stoppers.

Nightwood looks... interesting. Definitely adding to my TBR. But for the challenge I'll stick to something that I can find at the library. And Nightwood is too weird for my library. lol


message 9: by Leni (new)

Leni Iversen (leniverse) | 1183 comments Aubrey wrote: "If you search for 'not so quiet' on this page, you'll hit my row of 1930's books by women, a little more than 30 in total, including ratings and some reviews for the ones I've read. There's an odd ..."

I must not be doing this right. When I get to the page that has "Not so Quiet", I only find two books from the 30s surrounded by books from every decade. :-/


message 10: by Aubrey (new)

Aubrey (korrick) | 2359 comments Hm. I guess choice of ordering isn't retained in the link. Well, if you don't mind going through the trouble of sorting the list from oldest publication date to youngest, you'll find the 30s books on the second page via the same search method.


message 11: by Leni (new)

Leni Iversen (leniverse) | 1183 comments Aubrey wrote: "Hm. I guess choice of ordering isn't retained in the link. Well, if you don't mind going through the trouble of sorting the list from oldest publication date to youngest, you'll find the 30s books ..."

Oh, sheesh, I just discovered a function I never knew existed! LOL
I've just been using the tabs on the top of the list, and never realised there's more sorting options in a pull down menu at the bottom of the page. Thank you!


message 12: by Aubrey (new)

Aubrey (korrick) | 2359 comments Ha ha, no problem. You can also click on the title of each column right before the first book entry (date pub, rating, title, etc), and it'll also sort by that particular category.


message 13: by Marilyn (new)

Marilyn | 685 comments Great list! I am also reading The Ship of Widows so I will be looking to see what you think of it.


message 14: by Leni (new)

Leni Iversen (leniverse) | 1183 comments Alright... options:

Testament of Youth - available in multiple copies at my local library. I am planning on reading more non-fiction this year, so this is a good option.

Mary Poppins - also available at my local library. A children's classic! Yes, why not. I've never read this. I've heard the author hated the movie, so I'd quite like to see what the book is like. And there's a remake or sequel movie out these days.

The Good Earth - available as an ebook only through my library system. That means reading on the iPad. Not too fond of that. But I feel like Pearl S. Buck is an author I should get acquainted with.

Out of Africa - also available as ebook only. But it's a book that's been on my want-to-read list for some time.


message 15: by Aubrey (new)

Aubrey (korrick) | 2359 comments 'Testament of Youth' is an absolute favorite of mine, so I'd have to vote for that one, lengthy (and depressing) as it is.


message 16: by siriusedward (new)

siriusedward (elenaraphael) | 2011 comments The Good Earth was a very good read.:)


message 17: by Bob, Short Story Classics (new)

Bob | 4781 comments Mod
I've read Mary Poppins and The Good Earth. Poppins is light hearted read, Good Earth isn't. If I had to reread one or the other, a coin toss would be my only way to chose.


message 18: by Leni (new)

Leni Iversen (leniverse) | 1183 comments Finally got started on this challenge.
Anne of Avonlea was great fun. I liked this a lot better than the first book in the series, and I'm tempted to dig in and read the next one.

I always read murder mysteries over Easter (it's a Norwegian thing), and I might make April a crime/murder/thriller themed month. That should cover quite a few books from this challenge. Christie, Sayers, and du Maurier. Maybe Jean Rhys?


message 19: by Leni (new)

Leni Iversen (leniverse) | 1183 comments Wide Sargasso Sea was intriguing, in a psychological horror kind of way. I think it's fortunate that I never liked Mr. Rochester much!

I also sort of read a book for the 80s - Housekeeping
It's not the book I planned on reading, and it didn't come from my bookshelf, so I'm going to be strict with myself and not count it. (Unless we get to December and I still haven't read my 1980s book.)


message 20: by Aubrey (last edited Apr 11, 2019 10:01AM) (new)

Aubrey (korrick) | 2359 comments Leni wrote: "Wide Sargasso Sea was intriguing, in a psychological horror kind of way. I think it's fortunate that I never liked Mr. Rochester much!

I also sort of read a book for the 80s - book:..."


That's fair. Did you like 'Housekeeping'? I thought it was uniquely interesting.


message 21: by Leni (new)

Leni Iversen (leniverse) | 1183 comments Aubrey wrote: "That's fair. Did you like 'Housekeeping'? I thought it was uniquely interesting. "

It was interesting, but I had trouble concentrating on it. I tried to work out as I read what it was that didn't work for me. I enjoy long sentences and unusual descriptions. The characters and the setting and everything, it should have ticked so many boxes with me, but I somehow couldn't connect. Maybe it was the time and place, my current mood. Maybe it was a bit too uniquely interesting.


message 22: by Leni (new)

Leni Iversen (leniverse) | 1183 comments The long Easter break is over, and I have wallowed in murder mysteries. I've read my 1920s book, Clouds of Witness (and another Sayers), and my 1940s book, The Body in the Library, and three other Miss Marple stories (I had an omnibus). I also had a modern cozy-ish mystery, but it fell flat in comparison with the Golden Age champions.

Plans for May: My Cousin Rachel, for sure. I think I'll do Mary Poppins for the 1930s, and read it with Spawn 2. But we have another couple of books to get through first. (We just finished A Wrinkle in Time (which is another book for the 60s), and he's surprisingly keen on the rest of that quintet. I think it might be one of those books that you really should read as a child. But I am of course happy to read on with him! We just need the library to get them in for us.)


message 23: by Leni (new)

Leni Iversen (leniverse) | 1183 comments The Herland Trilogy read. Although it is not strictly speaking a trilogy. "Herland" and "With Her in Ourland" is a duologi. "Moving the Mountain" has nothing to do with the other two except for a similarity in themes. I also think that's the one I preferred, because it deals with a more plausible society. "Herland" is a fun thought experiment, but women suddenly reproducing through parthenogenesis as a sort of miracle with no science behind it is a weak premise. All three books are basically Moore's Utopia but focusing on the importance of women being people, not just females. CPD was well ahead of her times! But also a product of them. I love what she is saying about nature vs nurture when it comes to gender differences, and her positive view of humanity. She'd get along well with the Basic Income movement. But then there's the scary eugenics and the weird notion that sex should only be for making babies.


message 24: by Pink (new)

Pink | 6556 comments I like the Herland story, but not enough to continue with it. I agree she was ahead of the times, whilst still being a product of them. You’ve reminded me that I have her collection of The Yellow Wallpaper and other stories and I’ve only read the title story, so should probably explore the rest.


message 25: by Veronique (new)

Veronique | 890 comments Great titles, Leni! :O)

I just read Herland and liked it a lot, but had the same concerns. Still, for its time, it was thought-provoking. Apart from this novella and the short story The Yellow Paper, I haven’t read anything else, and yes, I really should explore too.

Hope you’re liking My Cousin Rachel :O)


message 26: by Leni (new)

Leni Iversen (leniverse) | 1183 comments I think it might be interesting to CPD's non-fiction, Women and Economics and The Home: Its Work and Influence.

I'm sure I will like My Cousin Rachel when I finally get to it! Time got away from me when I intended to read it. June is sci-fi for me, so Parable of the Sower will be the next book I read from this list. Then I'm planning on Morante's History in July, since Darren will be reading it then. But so far it looks like I'll actually complete this challenge this year. Yay! (Let's... not talk about the Old and New challenge...)


message 27: by Veronique (new)

Veronique | 890 comments Really need to check non-fiction more often.

Nice plan! All for Scifi June :O) I liked Foundation too - I think I finished the second one.
Certainly looks like you will be completing this challenge. Don’t worry about the other two. I haven’t even started mine... I have read, plenty, but I’ve needed a lot of easy reading to deal with RL. I’m still hopeful to get at least one book! LOL


message 28: by Leni (new)

Leni Iversen (leniverse) | 1183 comments Veronique wrote: "Really need to check non-fiction more often.

Nice plan! All for Scifi June :O) I liked Foundation too - I think I finished the second one.
Certainly looks like you will be completing this challen..."


Yeah, I try to keep up with some group reads, and then sometimes I just need some undemanding entertainment. So then my reading challenges suffer. Quite a lot lately actually. Easy escapist read or a video game. Hiding from the current political situation. :-/


message 29: by Leni (new)

Leni Iversen (leniverse) | 1183 comments I have really lost my momentum. Hardly read at all in September, and so far in October I'm just binge reading Urban Fantasy and Paranormal Romances. I have more or less ditched my challenges. But I think I can complete this one. With some changes.

I just finished The Mandarins by Simone de Beauvoir
I think I started it at the end of June. It's no fault of the book that it took me so long though, it's just my current headspace. The Mandarins is excellent. I have struggled with her non-fiction before, but it turns out that her thoughts are gripping when put into a novel of ideas featuring Paris intellectuals struggling to find their way after WW2. 5 stars. And over 750 pages. Since it also came from my bookshelves I am substituting it for my 1950s book. (I might still read My Cousin Rachel this year. I would like to.)

And my 1990s book is substituted with Wise Children by Angela Carter which I read back in May. That was great fun. I love Angela Carter. That means no Parable of the Sower, but I did read another Octavia Butler book, also back in May, I think. Kindred by Octavia E. Butler . That could go into the 1970s slot, but I did start Morante's History this summer and I'd like to finish it. I loved the beginning, but then it sort of went nowhere - in great detail. I put it down for a while.


message 30: by Kathleen (new)

Kathleen | 3590 comments Interesting about The Mandarins. I have her non-fiction coming up, and will have to see how I do with it.

Sorry to hear you're in a bit of a reading slump. Sometimes we have to roll with life and see where it dumps us off. Maybe getting rid of the challenge books and starting fresh with whatever you feel like will help!


message 31: by Veronique (last edited Oct 15, 2019 06:52AM) (new)

Veronique | 890 comments Leni wrote: "I have really lost my momentum. Hardly read at all in September, and so far in October I'm just binge reading Urban Fantasy and Paranormal Romances. I have more or less ditched my challenges. But I..."

Totally understandable! I seem to take refuge in speculative/romantic fiction too, even though I do seriously want to get to all my other genres... Rather frustrating. As for challenges, don’t worry about it.

The Mandarins sound really good! Adding to my never-ending list. My Cousin Rachel is a quick read, by the way. In case it helps :O)


message 32: by Sue (new)

Sue K H (sky_bluez) | 3052 comments You're doing great for being in a reading slump Leni. I'm in a mini one now and hope to break out of it soon.

It's great that you were able to get three more off the list,


message 33: by Pink (new)

Pink | 6556 comments Leni wrote: "I have really lost my momentum. Hardly read at all in September, and so far in October I'm just binge reading Urban Fantasy and Paranormal Romances. I have more or less ditched my challenges. But I..."

Same here! I’ve hardly read at all over the past couple of months. A bit of rejigging looks like it will help you out. Good luck with whatever you read for the rest of the year :)


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