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General > What NYRB Classic are you reading now?

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message 1: by Louise (new)

Louise | 491 comments Mod
While we wait for our book club discussion to start in January, tell us what NYRB Classic you are reading now.

I'm reading Compulsory Games. Some stories are wowing me, and others just leave me confused. I also find it difficult to read any particular story in bits. Each story is better read if I can do it in one sitting. I suppose that is true of most short story collections but even moreso with Robert Aickman's. He demands your full attention.

What are you reading?


message 2: by Mirko (new)

Mirko | 77 comments At the moment I'm not reading a NYRB. The last one I read was a couple of weeks ago, Agostino by Alberto Moravia. I like to switch things up a bit in between. The next NYRB is going to be likely one that hasn't been chosen for the January read, but is on my list. :)


message 3: by Randolph (new)

Randolph (us227381) Inverted World by Christopher Priest.


message 4: by Louise (new)

Louise | 491 comments Mod
I will most likely finish Compulsory Games tonight so I'm looking for a short read to squeeze in before our January pick. Looking at my shelves, shorter novels that I have include No Tomorrow, Late Fame and Niki: The Story of a Dog. Which to choose, that is the question.


message 5: by Mirko (new)

Mirko | 77 comments Louise wrote: "....I'm looking for a short read to squeeze in before our January pick. Looking at my shelves, shorter novels that I have include No Tomorrow, Late Fame and Niki: The Story of a Dog. Which to choose, that is the question"

Late Fame by Arthur Schnitzler

.... was a great read. Would definitely recommend it. :)


message 6: by WndyJW (new)

WndyJW | 288 comments My most recent was the outstanding The Lonely Passion of Judith Hearne.


message 7: by Jason (last edited Dec 09, 2018 12:44PM) (new)

Jason (uberzensch) | 83 comments I'm currently reading The World as I Found It, by Bruce Duffy. I believe he categorizes the novel as "non-fiction fiction". It follows the life of philosopher Ludwig Wittgenstein, along with Bertrand Russell and G.E. Moore. It's very well done, but I wonder if someone without a background in philosophy would get as much enjoyment out of it.

Edit to add that the novel is not overly focused on the philosophy of these gentlemen (in fact, the philosophy is somewhat in the background).


message 8: by Janet (last edited Dec 10, 2018 02:21PM) (new)

Janet (janetevans) | 63 comments In November, my book group read Barbara Comyns The Juniper Tree This novel was a retelling of one of the darkest of Grimms fairy tales. Highly discussable, and Comyns is such an original, quirky writer. I have her The Vet's Daughter and Our Spoons Came from Woolworths on my TBR pile


message 9: by WndyJW (last edited Dec 10, 2018 05:10PM) (new)

WndyJW | 288 comments I have wanted Our Spoons Came from Woolworths for awhile. I liked The Vet's Daughter a lot!


message 10: by Antonomasia (new)

Antonomasia | 44 comments WndyJW wrote: "I have wanted Our Spoons Came from Woolworths for awhile!"

I'd also really like to read this (had it shelved on GR for over 5 years). Comyns' other books don't appeal to me so much but this sort of kitchen-sink realism from that era does.


message 11: by Toni (new)

Toni | 1 comments WndyJW wrote: "My most recent was the outstanding The Lonely Passion of Judith Hearne."

Exceptional book!


message 12: by WndyJW (new)

WndyJW | 288 comments Wasn’t it, Toni? I loved it, my mother, who being born in 1938 still felt the influence of her Victorian era grandmother in the expectations for women of the middle, merchants class really loved it.

I like those sort of book as well, Anto.


message 13: by sisilia (new)

sisilia (sisilia9) | 53 comments I recently read My Dog Tulip for IRL bookclub's meeting a week ago, and am getting ready to start The Kremlin Ball.


message 14: by Teresa (new)

Teresa (teresaaustin) | 3 comments I’m reading Family Lexicon by Natalia Ginzburg.


message 15: by Louise (new)

Louise | 491 comments Mod
sisilia wrote: "I recently read My Dog Tulip for IRL bookclub's meeting a week ago, and am getting ready to start The Kremlin Ball."

I just read this. What did you book club think of it?


message 16: by sisilia (new)

sisilia (sisilia9) | 53 comments Louise wrote: "sisilia wrote: "I recently read My Dog Tulip for IRL bookclub's meeting a week ago, and am getting ready to start The Kremlin Ball."

I just read this. What did you book club think of it?"


We love JR. Ackerley and plan to read his memoir My Father and Myself some time this year. My Dog Tulip is a must-read for dog lovers, and we all agreed that this book makes an excellent Christmas present.


message 17: by Pillsonista (last edited Dec 19, 2018 05:35PM) (new)

Pillsonista | 17 comments Inhuman Land by Józef Czapski Corrigan by Caroline Blackwood

Currently taking a break from Inhuman Land with Caroline Blackwood's Corrigan, which has been terrific so far.


message 18: by Bryan--The Bee’s Knees (last edited Feb 27, 2019 09:18PM) (new)

Bryan--The Bee’s Knees (theindefatigablebertmcguinn) | 52 comments Just finished J. L. Carr's A Month in the Country. What an excellent short novel. Very reflective and bittersweet, but not in a cloying, obvious way. This may actually be my favorite book of the year so far.


message 19: by Hugh (new)

Hugh (bodachliath) | 24 comments Bryan wrote: "Just finished J. L. Carr's A Month in the Country. What an excellent short novel. Very reflective and bittersweet, but not in a cloying, obvious way. This may actually be my favorite b..."
I loved that one. Also read The Battle Of Pollocks Crossing which was very interesting and often funny (it is set in rural South Dakota, and it caricatures Carr's own experiences teaching there for a year in the late 30s), if not quite as good as A Month in the Country.


Bryan--The Bee’s Knees (theindefatigablebertmcguinn) | 52 comments Hugh wrote: "I loved that one. Also read The Battle Of Pollocks Crossing which was very interesting and often funny (it is set in rural South Dakota, and it caricatures Carr's own experiences teaching there for a year in the late 30s), if not quite as good as A Month in the Country. ..."

I'll be looking for all of Carr's work from now on. Good to hear that he had other successes too.


message 21: by Louise (new)

Louise | 491 comments Mod
I would love to read A Month in the Country as a group read here. It will be one of my nominations for our May book (nominations start tomorrow!)


Bryan--The Bee’s Knees (theindefatigablebertmcguinn) | 52 comments I think it would be a great choice.


message 23: by Janet (new)

Janet (janetevans) | 63 comments Agree. My IRL book group read it years ago and we had a terrific discussion.


message 24: by Mirko (last edited Mar 02, 2019 03:39PM) (new)

Mirko | 77 comments I am about to start reading My Father and Myself
My Father and Myself by J.R. Ackerley

It will be the first book I am reading by J. R. Ackerley.


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