Catching up on Classics (and lots more!) discussion

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2019 Old & New Classic Challenge > MK's 2019 Classics New & Old, & TBRs for pleasure :)

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message 1: by MK (last edited Apr 16, 2019 12:31AM) (new)

MK (wisny) | 2993 comments .
POST #1 - MK's Official Rules Challenge!
Need 12 out of 14 to succeed!!

"Official Rules, Read 12 out of 14 Pre-chosen, No Take-backsies, Three plus Three plus Six plus Only Two Wild Cards Total!, Success with 86% Read-rate!, Books!"
For Tracking Progress ... "Official-Rules Challenge!"
(see post #3 for list of challenge books)


=============================================

MK's 2019 Classics New & Old, & TBRs for pleasure :)
"Official-Rules" Challenge!


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Old School 1899 or earlier
1. (The Odyssey, by Homer)

2. (Utopia, by Thomas More)

3. (The Faerie Queene, by Edmund Spenser)


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New School 1900-1999
1. (Dubliners, by James Joyce)

2. (Ulysses, by James Joyce)

3. (The Hours, by Michael Cunningham)


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Intellect Neutral Brain Candy
Want a be Literature - Guaranteed to not make you smarter, but shouldn't cost any existing brain cells
1. The Martian - Robinson Crusoe in space!
The Martian by Andy Weir by Andy Weir
The Martian by Andy Weir *
4.40 avg rating — 658,750 ratings — published 2012
MK's rating: it was amazing * * * * *
Six days ago, astronaut Mark Watney became one of the first people to walk on Mars.
Now, he's sure he'll be the first person to die there.
After a dust storm nearly kills him and forces his crew to evacuate while thinking him dead, Mark finds himself stranded and completely alone with no way to even signal Earth t ...more

2. (Peter Pan related book (retelling? can't remember the name just now))

3. (Books 2 & 3 of the Treasure Island Prequel series!)

4. (Books 1 & 2 of the Treasure Island Sequel series!)

5. (Father Brown mystery #1)

6. (Lois Lowry's The Giver)
The Giver (The Giver, #1) by Lois Lowry by Lois Lowry
The Giver (The Giver, #1), by Lois Lowry *
4.12 avg rating — 1,515,004 ratings — published 1993
MK's rating: really liked it * * * *
The Giver, the 1994 Newbery Medal winner, has become one of the most influential novels of our time. The haunting story centers on twelve-year-old Jonas, who lives in a seemingly ideal, if colorless, ...more

I read the whole quartet, instead of just The Giver. They each focus on different, wholly separate communities, within the same world. All are eventually linked up together by the end of the storyarc. The stories are linked up, I mean, not the communities within the world. The other three:
Gathering Blue (The Giver, #2) by Lois Lowry Messenger (The Giver, #3) by Lois Lowry Son (The Giver, #4) by Lois Lowry


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Alternates
1a. Beowulf -
(for kids, 1999 - by Kevin Crossley-Holland, Charles Keeping (Illustrator))
Beowulf by Kevin Crossley-Holland by Kevin Crossley-Holland illustrated by Charles Keeping
Beowulf by Kevin Crossley-Holland, Charles Keeping (Illustrator)
3.50 avg rating — 179 ratings — published 1999
MK's rating: not rated
This is the story of a young man who travelled far across the sea to fight two terrifying monsters-one who could rip a man apart and drink his blood, the other who lived like a sea-wolf at the bottom ...more

1b. Beowulf -
(for kids - by Rosemary Sutcliff, Charles Keeping (Illustrator))
Beowulf by Rosemary Sutcliff by Rosemary Sutcliff illustrated by Charles Keeping
Beowulf by Rosemary Sutcliff
3.58 avg rating — 383 ratings — published 1956
MK's rating: not rated
A vivid re-telling of the classic tale of high adventure, desperate enterprises and bloody encounters.This thrilling re-telling of the Anglo-Saxon legend recounts Beowulf’s most terrifying quests: aga ...more

1c. Beowulf -
(graphic novel - by Gareth Hinds (Goodreads Author) (Adapted by)
Beowulf by Gareth Hinds by Gareth Hinds
Beowulf by Gareth Hinds *
3.36 avg rating — 6,412 ratings — published 2007
MK's rating: not rated
This exhilarating graphic novel edition of an ancient classic honors the spirit of the original as it attracts modern readers. The epic tale of the great warrior Beowulf has thrilled readers through t ...more

1d. Beowulf: An Updated Verse Translation, -
(Rebsamen translation)
Beowulf An Updated Verse Translation by Unknown, translated by Frederick Rebsamen
Beowulf: An Updated Verse Translation, by Unknown, Frederick Rebsamen
3.43 avg rating — 203,909 ratings — published 975
MK's rating: not rated
A verse translation of the first great narrative poem in the English language that captures the feeling and tone of the original.

1e. Beowulf - (Crossley-Holland translation, 1968)
Beowulf by Unknown, translated by Kevin Crossley-Holland, introduced by Bruce Mitchell
Beowulf, by Unknown, Kevin Crossley-Holland, Bruce Mitchell
4.67 avg rating — 3 ratings — published
MK's rating: not rated
This edition was published in 1968, see the bottom for a new edition with a different contributor, published in 2008, as well as an illustrated rhythmical prose edition for children published in 1999. ...more

1f. Beowulf the Warrior -
(for kids - by Ian Serraillier, Severin (Illustrator))
Beowulf the Warrior by Ian Serraillier, translated by Ian Serraillier, illustrated by Severin
Beowulf the Warrior, by Ian Serraillier, Severin (Illustrator)
3.73 avg rating — 191 ratings — published
MK's rating: not rated
From the back flap: BEOWULF The Warrior retold by Ian Serraillier illustrated by Severin Here is a spirited version of the oldest English verse epic. With tremendous power and memorable simplicity, Ia ...more

1g. Beowulf: A Translation and Commentary (Tolkien translation)
Beowulf A Translation and Commentary by Unknown, translated by J.R.R. Tolkien, edited by Christopher Tolkien
Beowulf: A Translation and Commentary, by Unknown, translated by J.R.R. Tolkien, edited by Christopher Tolkien
3.74 avg rating — 5,811 ratings — published 2014
MK's rating: not rated
The translation of Beowulf by J.R.R. Tolkien was an early work, very distinctive in its mode, completed in 1926: he returned to it later to make hasty corrections, but seems never to have considered i ...more

1h. Kid Beowulf: The Blood-Bound Oath (graphic novel, 1st of a trilogy)
Kid Beowulf and the Blood-Bound Oath by Alexis E. Fajardo, by Alexis E. Fajardo
Kid Beowulf: The Blood-Bound Oath, by Alexis E. Fajardo *
3.76 avg rating — 104 ratings — published 2008
MK's rating: not rated
If you liked Percy Jackson, you'll love Kid Beowulf! Inspired by the epic poem "Beowulf," this fun new series follows the adventures of 12-year-old twin brothers Beowulf and Grendel as they travel to ...more

1i. Beowulf -
(for kids - by Michael Morpurgo (Adaptor), Michael Foreman (Illustrator)
Beowulf by Michael Morpurgo, adapted by Michael Morpurgo, illustrated by Michael Foreman
Beowulf, by Michael Morpurgo
3.85 avg rating — 510 ratings — published 2006
MK's rating: not rated
The acclaimed author and illustrator of SIR GAWAIN AND THE GREEN KNIGHT return with an exhilarating edition of Britain's oldest epic.Long ago there was a Scandinavian warrior who fought three evils so ...more


2. (Mrs. Dalloway, by Virginia Woolf)

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message 2: by MK (last edited Apr 16, 2019 12:33AM) (new)

MK (wisny) | 2993 comments .
POST #2 - MK's Duffer-Level Challenge!
Only need 66% success rate (12 out of 18) to succeed!! *grin*

"Duffer-Level, Read 12 out of 18 Pre-chosen, No Take-backsies, Two Wild Cards in Each Section, Success with 66% Read-rate!, Books!"

For Tracking Progress ... "Duffer-Level Challenge!"
(see post #4 for list of challenge books)


=============================================

MK's 2019 Classics New & Old, & TBRs for pleasure :)
"Duffer-Level" Challenge!


-------------------------------------------------------------------

Old School 1899 or earlier
1. (The Odyssey, by Homer)

2. (Utopia, by Thomas More)

3. (The Faerie Queene, by Edmund Spenser)

Two Old-School Alternates
1a. Beowulf -
(for kids, 1999 - by Kevin Crossley-Holland, Charles Keeping (Illustrator))
Beowulf by Kevin Crossley-Holland by Kevin Crossley-Holland illustrated by Charles Keeping
Beowulf by Kevin Crossley-Holland, Charles Keeping (Illustrator)
3.50 avg rating — 179 ratings — published 1999
MK's rating: not rated
This is the story of a young man who travelled far across the sea to fight two terrifying monsters-one who could rip a man apart and drink his blood, the other who lived like a sea-wolf at the bottom ...more

1b. Beowulf -
(for kids - by Rosemary Sutcliff, Charles Keeping (Illustrator))
Beowulf by Rosemary Sutcliff by Rosemary Sutcliff illustrated by Charles Keeping
Beowulf by Rosemary Sutcliff, Charles Keeping (Illustrator)
3.58 avg rating — 383 ratings — published 1956
MK's rating: not rated
A vivid re-telling of the classic tale of high adventure, desperate enterprises and bloody encounters.This thrilling re-telling of the Anglo-Saxon legend recounts Beowulf’s most terrifying quests: aga ...more

1c. Beowulf -
(graphic novel - by Gareth Hinds (Goodreads Author) (Adapted by)
Beowulf by Gareth Hinds by Gareth Hinds
Beowulf by Gareth Hinds *
3.36 avg rating — 6,412 ratings — published 2007
MK's rating: not rated
This exhilarating graphic novel edition of an ancient classic honors the spirit of the original as it attracts modern readers. The epic tale of the great warrior Beowulf has thrilled readers through t ...more

1d. Beowulf: An Updated Verse Translation, -
(Rebsamen translation)
Beowulf An Updated Verse Translation by Unknown, translated by Frederick Rebsamen
Beowulf: An Updated Verse Translation, by Unknown, Frederick Rebsamen
3.43 avg rating — 203,909 ratings — published 975
MK's rating: not rated
A verse translation of the first great narrative poem in the English language that captures the feeling and tone of the original.

1e. Beowulf - (Crossley-Holland translation, 1968)
Beowulf by Unknown, translated by Kevin Crossley-Holland, introduced by Bruce Mitchell
Beowulf, by Unknown, Kevin Crossley-Holland, Bruce Mitchell
4.67 avg rating — 3 ratings — published
MK's rating: not rated
This edition was published in 1968, see the bottom for a new edition with a different contributor, published in 2008, as well as an illustrated rhythmical prose edition for children published in 1999. ...more

1f. Beowulf the Warrior -
(for kids - by Ian Serraillier, Severin (Illustrator))
Beowulf the Warrior by Ian Serraillier, translated by Ian Serraillier, illustrated by Severin
Beowulf the Warrior, by Ian Serraillier, Severin (Illustrator)
3.73 avg rating — 191 ratings — published
MK's rating: not rated
From the back flap: BEOWULF The Warrior retold by Ian Serraillier illustrated by Severin Here is a spirited version of the oldest English verse epic. With tremendous power and memorable simplicity, Ia ...more

1g. Beowulf: A Translation and Commentary (Tolkien translation)
Beowulf A Translation and Commentary by Unknown, translated by J.R.R. Tolkien, edited by Christopher Tolkien
Beowulf: A Translation and Commentary, by Unknown, translated by J.R.R. Tolkien, edited by Christopher Tolkien
3.74 avg rating — 5,811 ratings — published 2014
MK's rating: not rated
The translation of Beowulf by J.R.R. Tolkien was an early work, very distinctive in its mode, completed in 1926: he returned to it later to make hasty corrections, but seems never to have considered i ...more

1h. Kid Beowulf: The Blood-Bound Oath (graphic novel, 1st of a trilogy)
Kid Beowulf and the Blood-Bound Oath by Alexis E. Fajardo, by Alexis E. Fajardo
Kid Beowulf: The Blood-Bound Oath, by Alexis E. Fajardo *
3.76 avg rating — 104 ratings — published 2008
MK's rating: not rated
If you liked Percy Jackson, you'll love Kid Beowulf! Inspired by the epic poem "Beowulf," this fun new series follows the adventures of 12-year-old twin brothers Beowulf and Grendel as they travel to ...more

1i. Beowulf -
(for kids - by Michael Morpurgo (Adaptor), Michael Foreman (Illustrator)
Beowulf by Michael Morpurgo, adapted by Michael Morpurgo, illustrated by Michael Foreman
Beowulf, by Michael Morpurgo
3.85 avg rating — 510 ratings — published 2006
MK's rating: not rated
The acclaimed author and illustrator of SIR GAWAIN AND THE GREEN KNIGHT return with an exhilarating edition of Britain's oldest epic.Long ago there was a Scandinavian warrior who fought three evils so ...more

2. (The Iliad, by Homer)


--------------------------------------------------

New School 1900-1999
1. (Dubliners, by James Joyce)

2. (Ulysses, by James Joyce)

3. (The Hours, by Michael Cunningham)

Two New-School Alternates
1. (Mrs. Dalloway, by Virginia Woolf)

2. (Lord of the Flies, by William Golding)


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Intellect Neutral Brain Candy
Want a be Literature - Guaranteed to not make you smarter, but shouldn't cost any existing brain cells
1. The Martian - Robinson Crusoe in space!
The Martian by Andy Weir by Andy Weir
The Martian by Andy Weir *
4.40 avg rating — 658,750 ratings — published 2012
MK's rating: it was amazing * * * * *
Six days ago, astronaut Mark Watney became one of the first people to walk on Mars.
Now, he's sure he'll be the first person to die there.
After a dust storm nearly kills him and forces his crew to evacuate while thinking him dead, Mark finds himself stranded and completely alone with no way to even signal Earth t ...more

2. (Peter Pan related book (retelling? can't remember the name just now))

3. (Books 2 (& 3?) of Drake's Treasure Island Prequel series!)

4. (Books 1 (& 2?) of Motion's Treasure Island Sequel series!)

5. (Sabatini's Captain Blood (or the whole trilogy?))

6. (Swift's Gulliver's Travels)

Two Wild-Card Alternates
1. (Ransome's Swallows & Amazons #2 (or the whole rest of the series!?))

2. (Lois Lowry's The Giver)
The Giver (The Giver, #1) by Lois Lowry by Lois Lowry
The Giver (The Giver, #1), by Lois Lowry *
4.12 avg rating — 1,515,004 ratings — published 1993
MK's rating: really liked it * * * *
The Giver, the 1994 Newbery Medal winner, has become one of the most influential novels of our time. The haunting story centers on twelve-year-old Jonas, who lives in a seemingly ideal, if colorless, ...more

I read the whole quartet, instead of just The Giver. They each focus on different, wholly separate communities, within the same world. All are eventually linked up together by the end of the storyarc. The stories are linked up, I mean, not the communities within the world. The other three:
Gathering Blue (The Giver, #2) by Lois Lowry Messenger (The Giver, #3) by Lois Lowry Son (The Giver, #4) by Lois Lowry


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message 3: by MK (last edited Feb 10, 2019 05:53AM) (new)

MK (wisny) | 2993 comments . ===================================================================

For Planning/Setting the "Official Rules Challenge" Books ...NO editing after 12/31/18
(ok, I edited - but just to put in spoiler tags & clean up my thread - I swear! *smile*)

(view spoiler)
.


message 4: by MK (last edited Feb 10, 2019 05:55AM) (new)

MK (wisny) | 2993 comments .
===================================================================

For Planning/Setting the "Duffer Level Challenge" Books ...NO editing after 12/31/18
(ok, I edited - but just to put in spoiler tags & clean up my thread - I swear! *smile*)

(view spoiler)
.


message 5: by MK (last edited Apr 02, 2019 05:39PM) (new)

MK (wisny) | 2993 comments .

The Rules ...

(view spoiler)
,

MK's 2019 Reading Challenge

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MK's 2019 Challenge Threads (or Posts) ...

A-Z Author Challenge
A-Z Title Challenge
Classic Bingo Challenge
Old & New Classic Challenge
Reading George Eliot 2019 Challenge
Quest for Women Authors Challenge


MK's Other Challenge Threads (or Posts) ...

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message 6: by MK (last edited Apr 03, 2019 01:04PM) (new)

MK (wisny) | 2993 comments ,

MK's 2019 Reading Challenge

YOUR 2019 BOOKS - updated Apr 03, 2019

(view spoiler)
.


message 7: by MK (last edited Apr 02, 2019 05:40PM) (new)

MK (wisny) | 2993 comments ,

MK's 2019 Reading Challenge

YOUR 2019 BOOKS - updated Mar 18, 2019

(view spoiler)
.


message 8: by MK (last edited Apr 03, 2019 01:04PM) (new)

MK (wisny) | 2993 comments .
MKs 2019 Books, Reverse Chronological Order - updated Apr 03, 2019
(view spoiler)


message 9: by MK (last edited Apr 03, 2019 01:03PM) (new)

MK (wisny) | 2993 comments .
MKs 2019 Authors Read, reverse chronological order - updated Apr 03, 2019
(view spoiler)


message 10: by Katy, New School Classics (new)

Katy (kathy_h) | 9328 comments Mod
Just in case ...
LOL


message 11: by MK (new)

MK (wisny) | 2993 comments yep ;-)


message 12: by MK (new)

MK (wisny) | 2993 comments I *think* I have my classics picks filled in.
I think!

I kinda want to continue the adventure stories I'm reading now, but I suspect I'll be ready for something else in a few months.

If I don't change my mind on the classics part, I only have the fun TBRs that I've been meaning to get to, to fill in :D


message 13: by Christopher (new)

Christopher (Donut) | 179 comments MK- good luck on the Faerie Queen- it is enormous.


message 14: by Katy, New School Classics (new)

Katy (kathy_h) | 9328 comments Mod
I've written off James Joyce, so good luck with those.


message 15: by MK (new)

MK (wisny) | 2993 comments Christopher wrote: "MK- good luck on the Faerie Queen- it is enormous."

I knowwwwwww

Pretty sure I'm getting the audible. I've eyeballed it a few times over the last year...


message 16: by MK (new)

MK (wisny) | 2993 comments Katy wrote: "I've written off James Joyce, so good luck with those."

LOL !

shhhh don't scare me


message 17: by Erin (new)

Erin (erinm31) | 609 comments MK wrote: "Katy wrote: "I've written off James Joyce, so good luck with those."

LOL !

shhhh don't scare me"


I started Ulysses last year and hope to start it again and maybe finish next year... or maybe just Dubliners next year and I’ll save Ulysses for 2020... I think I’ve read that Dubliners is easier to read and so might be a good introduction to his style and comes in short-story chunks! 😂

Good luck with your challenge! 😁


message 18: by Bob, Short Story Classics (new)

Bob | 4850 comments Mod
Ulysses, scares me to death, maybe someday I'll try, but I doubt it. Let me know if you like it.


message 19: by MJ (new)

MJ | 180 comments I'm avoiding Ulysses. I should pick it up again! I started it this year and then life got busy, and my brain just hasn't been up for the focus and/or challenge! good luck with your list!


message 20: by MK (new)

MK (wisny) | 2993 comments Bob wrote: "Ulysses, scares me to death, maybe someday I'll try, but I doubt it. Let me know if you like it."

MJ wrote: "I'm avoiding Ulysses. I should pick it up again! I started it this year and then life got busy, and my brain just hasn't been up for the focus and/or challenge! good luck with your list!"

Ulysses was the birth of 'stream of consciousness', which I hate (Faulkner!), so it kinda scares me, too. But, I don't know. I've read so many articles on it over the last two years, I think it's conquerable :D.

Many of my choices are linked, they're all sort of related. The Hours is Mrs. Dalloway retold? or in response?; Mrs. Dalloway and Ulysses are the Oddysey retold, and Dubliners is Ulysses retold!

I originally had The Iliad instead of Utopia, with the Oddysey, but it seemed like perhaps over-reaching for a year (especially since I've wanted to read The Faerie Queene for awhile. The Faerie Queene is a monster, tho, as Christopher pointed out (*grin*), so .... I put in Beowolf as an escape route, just in case ;-).

And I originally had Mrs. Dalloway instead of The Hours, but same thing. Perhaps overreaching ;-).


My six TBRs are going to be easy peasy ... haven't figured them out yet, but they're going to be treats for me that I've had for a bit, but haven't gotten to. Maybe Ellis Peters, I've collected her Brother Cadfael and The Felse Investigations series(es?) over the last year, but haven't started. Maybe Lois Lowry's Giver series. Maybe the rest of Madeleine L'Engle's Wrinkle series. Maybe some additional Robinson Crusoe or Peter Pan retellings. Or maybe something else entirely, we'll see.


message 21: by MK (last edited Dec 04, 2018 03:38PM) (new)

MK (wisny) | 2993 comments Here's some bits about Ulysses that I pulled up with a quick google:

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Bloomsday
An unforgettable odyssey
Is the fuss over James Joyce's Ulysses greater than the book?
Jun 10th 2004

THE date is as well known to students of English literature as the beginning of the first world war is to military historians: June 16th 1904 is “Bloomsday”, the 24 hours into which James Joyce compressed the wanderings of a Jewish Dubliner—a decent, lustful, advertising salesman named Leopold Bloom. He is the principal figure in “Ulysses”, a sprawling, difficult novel that marked the start of the modern movement in English literature. Its adoption of an original style known as “stream of consciousness” made it one of the seminal works of the 20th century.

Bloomsday has been celebrated by devoted readers of Joyce all over the world for 50 years or so. In Dublin in particular it is regarded as a splendid excuse for a party, beginning at breakfast and often ending in drunken gloom and rancour, just like the book. The breakfast is significant: Bloom's first scene starts with the purchase from a butcher (and the subsequent cooking and consumption) of a pork kidney, a “moist, tender gland”, price threepence.

To celebrate the centenary of Bloomsday, 10,000 tourists and local people—everyone is welcome—will breakfast on Dublin's O'Connell Street in three sittings.

(snip ... )

A large majority of the breakfast celebrants will not have read the book, and a free breakfast might not be enough to get them started. Plenty of readers are familiar with the first line (“Stately, plump Buck Mulligan came from the stairhead, bearing a bowl of lather...”), but few get past the first 50 pages. Roddy Doyle, a popular Irish writer, created a small furore earlier this year when he denounced Ulysses as over-rated and over-long. “It could have done with a good editor,” he boldly declared.

Other Dublin writers sympathise. John Banville, a distinguished Irish novelist, thinks that Mr Doyle expressed a more general exasperation with the Joyce myth. Joyce is a peculiar sort of icon. He was an exile who was born in Dublin but left for the continent, never to return, after the page proofs of his first book, “Dubliners”, were deliberately destroyed by a printer in 1912. “Ulysses” was written mostly in Trieste and Zurich. As Mr Banville says, Joyce's Dublin, drawn from his own unhappy memories, is grim, grey and paralysed. Joyce would probably have had a good laugh at his Irish apotheosis.

Is “Ulysses” as great as its reputation suggests? Some of its 18 episodes are so bizarre that they might have been written in a secret code, but the narrative becomes compelling; the language is sharp and brilliantly coloured. Reading it is hard work, but the book is not inaccessible. It helps, though, to have a good guide.

Some think the best way to approach it is back to front, starting with the silent monologue of Molly Bloom, Leopold's wife, and then turning back to Bloom's catechism in the penultimate episode.

(snip ... )

The very end of the book is almost as well-known as the beginning: “I put my arms around him yes and drew him down to me so he could feel my breasts all perfume yes and his heart was going like mad and yes I said yes I will Yes.” A great book? Yes it is Yes.

link - https://www.economist.com/books-and-a...

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On Ulysses:
Lawrence, Karen / The odyssey of style in Ulysses
(1981)

The narrative norm, pp. 38-54
II 38

The Narrative Norm
The first three chapters of Ulysses pay homage to both the personal tradition
Joyce had created in his previous works of fiction and to the traditional
novel. In its dominant narrative voice and interest in the character of the
artist, the "Telemachiad" resembles A Portrait in particular, and even the
reader of Ulysses who fails to recognize this continuity will experience
a sense of security from the presence of this narrative voice. The staples
of the novel—third-person narration, dialogue, and dramatization of
a scene—also promise narrative security to the reader who begins Ulysses:
they act as signposts promising him familiar terrain on the subsequent pages.
No matter what we may know about the structural apparatus and levels of allegory
in the work after reading Joyce's notesheets, letters, and tips to Stuart
Gilbert, what we experience when beginning Ulysses is a novel that promises
a stony, a narrator, and a plot. "Stately, plump Buck Mulligan came from
the stainhead" (pp. 2-3) is a plausible beginning for any novel. Ulysses
begins like a narrative with confidence in the adequacy of the novel form.
It is important to underscore the initial narrative promises to the reader
made in the novel not only because they will be broken later on but also
because they provide an interesting contrast to the change in Joyce's basic
conceptions of plot and significance in fiction, a change that must have
antedated, at least in part, the beginning of the novel. Ulysses offers,
in a sense, a "rewriting" of Dubliners: it presents another portrait of Dublin
designed to reveal the soul of the city and its citizens. But in arriving
at the basic conception ...

link - http://digicoll.library.wisc.edu/cgi-...

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And, on Dubliners>:
Lawrence, Karen / The odyssey of style in Ulysses
(1981)

Dublin voices, pp. 16-37
I i6

Dublin Voices
Of his purpose in writing Dubliners, Joyce told his publisher Grant Richards
in 1906:
My intention was to write a chapter of the moral history of my country and
I chose Dublin for the scene because that city seemed to me the centre of
paralysis. . . . I have written it for the most part in a style of scrupulous
meanness and with the conviction that he is a very bold man who dares to
alter in the presentment, still more to deform, whatever he has seen and
heard.'
The letter, written in response to Richards' desire for Joyce to alter certain
"troublesome" words in his stories, suggests that he saw his artistic choices
as both aesthetic and moral. In the phrase "scrupulous meanness," Joyce implies
both an aesthetic and moral meticulousness. He defends his diction on the
grounds that it is already as pared and carefully chosen as possible (so
that no word is arbitrary on dispensable) and that it records the "truth"
about Dublin. In the last line of the quotation, Joyce directly links the
style of his stories with his moral duty to represent his subject faithfully.
In this description of his technique in Dubliners, Joyce articulates what
is apparent from reading the stories: that "truth" depends not on the mediation
of the storyteller but on the precision of the prose. The style of scrupulous
mean1 5 May 1906. In Selected Letters of James Joyce, ed. Richard Ellmann
(New
York: The Viking Press, 1975, p. 83. Henceforth the Selected Letters will
be abbreviated as SL.

link - http://digicoll.library.wisc.edu/cgi-...



message 22: by Katy, New School Classics (new)

Katy (kathy_h) | 9328 comments Mod
We had a good group read of Ulysses this past year. When you get to reading, check it out. Several members conquered it and quite a few loved it.


message 23: by MK (new)

MK (wisny) | 2993 comments Katy wrote: "We had a good group read of Ulysses this past year. When you get to reading, check it out. Several members conquered it and quite a few loved it."

Thanks, Katy! I will :)


message 24: by MK (new)

MK (wisny) | 2993 comments MJ wrote: "I'm avoiding Ulysses. I should pick it up again! I started it this year and then life got busy, and my brain just hasn't been up for the focus and/or challenge! good luck with your list!"

Thanks, MJ! Sorry, I missed your post there, it got caught when I was making the Ulysses google posts, I think.

I think you're right, it's a book you have to be in the right mood to read. Hopefully, that'll happen to me this coming year :)


message 25: by MK (new)

MK (wisny) | 2993 comments On Ulysses, this super interesting review just showed up in my feed:

If you're into stuff like this, lyou can read the full review.

Coloured Unicorns: "Allusions in Ulysses: An Annotated List" by Weldon Thornton

(Original Review, 1991-03-18)

I had the good fortune to read “Ulysses” in my late teens without knowing much of its reputation other than that Anthony Burgess, an author whose novels I was enjoying at the time, recommended it highly. I read it as basically a comic novel, sometimes drunk with its author’s learning, sometimes just drunk. Our local library had a book, “Allusions in Ulysses” which ran to several hundred pages, explicating literary, historical, and cultural references in the book – I used it to translate the foreign phrases scattered through the book, but otherwise did not worry about catching the many other references....


A further excerpt from his linked review:
It wasn’t until after my first reading that I even became aware of the references to the Odyssey in the book (though obviously the title alluded to them) and that scholars had assigned each of its chapters a Homeric title.

Do you laugh at Ulysses? I can’t imagine someone reading the book and sticking with it without regularly cracking a smile or even, as I did, LOL’ing every now and then. From “The Ballad of the Joking Jesus” in the first chapter on through the circumlocutions of the catechism in the penultimate chapter, there’s plenty of humor in there, and even when not explicitly funny, as I don’t recall the closing chapter monologue to be, it is warm and human, with lots of brain, but also an abundance of heart and other organs, at least once Leopold Bloom enters in the fourth chapter.

Perhaps the problem is that I knew the books reputation before I started it. I see Joyce as a steamroller crushing my lesser little mind beneath his. There are places where the richness of the imagery captures the absolute essence of something, though, and that's what keeps me staggering back for more.


But, then down the bottom, he writes this:

[2018 EDIT: Some years later, I read Ulysses properly ...]

Here's an excerpt from his 'proper reading' review:
- To me "Ulysses" is still the #1 laugh-out-loud novel of all time, worth every minute of effort---and the best critical intro is still Ellmann's relatively small but high-impact "Ulysses on the Liffey." Read that first and you'll instantly enjoy 90% of the tough parts. Still laughing about the Irishman dragged away for setting a cathedral on fire. "I'm bloody sorry I did it," says he, "but I declare to God I thought the archbishop was in there."

- How could you not love Leopold Bloom? He talks to his cat. He eats with relish the inner organs of beasts and fowls, which "give to his palate a fine tang of faintly scented urine". He wonders if it would be possible to cross Dublin without passing a pub. He surreptitiously observes the marble goddesses in the lobby of the National Museum to see if they have anuses. He buys pornographic novels for his wife, masturbates on a public beach without getting caught, and picks the winner at Ascot without even trying. The most endearing character in all literature.



message 26: by April (new)

April Munday | 277 comments I read The Odyssey this year and loved it. It moves along really well and is a great story.


message 27: by MK (new)

MK (wisny) | 2993 comments April wrote: "I read The Odyssey this year and loved it. It moves along really well and is a great story."

Thx, April :)

I read bits and excerpts back in high school, as I expect most did, but that's it. I'm looking forward to it. ... I think :p


message 28: by siriusedward (new)

siriusedward (elenaraphael) | 2011 comments MK wrote: "Katy wrote: "I've written off James Joyce, so good luck with those."

LOL !

shhhh don't scare me"



:)


message 29: by siriusedward (new)

siriusedward (elenaraphael) | 2011 comments Mrs Dalloway is somehow related to Odyssey?Did not know that.


message 30: by Petra (new)

Petra There are many levels in Ulysses. You can really go down rabbit holes while reading this or try to analyze and fret yourself for "not getting it". But if you go with the flow of the basic story, it's a wonderful read. I have to admit that the first time through it takes time.
I suggest reading 10 or so pages a day. That will sometimes fly by quickly and other times be more difficult but it makes it doable.
I love Ulysses and have read it 3 times & listened to the audio once. It's very lyrical; the audio (40 discs!) is wonderful; very musical almost in its flow and smooth.

You've put together a great list.
The Odyssey is wonderful. Compare a couple of lines of the different translations on Amazon with the "look inside" feature to find the translation that speaks best to you.

Beowulf has a lot of chest thumping ("I am the best warrior") type of tall tales. It's kind of fun. A good companion book to Beowuld is Grendel, which tells the other side of the story.

I'm still debating whether to do this challenge again next year. I did poorly this year.


message 31: by MK (last edited Dec 07, 2018 08:50AM) (new)

MK (wisny) | 2993 comments siriusedward wrote: "Mrs Dalloway is somehow related to Odyssey?Did not know that."

It is! I learnt it sometime over the last year-and-a-half, too.
(but it is even more closely/directly related to Ulysses.)

Here's some bits from a quick google:
The intertextual world of Mrs. Dalloway
Thursday 14 January 2010 by William Patrick Wend

Woolf begins with one simple scheme: a woman’s “ordinary day…full of poetry and pathos, tragedy and comedy.” Woolf uses intertextual citation to enrich her novel with Homer’s Odyssey, but also the Iliad, Aristotle’s Poetics, and other classic Greek writing.

Originally, and borrowed recently by Michael Cunningham for his own novel of the same name, Mrs. Dalloway was going to be called The Hours. As Molly Hoff has noted, this working title suggests Homer’s Odyssey. The Latin word for hour is “hora,” which comes from the Greek and can also mean very finite concepts like “spring” or a complete day.

Odysseus’ journey home takes 10 years; Clarissa’s return to “life” takes a bit over 10 hours. One could argue that her rebirth is analogous to the Persephone/Demeter myth in the Homeric Hymns as well.

Mrs. Dalloway and The Odyssey also have in the common how they interact with time. Both narratives begin in the present, in medias res, but use flashbacks to engage with past.

Other characters also share traits with the Epic Cycle. Like the opening lines of the Odyssey where Athena notes that Odysseus is currently tangled up with Calypso, the return of Peter Walsh from India comes with the announcement via Lady Burton, who Hoff refers to as an “androgynous Athena” that he “is in trouble with some woman.”

more ... https://bloggingwoolf.wordpress.com/2...


Mrs. Dalloway and Joyce's Ulysses

In setting her novel on a single day in a city in June in a city through which various characters walk while we listen in on their thought, Woolf is obviously alluding to Joyce's Ulysses, which had been published in 1922 and which she was reading that summer that Mrs. Dalloway began to take shape. Ulysses is set on June 16, 1904, in Dublin, and is told primarily through the thoughts of two main characters, Leopold Bloom and Stephen Daedalus, whose lives intersect in complicated ways. Daedalus is a young man much like Joyce himself, and Bloom may be seen as a father figure for him.

Woolf didn't much like Ulysses, or at least didn't appreciate what Joyce was after (see her diary entries for August 26 and September 3 and 6, 1922), perhaps because it is such a 'masculinist' novel in which women are seen primarily as sexual, reproductive beings about whom the male characters obsess. (Woolf doesn't say this in her diary that summer. She just says it's 'pretentious, very obscure, tricky, and that a good writer doesn't get so into doing stunts. I'm inferring the feminist critique from my own prejudices!) But something about the structure must have struck a chord with her, perhaps somehow giving her license to indulge her gift for detail.

Or perhaps she (unconsciously?) decided to show him how a great writer would address major themes in a novel set on a single day and following several characters' peregrinations around a city. Ulysses is written on a grand scale, a huge book that indulges Joyce's love of word play and multiple levels of literary allusion, the primary one being to Homer's Odyssey. Mrs. Dalloway is a short book (under 200 pages), but a very rich one, a book in which small incidents reverberate (and sometimes recur) with meaning. Parts of it may test our understanding on a first reading (who is the Septimus Warren Smith and what is he doing in this book??), but it is not obscure. Once you grasp that Septimus is a doppelganger or double for Clarissa, then things begin to open up as you look at them in comparison to each other. Most of what can be learned from this novel can be learned directly from what is one the page, requiring little or no recourse to literary allusion to narratives outside the novel, unlike Ulysses, which cannot fully be understood without a key. This is not to say that scholars haven't dug out some pretty obscure allusions in Mrs. Dalloway, including the source of the song sung by the old woman begging in the street ('ee um fah um so,' MD 82; see Hillis Miller, 'Repetition as the Raising of the Dead'). But the novel is not deliberately obscure, but rather in some respects may at first appear deceptively simple.

more: https://www.uah.edu/woolf/lecture3_04...


Virginia Woolf’s Mrs. Dalloway
Invisible Presences
CLEMSON UNIVERSITY DIGITAL PRESS
by Molly Hof


(from the Introduction... )

Mrs. Dalloway languishes in the shadow of and in response to James Joyce’s Ulysses, a mock-epic version of Homer’s epic, The Odyssey. Latin elegy, instead, prefers to treat exclusively of love, not epic. The love interest in elegy is Cynthia, Delia, Corinna, or life itself as the case for each poet may be and the poems that vitalize them. For the elegiac poet, writing about love and writing about writing indicate much the same thing. Similarly, Mrs.
Dalloway, a mock-elegy, treats writing about heroic concepts satirically as a perennially erotic matter. Virginia Woolf implies that instead of composing long Iliads, paraphrasing the elegist (Propertius 2.34.1), something greater than Ulysses is being born.

The most obvious statement of its area of concern is Mrs. Dalloway’s own interest with life—vita in Latin. “What she liked was simply life. ‘Th at’s what I do it for,’ she said, speaking aloud, to life.” While always equivocating between the name of the character and the name of the book, like Propertius, Mrs. Dalloway becomes truly the longest love letter in history.

(1 of 138 references to "Odyssey" in the text ... )

... The tire as a bag of wind suggests the Homeric episode conserning the bag of wind given to Odysseus ( Odyssey 10), and the allusion in Joyce’s Ulysses, “Aeolus.” The same reference applies to the man with the leather bag ending the next chapter. Th e explosion ricochets all the way into Clarissa’s party as the component she requires for the success of the event when Ralph Lyon beats back the curtain with the birds of paradise on them, as
if his fart caused the event. It’s the fart that gets the notice, not the curtain. The pistol shot forms a segue reaching into the next section. “Each chapter gains from the one before it or adds to the one that follows it” (CR 103).

more: https://tigerprints.clemson.edu/cgi/v...



message 32: by MK (new)

MK (wisny) | 2993 comments Petra wrote: "There are many levels in Ulysses. You can really go down rabbit holes while reading this or try to analyze and fret yourself for "not getting it". But if you go with the flow of the basic story, it.... I'm still debating whether to do this challenge again next year. I did poorly this year. ..."

Thankyou, Petra! Great tips and advice :).

On the debate, I say go for it.

I haven't yet, but I plan to edit a second post before the 31st with an 'easier' threshhold for success for myself. I'm going to give myself 2 alternates in each category (Old School, New School, and Wildcards). That means to 'succeed', I'll only need a 66% passing grade ;-). I think that might be a better idea for me, personally. I'll undertake it a sub-challenge, a personal challenge, if you will, but without setting up a new post for it :D

I'm still going to try for the 12 + 2, but it seems very challenging, indeed, to me!


message 33: by Erin (new)

Erin (erinm31) | 609 comments Petra wrote: "There are many levels in Ulysses. You can really go down rabbit holes while reading this or try to analyze and fret yourself for "not getting it". But if you go with the flow of the basic story, it..."

I love your descriptions of these! Really want to read them as well!


message 34: by MK (new)

MK (wisny) | 2993 comments Erin wrote: "I started Ulysses last year and hope to start it again and maybe finish next year... or maybe just Dubliners next year and I’ll save Ulysses for 2020... I think I’ve read that Dubliners is easier to read and so might be a good introduction to his style and comes in short-story chunks! 😂

Good luck with your challenge! "


Thankyou, Erin! Sorry, I missed your post earlier. The two Joyce titles are closely related, you could be right about Dubliners being a simpler introduction. I hope I'll find out this next year! :)


message 35: by MK (new)

MK (wisny) | 2993 comments Ahhhhhhh ..... Beowulf!

This sounds a bit scarier than I first anticipated :-p.
I read a Folk Tale anthology by an author I liked, and it turned out he did a Beowulf translation too, so I was thinking that might be a good one to check out next year.

However! ... in browsing Kindle daily deals today (btw, all things Tolkien are on daily deal today), there is a translation of Beowulf by Tolkien, that was just recently published (40 yrs after his death!).

Doing a google, it turns out this is a big fat controversy. Folks say it should never have been published. It was just notes Tolkien made to help his students (he taught a course on Beowulf for years).

hmmmm, may have to rethink Beowulf. Funny, tho, these stories, including up to Virginia Wolf's all seem linked. One of the articles mention a course on literature, "From Beowulf to Virginia Wolf":
"... London’s Evening Standard ends its breezy piece on the translation by quoting the famous line in Annie Hall: “Just don’t take any class where you have to read Beowulf.” Neither Woody Allen, who took college courses in communications and film, nor Alvy Silver, his neurotic comedian in Annie Hall, ever “read”, much less translated, Beowulf in Old English. The joke is a well-understood allusion to the ubiquitous Survey of English Literature from Beowulf to Virginia Woolf. These surveys have introduced generations of undergraduate students to the first great long poem in English through a literal, artless, tedious, prose translation, so cumbersome that some traumatised students leave this introductory course believing that they have read Beowulf in the original.

link - http://theconversation.com/publishing...



A couple articles on the Tolkien translation:

Publishing Tolkien’s Beowulf translation does him a disservice
May 29, 2014 1.20am EDT
http://theconversation.com/publishing...

Why Tolkien’s Beowulf is an ‘amazing book but a terrible translation’
undated
http://www.medievalists.net/2015/11/w...


"Heaneywulf" sounds interesting :p -

The lofty metre of Beowulf is lost even in admirable poetic versions like Seamus Heaney’s, which is recognised as a new poem, often called Heaneywulf. Prose translations such as Tolkien’s claim to be more “faithful”, but this fidelity refers to the literal translation of poetry, which captures only the facts of the story in unavoidably stodgy prose, struggling to sort out the word order while losing the grandeur of verse.

(from the first linked article)
)


message 36: by Lynn, Revisit the Shelf (new)

Lynn (lynnsreads) | 2914 comments Mod
Well I am very impressed with your Old School list, and readily admit that I have not read any. I have read about half of your want a be, mind candies though!!! LOL. I hope it is lots of fun for you!


message 37: by MK (new)

MK (wisny) | 2993 comments Lynn wrote: "Well I am very impressed with your Old School list, and readily admit that I have not read any. I have read about half of your want a be, mind candies though!!! LOL. I hope it is lots of fun for you!"

Thanks! I hope so too :D


message 38: by MK (last edited Feb 10, 2019 01:10AM) (new)

MK (wisny) | 2993 comments MK wrote: ".
POST #1 - MK's Official Rules Challenge!
Need 12 out of 14 to succeed!!

"Official Rules, Read 12 out of 14 Pre-chosen, No Take-backsies, Three plus Three plus Six plus Only Two Wild Cards Total!, Success with 86% Read-rate!, Books!"
For Tracking Progress ... "Official-Rules Challenge!"
(see post #3 for list of challenge books)

...
1. The Martian - Robinson Crusoe in space!
The Martian by Andy Weir by Andy Weir
The Martian by Andy Weir *
4.40 avg rating — 658,750 ratings — published 2012
MK's rating: it was amazing * * * * *
Six days ago, astronaut Mark Watney became one of the first people to walk on Mars.
Now, he's sure he'll be the first person to die there.
After a dust storm nearly kills him and forces his crew to evacuate while thinking him dead, Mark finds himself stranded and completely alone with no way to even signal Earth t ...more
...."


I finished one of my 'TBRs for pleasure' books.
This is the same slot on both my 'official rules' challenge, and on my 'duffer level' challenge ;-).

OMG ... sooooooo good. Want to see the movie now.


message 39: by Bob, Short Story Classics (new)

Bob | 4850 comments Mod
I have been wanting to read The Martian. One of these days I will find the perfect used copy.


message 40: by MK (new)

MK (wisny) | 2993 comments Bob, it's great :)


message 41: by MK (last edited Mar 09, 2019 04:59PM) (new)

MK (wisny) | 2993 comments Starting out Old School (well, Alternate, really), with Beowulf.

I have a million versions of it to get started ;-). Okay, not a million, but quite a few. I checked out some kid versions, some graphic novel versions, and I own 2 kindle versions. If I manage to get through some/most of them, and feel like I understand it, I might try to tackle "Heaneywulf" at some point...

This was the one I thought I wanted, when I first put Beowulf on my list:

Beowulf by Kevin Crossley-Holland by Kevin Crossley-Holland

It's only 48 pages, and it was written for kids. I read an anothology by this author last year (The Young Oxford Book of Folk Tales), and liked his style of writing very much. On his author page, it mentioned he'd done a translation of Beowulf for kids, so that's how Beowulf ended up on my list in the first place.

Anyway, when I tried to borrow that book, I got an older version, not for kids (I think? not sure, haven't read it yet), along with another version. So I went back to the library catalog and just checked out a bunch more, including the version I first wanted (which had to be borrowed from my state-wide system, as my library didn't have it).

I also have 2 kindle versions I'd purchased, one back in 2017, and one in 2018.

Rounding up the books!

Kid versions:

Beowulf by Kevin Crossley-Holland Beowulf by Rosemary Sutcliff Kid Beowulf and the Blood-Bound Oath by Alexis E. Fajardo Beowulf the Warrior by Ian Serraillier Beowulf by Michael Morpurgo


√ 1. Beowulf,
by Kevin Crossley-Holland, illustrated by Charles Keeping
(Borrowed from my state-wide library catalog.)

√ 2. Beowulf,
by Rosemary Sutcliff, also illustrated by Charles Keeping
(Borrowed from my library.)

√ 3. Kid Beowulf and the Blood-Bound Oath,
by Alexis E. Fajardo (graphic novel, 1st of a trilogy)
(Borrowed from my state-wide library catalog. My library did have it, but it turned up 'missing' when I put it on hold.)

√ 4. Beowulf the Warrior,
by Ian Serraillier, illustrated by Mark Severin
(This is another re-telling for kids, It's another one I don't own, but my library has it. I might borrow it after I'm done, we'll see.
From the author bio: "Ian Serraillier was a British novelist and poet. He was also appreciated by children for being a storyteller retelling legends from Rome, Greece and England. Serraillier was best known for his children's books, especially The Silver Sword (1956), a wartime adventure story which was adapted for television by the BBC in 1957 and again in 1971.)"

√ 5. Beowulf, by Michael Morpurgo
(This is another kids' version, mentioned in an article I came across. So far, the kids' versions by Crossley-Holland has been my favorite, I'm not sure if it's because of the prose, the illustrations, or the particular author, so I wanted to try another kids' illustrated prose version to see what it was that I liked.)

Graphic novel versions:

Beowulf by Gareth Hinds The Graphic Canon, Vol. 1 From the Epic of Gilgamesh to Shakespeare to Dangerous Liaisons (The Graphic Canon #1) by Russ Kick Kid Beowulf and the Blood-Bound Oath by Alexis E. Fajardo

√ 1. Beowulf,
by Gareth Hinds (a trilogy bound into 1 volume)
(Borrowed from my library.)

2. The Graphic Canon, Vol. 1: From the Epic of Gilgamesh to Shakespeare to Dangerous Liaisons,
by Russ Kick (and many contributors) - I borrowed this one b/c of Beowulf, it came up when I searched the title.
(Borrowed from my library.)

√ 3. Kid Beowulf and the Blood-Bound Oath
(same as linked above in the 'Kid Versions')

Kindle versions:

Beowulf An Updated Verse Translation by Unknown Beowulf A Translation and Commentary by Unknown

√ 1. Beowulf: An Updated Verse Translation,
by Unknown, Translated by Frederick Rebsamen
(This is a kindle version I purchased on sale back on April 8, 2017. 'A verse translation of the first great narrative poem in the English language that captures the feeling and tone of the original.' I don't know anything about it, but I'd been wanting to read Beowulf for a number of years, when I saw it on a sale, I picked it up,)

√ 2. Beowulf: A Translation and Commentary,
by Unknown, Translated by J.R.R. Tolkien, Edited by Christopher Tolkien
(This is a kindle version I purchased on sale just a couple mos ago, on December 8, 2016. This is a controversial edition published very recently, post-posthumously, of course. Not supposedly the best version, not meant at all to be a 'translation' for public consumption, but more like notes he used in a course he taught for years, on the epic Beowulf.)


Other versions:

Beowulf by Unknown Beowulf by Unknown Beowulf by Unknown Beowulf A New Verse Translation by Unknown Beowulf, and The Fight at Finnsburg by Unknown Grendel by John Gardner Kid Beowulf and the Song of Roland by Alexis E. Fajardo Kid Beowulf and the Rise of El Cid by Alexis E. Fajardo Beowulf A Prose Translation by Unknown Beowulf by Chris Ryall

√ 1. Beowulf,
by K.C-. Holland
(This is Kevin Crossley-Holland, the author of the kid's version that first caught my eye. This isn't a kids' version tho, and it's from the 60s, instead of the 90s, not sure what it is, but this is what I borrowed from my library when attempting to borrow the later kids' version.)

2. Beowulf: The Donaldson Translation, Backgrounds and Sources, Criticism, by E. Talbot Donaldson (Translator), Joseph E. Tuso (Editor)
(Same as the reason for #5 of the kids' versions - But I wanted to try an adult prose version, to see if it's the prose that I prefer. Hm, actually, this is the 1975 1st edition of the Norton's Critical Edition, I had listed the 1998 2nd edition earlier (now #9 in this list), but only the 1st edition was available when I borrowed from the library.)

3. Beowulf, by Kevin Crossley-Holland
(I've read a 1999 kids prose version by him, and a 1968 unabridged verse translation by him, they are both my favorites so far. He has a new unabridged verse translation just published in 2008, I wanted to give it a look-see.)

4. Beowulf: A New Verse Translation,
by Unknown, Translated by Seamus Heaney
(This is 'Heaneywulf', supposed to be so very good, it's its own thing, completely separate from every other translation or rendition. This is the 'grown-up' version I might read, after I've read as many kid/graphic/other versions as I make my way through. This is another one I don't own, but my library has it. I might borrow it after I'm done, we'll see.)

5. Beowulf and the Fight at Finnsburgh,
by Unknown, Friedrich Klaeber
(Until Heaney, this was the 'gold-standard' translation. It also includes "The Fight at Finnsburg" fragment, which is referred to in Beowulf, and is pretty famous, too.
My library has the 1950 edition in its collection.)

6. Grendel,
by John Gardner
(This is a re-telling ... but from the POV of literature's first monster :-o ... it's in my library's collection. If I'm not heartily sick of Beowulf by the time I've read thru my feast, I may check this out. We'll see..
Book description: "The first and most terrifying monster in English literature, from the great early epic Beowulf, tells his side of the story in a book William Gass called "one of the finest of our contemporary fictions.".)

7. Kid Beowulf and the Song of Roland by Alexis E. Fajardo
(Volume 2 of "Kid Beowulf" graphic novel series.)

8. Kid Beowulf and the Rise of El Cid by Alexis E. Fajardo
(Volume 3 of "Kid Beowulf" graphic novel series.)

9*. Beowulf: A Prose Translation,
by Unknown translated by Unknown
(This is the only prose translation for grownups in this assortment. I'd like to see if it's the prose I like, or the kids' versions I like, because my two favorites so far are the two kids prose versions :). It's not in my library's collection, but I can borrow it from my state-wide catalog.
Book description: "The text of this edition of Beowulf is based on the highly regarded Donaldson prose translation of the Anglo-Saxon epic poem. Accurate and literally faithful, the Donaldson translation conveys the full meaning and spirit of the original. "Backgrounds and Contexts" provides readers with the historical, linguistic, and literary settings of Beowulf, including Robert C. Hughes ...more
*This is the 1998 2nd edition of Norton's Critical Editions, when I requested the title from my state-wide catalog, only the 1975 1st edition (now #2 in this list) was available.)

10*. Beowulf,
by Chris Ryall
(Graphic Novel - This is 'A special adaptation of the big-screen retelling of the ancient myth from filmmakers Neil Gaiman, Roger Avary and Robert Zemeckis!'. I don't own this, and haven't borrowed it, but I might be interested after I'm done, The big-screen retelling, too! :D It is in my home library's collection.
* moved from spot#2 to bottom of list, not sure anymore, but we'll see ...)

I think I have enough to keep me busy for the next few months! *grin*


Original post -

MK wrote: "Ahhhhhhh ..... Beowulf!

This sounds a bit scarier than I first anticipated :-p.
I read a Folk Tale anthology by an author I liked, and it turned out he did a Beowulf translation too, so I was thinking ... (more in spoiler tags)(view spoiler)



message 42: by Sara, Old School Classics (new)

Sara (phantomswife) | 4811 comments Mod
When you finish all of those you can write your own book..."Everything you wanted to know about Beowulf but didn't know enough to ask"


message 43: by MK (last edited Feb 19, 2019 10:06AM) (new)

MK (wisny) | 2993 comments Sara wrote: "When you finish all of those you can write your own book..."Everything you wanted to know about Beowulf but didn't know enough to ask""

I finished 2 of them so far. (Super quick reads, one only 48 pages, the other something around 98, can't remember, but those include large typeset, and illustrations *grin*). I gotta say, I'm glad I started with kids books :D. You know, those old epic tales were told over and over again, so way back when, people were well familiar with the stories by the time they got around to the 'grown up versions'. So, you know, that's my rationale :D


Beowulf is a great story, btw! I had this idea that is was bloody and gory and bawdy and gross. Maybe I'm mixing it up with Gilgamesh in my head? Not sure, haven't read that one yet, either.

Beowulf, at least the kids' versions, is a heroic, pretty great adventure tale.


message 44: by MK (new)

MK (wisny) | 2993 comments PS - btw, I think Beowulf is where some 'fantasy tropes' originate, ie the magical blade forged by dwarves that can kill beasts who are immune to human-forged weapons; the dragon hoarding gold who knows if one piece of its golden treasure hoard has been stolen ...


message 45: by Sara, Old School Classics (new)

Sara (phantomswife) | 4811 comments Mod
I agree modern day fantasy is a direct descendant of folk legend and fairytales. I read both Beowulf and Gilgamesh in college, but I hate to admit to remembering little about either. I do recall that I loved the atmosphere in Beowulf.


message 46: by MK (new)

MK (wisny) | 2993 comments Sara wrote: "I agree modern day fantasy is a direct descendant of folk legend and fairytales. I read both Beowulf and Gilgamesh in college, but I hate to admit to remembering little about either. I do recall th..."

cool


message 47: by Bob, Short Story Classics (new)

Bob | 4850 comments Mod
I read the Seamus Heaney translation. I enjoyed the story, but I don't plan to ever revisit it, or other translations. My hats off professor.


message 48: by MK (new)

MK (wisny) | 2993 comments Bob wrote: "I read the Seamus Heaney translation. I enjoyed the story, but I don't plan to ever revisit it, or other translations. My hats off professor."

lol I just finished the third one, the first 'grown up' one, a graphic novel.

I think if I started with Heaney, that'd be it. I'm just working my way up to Heaney ... Professor ;-)


message 49: by Erin (new)

Erin (erinm31) | 609 comments MK wrote: "Sara wrote: "When you finish all of those you can write your own book..."Everything you wanted to know about Beowulf but didn't know enough to ask""

I finished 2 of them so far. (Super quick reads..."


That sounds a good strategy! If you decide to similarly tackle ‘The Iliad,’ I remember liking Rosemary Sutcliff’s retelling, Black Ships Before Troy.

How many versions of Beowulf are you planning to read this year?!


message 50: by MK (last edited Feb 20, 2019 08:22PM) (new)

MK (wisny) | 2993 comments Erin wrote: "That sounds a good strategy! If you decide to similarly tackle ‘The Iliad,’ I remember liking Rosemary Sutcliff’s retelling, Black Ships Before Troy.

How many versions of Beowulf are you planning to read this year?! "


On the last, I'll let you know after I read the first 'grown up' version ;-). I finished the front matter/intro to one of the versions earlier today. I was going to read the front matter on another version, before I read the text in either. Still not sure which text I'll read first, one is a version from the same author of the kids version that I read first, but written 3 decades earlier (not a kids version) - he recommends it be read aloud, and not to silently to yourself :D. The other is an updated modern verse (not Heaney).

And, I think so, on The Iliad. I have that book (Black Ships Before Troy on the top of my pile, on my desk, right now! I purchased a used copy about a month ago. It may have been from you mentioning it - someone did, I think :). I liked Sutcliff's writing in her Beowulf retelling. That was the second kids version I read. After Beowulf, The Iliad was the next one of the Old School books that I wanted to read. May take a break for some other types of reading first, tho.


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