Catching up on Classics (and lots more!) discussion

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2019 Quest for Women Authors > Pink's 2019 Quest for Women Authors

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message 1: by Pink (last edited Jun 04, 2019 11:21PM) (new)


message 2: by Pink (last edited Aug 10, 2019 02:17AM) (new)

Pink | 6556 comments My Decade Challenge -1920s

✔️1920- The Age of Innocence by *Edith Wharton ★★★★★
✔️1921- Monday or Tuesday by *Virginia Woolf ★★
✔️1922- One of Ours by *Willa Cather ★★★
✔️1923- Whose Body? by Dorothy L. Sayers ★ DNF
✔️1924- Complete Stories by Dorothy Parker ★★★★
1925- The Making of Americans by Gertrude Stein
✔️1926- The Murder of Roger Ackroyd by Agatha Christie ★★★
✔️1927- Miss Sophie's Diary and Other Stories by Ding Ling ★★
✔️1928- Machinal by Sophie Treadwell ★★★
✔️1929- Passing by Nella Larsen ★★★★

*Authors I've read before


message 3: by Pink (last edited Dec 04, 2018 04:13AM) (new)

Pink | 6556 comments Century challenge ideas

1710-1719 (If I don't find a book for 1810s)

1730-1739

1760-1769

1770-1779

1790-1799
Love and Friendship by Jane Austen 1793
Maria: or, The Wrongs of Woman by Mary Wollstonecraft 1798
The Italian by Ann Radcliffe 1797
Charlotte Temple by Susanna Rowson 1790
A Simple Story by Elizabeth Inchbald 1791
The Coquette by Hannah Webster Foster 1797
Celestina by Fernando de Rojas 1791

1810-1819 Sandition by Jane Austen (unfinished at her death, but unpublished until 1925) 1817


message 4: by Sue (new)

Sue K H (sky_bluez) | 3183 comments Great list so far Pink. I'm going to put Passing on my list for 1929. It sounds really good!


message 5: by Pink (new)

Pink | 6556 comments I've had passing on my list for ages and I know it's available on Project Gutenberg and Librivox (read by one of my favourite narrators) but I still haven't got around to it yet. Including it on a challenge will hopefully give me the push I need.


message 6: by Pink (new)

Pink | 6556 comments If anyone has any suggestions, especially for my century challenge I'd be very grateful. I'm excited to read the books I've already selected, but I need to fill in the missing decades and seem to have only a few books to choose from for these years.


message 7: by Bob, Short Story Classics (new)

Bob | 4913 comments Mod
For your century challenge, my bookshelf is pretty bare when looking for anything from the 18th century. As for the 1920’s, I can offer a few choices.

1922-The Velveteen Rabbit
1922-The Secret Adversary
1923-The Murder on the Links
1925-The Professor's House
1926-The Murder of Roger Ackroyd
1927-To the Lighthouse
1927-Death Comes for the Archbishop

A little heavy on Christy, what can I say I'm a fan.


message 8: by Aubrey (last edited Dec 03, 2018 11:20AM) (new)

Aubrey (korrick) | 2517 comments I have Charlotte Temple by Susanna Rowson for the 1790's (not the best rated, but it's definitely got good reading cred) and Kelroy by Rebecca Rush for the 1810s (better rated but as of yet unowned by me).

For decade (Apologies if you've read any of these or if any are redundant. I have too much Woolf for my own good):

1921 - Mrs. Dalloway (5 stars from me), A Haunted House and Other Short Stories (unread) - Virginia Woolf
1922 - Jacob's Room - Virginia Woolf (4 stars)
The Enchanted April - Elizabeth von Arnim (3 stars)
1923 - The Lost Lunar Baedeker: Poems of Mina Loy - Mina Loy (4 stars)
1924 - Precious Bane - Mary Webb (unread)
1925 - The Common Reader - Virginia Woolf (unread)
The Making of Americans - Gertrude Stein (unread)
Reminiscences of a Student's Life - Jane Ellen Harrison (unread)
1926 - Lolly Willowes - Sylvia Townsend Warner (3 stars)
1927 - Death Comes for the Archbishop - Willa Cather (3 stars)
The House Without Windows - Barbara Newhall Follett (unread)
To the Lighthouse - Virginia Woolf (5 stars)
1928 - Orlando - Virginia Woolf (5 stars)
Quicksand - Nella Larsen (5 stars)


message 9: by Pink (new)

Pink | 6556 comments Thank you Bob and Aubrey for your suggestions. I think I’ll add some works by Willa Cather, Agatha Christie and Virginia Woolf, though I’ll have to see which titles to slot where! I’ll look up the other titles, as there are some books I’ve never heard of, which is always exciting!


message 10: by Terris (new)

Terris | 2432 comments Pink wrote: "I've had passing on my list for ages and I know it's available on Project Gutenberg and Librivox (read by one of my favourite narrators) but I still haven't got around to it yet. Including it on a ..."

I don't know "Passing" but I do know that Elizabeth Klett is one of my favorite LibriVox narrators. So I might add that one to my list just for the wonderful reader alone! Although now that I look at the description, the story does look pretty good! Thanks for the rec :)


message 11: by Laurie (last edited Dec 03, 2018 07:00PM) (new)

Laurie | 1631 comments I don't have suggestions for your century that I have read but here are a few that would fit.
1720 Love in Excess by Eliza Fowler Haywood
1784 Letters of Mistress Henley Published by Her Friend by Isabelle de Charrière
1791 A Simple Story by Elizabeth Inchbald
1797 The Coquette by Hannah Webster Foster

And for the decade
1921 Purple Springs by Nellie L. McClung
1922 Claudine's House by Colette
1925 Bread Givers by Anzia Yezierska


message 12: by Erin (new)

Erin (erinm31) | 609 comments Another possibility for the 1790’s is Celestina by Charlotte Turner Smith. I’ve not read it.

Good luck! You’ve chosen a very challenging century!


message 13: by Marina (new)

Marina (sonnenbarke) Pink, I'm looking forward to knowing what you think of The Female Quixote. I wanted to read it this year but got carried away by other books, just as usual ;) I hope I'll be able to get to it next year.


message 14: by Erin (new)

Erin (erinm31) | 609 comments Phillis Wheatley published her poetry during the 1770’s, in particular, Poems on Various Subjects, Religious and Moral in 1773.


message 15: by Pink (new)

Pink | 6556 comments Plan complete! Phew, what a lot of books that I have no hope of completing. Never mind, it's still nice to plan and I've added some short stories and essays in there to help me through!


message 16: by Sara, Old School Classics (new)

Sara (phantomswife) | 5044 comments Mod
What an interesting list! I will be watching to see how you like them.


message 17: by Aubrey (new)

Aubrey (korrick) | 2517 comments Pink wrote: "Plan complete! Phew, what a lot of books that I have no hope of completing. Never mind, it's still nice to plan and I've added some short stories and essays in there to help me through!"

Congrats, Pink! I'm still scrambling around mine, but I think my libraries will support me well enough.


message 18: by siriusedward (new)

siriusedward (elenaraphael) | 2052 comments Wow!Great list ,Pink.
Hope you enjoy reading them.
I loved One of ours and liked whose body?.


message 19: by Leni (new)

Leni Iversen (leniverse) | 1220 comments Wow, 18th Century! Hardcore.


message 20: by Pink (new)

Pink | 6556 comments Thanks everyone. 18th century does feel hardcore, but I’ve based it around a few books I already have on my shelves and filled in the rest with some shorter options. I’m daunted already though!


message 21: by Erin (last edited Dec 11, 2018 07:20AM) (new)

Erin (erinm31) | 609 comments Pink wrote: "Thanks everyone. 18th century does feel hardcore, but I’ve based it around a few books I already have on my shelves and filled in the rest with some shorter options. I’m daunted already though!"

You can do it! 😃 I’m impressed you were able to find options for each of your decades in the 18th century!


message 22: by Kathleen (new)

Kathleen | 3804 comments Love your 18th century list, Pink. Definitely a challenge, but should be really interesting. Maria: or, The Wrongs of Woman (actually the one I read was Mary & The Wrongs of Woman) was fun, but I haven't read any of the others. Look forward to your thoughts!


message 23: by Bob, Short Story Classics (new)

Bob | 4913 comments Mod
You ended up with a great decade challenge, all look interesting.


message 24: by Pink (new)

Pink | 6556 comments Erin, it wasn’t easy to find all of my 18th century choices and some of them wouldn’t be my first choice, but it will be interesting to see what was being written and published by women during this period.

Kathleen, I don’t have a good track record with Mary Wollstonecraft. I like what she has to say, but not so much her style of saying it.

Thanks Bob, I’m excited about my decades challenge now I’ve included some big names that I’ve been wanting to read.


message 25: by Susan O (new)

Susan O (sozmore) Looks great Pink. You did some work finding the 18th century choices. I think I tried a couple of years ago and still had gaps. Good luck.


message 26: by Pink (new)

Pink | 6556 comments Thanks Susan, I just need to read them now!


message 27: by Pink (new)

Pink | 6556 comments In January I read one book for each of my century and decade challenges.

Reflections on the Seven Days of the Week which wasn't enjoyable for me, but was quick to get through and a nice reflection of what women were writing in 1770.

One of Ours which I enjoyed, but didn't love. I certainly liked it more than Cather's My Antonia.


message 28: by Leni (new)

Leni Iversen (leniverse) | 1220 comments You've made an excellent start! And you have so many interesting books on that list, good days to come!


message 29: by Pink (new)

Pink | 6556 comments Thanks Leni :)

I’ve completed another book for my century challenge, Fantomina; or, Love in a Maze from 1724 and it was a cracker! 4 stars


message 30: by Pink (new)

Pink | 6556 comments And another quick one today, Monday or Tuesday by Virginia Woolf I’m not a huge fan of her books, but I do appreciate her own unique writing style. You’d certainly guess the auther just from reading a passage or two. I’d recommend it for Woolf fans, or maybe as a good starting place. 2 stars, just ok for me.


message 31: by Pink (new)

Pink | 6556 comments I’ve finished The Age of Innocence for my decade challenge and it was so good! Why did I wait this long?! 4.5 stars


message 32: by Kathleen (new)

Kathleen | 3804 comments I'm so glad you liked this one, Pink. What did you think of the ending? I read it years ago and still remember how it affected me.


message 33: by Pink (new)

Pink | 6556 comments Well the ending was a little strange for me, as I listened on audiobook and it didn’t list the last chapter. So I thought things had finished once Ellen left for Paris and May made her announcement to Newland. I thought, oh he’s really trapped now and May has won after all, without even having to vocalise anything. Then the next chapter started, which was more of an epilogue I suppose. It had much the same result, with Newland making his decision to foresake Ellen. I thought it echoed the earlier chapter when he decided to leave when she didn’t turn around and look at him. Ellen knew both times that he had come to her, but he decided not to stay. Although throughout the book it was really Ellen who removed herself from his company, knowing the reality or their situation and not allowing him to risk it all and be subject to unscrupulous gossip. Ironic, as society supposed that Ellen was the unconventional one. In the end Newland was too much of a product of his era, still doing the right thing. Or, with a chance of a final meeting did he just not want to be disappointed, or to disappoint?


message 34: by Kathleen (new)

Kathleen | 3804 comments Oh, great thoughts. I wonder too about which of those was most driving him in the end. I think I lean on the side of too much of his era, and think maybe the years made him become more like that?

Love the echo that you pointed out!


message 35: by Pink (new)

Pink | 6556 comments Yes I think too much of the era and he became what society always intended he should be, but for one brief time he thought he could do without.


message 36: by Pink (new)

Pink | 6556 comments I tried to read Whose Body? by Dorothy L. Sayers but it wasn’t for me. I’m not a fan of Jeeves and Wooster and found this very similar. 1 star DNF


message 37: by Leni (new)

Leni Iversen (leniverse) | 1220 comments Oh no! Well, it’s ok that we don’t all like the same thing. Looking forward to hearing your verdict on Women in Love later this year. 🤣


message 38: by Pink (new)

Pink | 6556 comments Yep, it was about time I hit a book I didn’t like, I’ve had so many amazing reads so far this year. I’ll be sure to keep you updated about Lawrence!


message 39: by Pink (last edited Mar 19, 2019 03:10PM) (new)

Pink | 6556 comments I’ve completed my third book for the women’s century challenge and one that I’ve been meaning to read for a couple of years, The Adventures of David Simple by Sarah Fielding. I’m glad to have checked this off my list before I start her brother’s work, The History of Tom Jones, a Foundling next month.

Overall, I found this an enjoyable read, much in the same style as Don Quixote, or Gulliver’s Travels, but with more of a focus on society at the time, than any fantastical elements. I can see why it’s been largely forgotten, as the story isn’t polished and sometimes it rambled on with one adventure after another, seeming to forget the main tale. Although it’s better than other books I’ve read from this period, that have remained popular and in print. I think this is deserving of a wider audience. 3 stars.


message 40: by Kathleen (new)

Kathleen | 3804 comments You've got such a great assortment of early works here! Thanks for your thoughts, Pink. I'm a fan of Don Quixote, and now very curious about this one. I'll have to try it.


message 41: by Pink (last edited Apr 03, 2019 12:13PM) (new)

Pink | 6556 comments Another DNF for me, The History of Joseph: A Poem in Ten Books. I thought this was ok, but the poetry put me to sleep! It wasn’t bad, I just have a hard time with alternate ABAB rhyme schemes and find my mind wandering or head nodding.


message 42: by Pink (new)

Pink | 6556 comments I’ve finally finished another book from my decades challange, The Collected Dorothy Parker. It wasn’t the same collection of stories I planned to read and it was published much later than 1924, but it was very good. Dorothy Parker’s acerbic style shone through her work, both in short story form and her reviews. I skimmed some of the poems, but even that had some gems and I’m not a fan of poetry. Glad to have read this and it’s given me a taste for some other authors whose works she reviewed.

This makes me half way through both the century and decade challenge, so right on track for the year. Although some of the twenties books I picked are proving hard to get hold of without buying a copy.


message 43: by Aubrey (new)

Aubrey (korrick) | 2517 comments I'm not surprised you're having trouble, Pink. The only copy of 'The Making of Americans' I've come across fortuitously is a severely abridged one that doesn't make such abridgment obvious. I'm probably going to hold off on reading until I acquire something full unexpurgated, but it is rather annoying.


message 44: by Sue (new)

Sue K H (sky_bluez) | 3183 comments Pink wrote: "I’ve finally finished another book from my decades challange, The Collected Dorothy Parker. It wasn’t the same collection of stories I planned to read and it was published much later t..."

Congratulations on being half-way Pink! I'm having the same trouble with my 20's books being available without buying. I've started looking for alternates.


message 45: by Pink (new)

Pink | 6556 comments Aubrey wrote: "I'm not surprised you're having trouble, Pink. The only copy of 'The Making of Americans' I've come across fortuitously is a severely abridged one that doesn't make such abridgment obvious. I'm pro..."

I didn’t even know there were abridged versions around, I just knew my library didn’t have a copy. I’ll look out for this in the future, thanks for mentioning it.


message 46: by Pink (new)

Pink | 6556 comments Sue, I might do the same and swap books out, but I’ll leave those ones until last and see how I’m doing for time. Chances are I’ll finish the year incomplete, but that doesn’t bother me.


message 47: by Bob, Short Story Classics (new)

Bob | 4913 comments Mod
I read Parker earlier this year. She does have a unique style and I have enjoyed all that I've read so far.


message 48: by Sara, Old School Classics (last edited May 29, 2019 03:15PM) (new)

Sara (phantomswife) | 5044 comments Mod
Parker is an author I still need to read. I have read little excerpts and quotes, but never the real thing. Congrats, Pink, on being half-done already!


message 49: by Pink (new)

Pink | 6556 comments I’ve read another two books for my 1920s challenge. Passing by Nella Larsen which was a wonderful 4 star read and Miss Sophie's Diary and Other Stories by Ding Ling which was okay, but there wasn’t really enough for me to get into, so it’s hard to rate higher than 2 stars.


message 50: by Sara, Old School Classics (new)

Sara (phantomswife) | 5044 comments Mod
I also loved Passing. Congratulations on filling two more slots.


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