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Cryptonomicon > Chapters 59-64 Cryptonomicon

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message 1: by Linda (new)

Linda | 1378 comments The Hoard chapter was crazy! It was a bit long-winded, but I liked how Randy wrote it in a way to sound like a novel.

I'm in the middle of the Rocket chapter. Man, I'm just loving Bobby Shaftoe more and more. Some of his lines are just so funny because he just gets to the point.

So far I like this line:

This conspiracy thing is going to be a real pain in the ass if it means backing down from casual fistfights.

Lol. I also loved this bit:

"If I don't see you in Manila, let's get in touch after the war." He starts pounding his Shaftoe on the back, pulls some paper money out of his pocket, stuffs it into Shaftoe's hand.

"Goddamn it, you'll see me there," Shaftoe says. "What is this shit for?"

"I am tipping the nice Swedish boy who carried my baggage," Bischoff says.

Shaftoe sucks his teeth and grimaces. He can tell he is not cut out for this cloak-and-dagger nonsense.



message 2: by Linda (new)

Linda | 1378 comments Yes! There were three quotes I wanted to pull but then ran short on time typing because it was just after my lunch break. The “this is how I always answer the door” was the third quote I wanted to mention. Too funny!! 😂

Hmm... going back and looking at the titles for Horde, I kind of like the simple title My Trip to the Jungle, only because it sounds so innocent but then the story itself ends up being so over the top. I’m not sure what the title The Drums of the Huks means? Maybe I missed something in the story.

I liked Randy’s use of the acronym LAC to describe the time spent in the jungle. “Lewis And Clark” expedition days. :)


message 3: by Linda (new)

Linda | 1378 comments I just finished the Rocket chapter. Yeah, that was pretty awesome! I loved the part where Shaftoe pops up from the trap door into the middle of the cabin and takes care of the Germans. Also the conversation he has with Root regarding his relationship with the church being complicated and having to pretend that he is or is not sleeping with Julieta.

Randy helping Blanket Man to the Mercedes. Is this Root, do you think? I don't know who else it would be, but why would they fake Root's death? But on the other hand, I don't see Root being able to walk out to the car on his own having just had major surgery. Maybe I missed a clue as to who that was.


message 4: by Linda (new)

Linda | 1378 comments Lorna wrote: "There were some graphes that I missed by listening on audio. But would not have been able to understand anyway."

You are not missing much with the graphs. They were pretty simple and basically had shaded areas which indicated that Lawrence was unable to break codes because his mind was not clear. I thought this part was pretty funny, especially when he realized that his life was not running as a linear equation, but instead had turned into a differential equation with the added Factor of Mary Smith Proximity. :D


message 5: by Linda (new)

Linda | 1378 comments INRI chapter - that poor motorcycle driver!! That was unexpected and brutal. :(


So, Father Ferdinand is apparently a member of this Societas Eruditorum that Rudy spoke of. I’m curious what that is all about.


message 6: by Rosemary (last edited Dec 07, 2018 05:48AM) (new)

Rosemary Linda wrote: "Randy helping Blanket Man to the Mercedes. Is this Root, do you think? I don't know who else it would be, but why would they fake Root's death? But on the other hand, I don't see Root being able to walk out to the car on his own having just had major surgery. Maybe I missed a clue as to who that was."

I think it's Root, and Root has superpowers. Or maybe the major surgery didn't really happen - they all pretended he was much more badly injured than he was.


message 7: by Rosemary (new)

Rosemary Linda wrote: "INRI chapter - that poor motorcycle driver!! That was unexpected and brutal. :( "

I know, right! That was horrible! And Goto didn't react ... I suppose he's just seen so many horrors by this point, he is blind to them.


message 8: by Marie (new)

Marie | 83 comments Linda wrote: "The Hoard chapter was crazy! It was a bit long-winded, but I liked how Randy wrote it in a way to sound like a novel.

I'm in the middle of the Rocket chapter. Man, I'm just loving Bobby Shaftoe m..."


I really liked Hoard as well. I thought it was a nice change of pace to have the story develop by retelling events in the form of a letter.


message 9: by Marie (new)

Marie | 83 comments Lorna wrote: "Rocket was an awesome chapter and Linda had a lot of good quotes the only one I would add would be when Enoch Root comes over and Shaftoe grabs a gun and sneaks out to see who it is then says to root "This is how I always open the door,"
"


I loved that quote by Shaftoe too.


message 10: by Marie (new)

Marie | 83 comments My favorite part was the ending of this section where Lawrence is consumed with a mission to tell Turing how to make electric memory after mathematically using the old organ to play Bach. He walks out of the church without his shoes and hardly notices Mary on his way out. I think it was my favorite chapter with Lawrence.

I also liked the part where Lawrence's shoes were described as tourniquets.

"By the time he gets there he is pretty sure that they are functioning as tourniquets preventing uncontrollable arterial bleeding from the wounds they've induced." page 549.

I know that feeling all too well. I have several pairs of shoes in my closet that make my feet feel like this. It is to the point where I have started considering making my own shoes and even crocheted my first pair of boots the other day, that I love.

They have a summer shoe pattern I am going to try next and if it turns out well, it might be the only shoe style I wear this coming summer.


message 11: by Linda (new)

Linda | 1378 comments Marie, that entire Organ chapter was pretty good, but the icing on top was that last bit that you mentioned about Lawrence being so focused on his vision of a computer that Mary instantly dropped way down the ladder. And perhaps later he would come back to her and give her some attention. Ha ha.


message 12: by Linda (new)

Linda | 1378 comments I don’t have the tourniquet problem with shoes as I dress very casually - athletic/hiking shoes or flip-flops are pretty much all my feet see. Oh, and slippers. :) I am thankful to have a job that does not require office attire.


message 13: by Marie (new)

Marie | 83 comments @linda you are lucky. Life is much easier when your feet are in a pair of comfortable shoes.


message 14: by Marie (new)

Marie | 83 comments @lorna personally, I think the magic circle is more difficult to learn than making a pair of shoes. If I can avoid making a magic circle, I will because you only need them when you need to close the circle tight, like in a beanie.

The shoes were a lot easier to make than some of the doily patterns I have tried. I love doilies and I have really come to respect the time and skill they take to make. One doily can take over a week to make.

The shoes took about a couple days and I had to start over a couple times, so that is really quick in comparison.


message 15: by Linda (new)

Linda | 1378 comments I only have limited experience crocheting, and that was when I was in elementary school. I taught myself how to knit via books and friends many years ago, but I put it down about 5 years ago, with a sock still on needles that needs to be finished ( and then it’s match made). I keep telling myself that I need to pick it up again, but I tend to hop around doing different crafts (embroidery came next).

Anyway, I was going to say after your mention of doilies, Marie, that I have a couple that were my grandmother’s and I look at them in awe because they are so beautiful and intricate. I would love to learn how to crochet so I can try my hand at creating one.


message 16: by Marie (new)

Marie | 83 comments I love embroidery too, Linda. I have a Pinterest board for all the things I would love to try at some point.

There are many similarities between crochet and embroidery charts so that if you know how to read one, it should be somewhat easy to read another.

Especially if you make a filet crochet doily, which uses a chart that can also be used for embroidery as well. They are beautiful too. I want to say filet crochet is reminiscent of the 1920’s, but I could be off.

I just know that at one point it was a quicker way to make lace-like items. It might be an easy way to transition from embroidery to crochet. :)


message 17: by Linda (new)

Linda | 1378 comments Marie wrote: "I love embroidery too, Linda. I have a Pinterest board for all the things I would love to try at some point. "

I do too, Marie! So many things to try, but there's never enough time. I started embroidering some designs meant for my daughter's Christmas stocking last year, but I never got it finished. And here it is a year later with Christmas a week away and I still have yet to pull it back out and try to finish it up.

Good to know about the similarity between crochet and embroidery charts. Thanks!


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