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The Gunpowder Plot: Terror and Faith in 1605
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The Gunpowder Plot (Dec 2018) > 3. Author's perspective

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message 1: by John (new)

John Seymour | 1859 comments Mod
3. What is Fraser's perspective on the conspirators? Is she sympathetic? Hostile? Are there any indications of her views of the Catholic faith?


Mariangel | 536 comments The author is sympathetic to the conspirators throughout the book, as can be seen when she talks about their courage, Catesby's magnetism, the sympathy that Digby awoke even during the trial and execution. Her perspective on the group is most clearly expressed in the very last paragraph of the book.

She also admires the families that harboured and helped priests, paid fines and did time in jail rather than attend the mandatory protestant services, specially the women.


Manuel Alfonseca | 1438 comments Mod
Mariangel wrote: "The author is sympathetic to the conspirators throughout the book, as can be seen when she talks about their courage, Catesby's magnetism, the sympathy that Digby awoke even during the trial and ex..."

Yes, this is true, but at the same time she calls them fanatics and does not exactly support the conspiration from the ethical point of view.


message 4: by Jill (new)

Jill A. | 666 comments I love her observation that the women, whom she clearly admires, made good use of being perceived as the "weaker sex".


Fonch | 1186 comments Jill wrote: "I love her observation that the women, whom she clearly admires, made good use of being perceived as the "weaker sex"."

I totally agree with Jill in this point. In the medieval age the women had an important role. We can see Reading to Regine Pernoud. In the modern age the catholic recusants women has a very important role in the protection of the catholic priest, and it is positive that Antonia Fraser recognized this fact.


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