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No Man of Woman Born > No Man of Woman born by Ana Mardoll

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message 1: by MeerderWörter (new)

MeerderWörter | 120 comments Mod
Hello everyone!

It is a new 2 months, and this means I get to introduce the new book for the next two months:
No Man of Woman Born by Ana Mardoll.

Since our last book was rather heavy, and really covered no light topics at all, I came to the conclusion that it is time for a lighter book.
No Man of Woman Born is a book written by a trans person herself, which retells fairytales, but while doing so gives them a trans makeover. What's even better, it shows characters being badasses, it shows characters living their everyday lives, it gives a few wowzers in between, and it's just a wonderful book with wonderful characters and the one thing I absolutely love about it is how it shows that being trans is not ONE MONOLITHIC EXPERIENCE, but that it's wonderfully diverse and beautiful!


Ana Mardoll is on Twitter @AnaMardoll.

I loved reading it, and I already look forward to reading it again with you all.


message 2: by Robert (new)

Robert Smart | 38 comments Sounds cool! :)


message 3: by Nadine (new)

Nadine ♥ (misshappyreading) | 32 comments Sounds pretty cool. I'll get my copy soon :D


message 4: by Laure (new)

Laure | 10 comments Is the title a Shakespearian reference? <3


message 5: by MeerderWörter (new)

MeerderWörter | 120 comments Mod
Laure wrote: "Is the title a Shakespearian reference? <3"

Hmmm, it's a phrase out of the book - I've never read Shakespeare, so I can't answer that question... a good question to ask Ana Mardoll though (we can do a Q&A again, I can DM her on Twitter if she is up for it)


message 6: by Robert (new)

Robert Smart | 38 comments My book should finally arrive on Wednesday. :)


message 7: by Pam (last edited Dec 17, 2018 04:09AM) (new)

Pam | 93 comments Laure wrote: "Is the title a Shakespearian reference? <3"

Not exactly a word for word copy, but IT IS an allusion to Shakespeare and others tales.

The closest approximation comes from McBeth, around act 5 when he gets a bit guilty about his actions yet so very close to having it all it starts to slip from his fingers.

"What’s the boy Malcolm?
Was he not born of woman? The spirits that know
All mortal consequences have pronounced me thus:
“Fear not, Macbeth. No man that’s born of woman
Shall e'er have power upon thee.” Then fly, false thanes..."

This idea is a clever way in which to give to prophecy, as it became the norm that all prophecies are actually riddles. Like in Tolkein's Lord of the Rings, the Witch King "couldn't be slain by the hands of man."

This offers the prophecied person some feeling of immortality or at least of a prideful invulnerability. But then there is always a way around it. In Tolkien this meant Eowyn can defeat the previously thought undefeatable. "Nazgûl: Hinder me? Thou fool. No living man may hinder me!

Éowyn: But no living man am I! You look upon a woman. Éowyn I am, Eomund's daughter. You stand between me and my lord and kin. Be gone, if you be not deathless! For living or dark undead, I will smite you, if you touch him."

And in McBeth, it's learned that McDuff was born via C-section, pulled from his mother's womb and not birthed in the traditional manner through the vagina. Sooo McBeth thinking his invulnerability meant nothing could harm him gets a wee bit of a comeuppance when his pride and anger and brutality lead others to revolt against him.

So... This whole phrase has its notes in fantasy as a way of taking down arrogance or usurping /fulfilling a prophecy. And it's normally fulfilled by someone of innocence and purity. Eowyn, who began to fight the Nazgul, not for honor or prestige but to save her uncle. And McDuff was the "True Scott" someone who was quiet and long to anger, reserved, respected, and who was able to get the
true king of Scotland (Malcolm) out of harm's way.

So it's use here in this book is a) a clever way of explaining the gender issues and b) continues shaping the idea that trans people are innocent and purewho just want to live their lives and aren't deviants or immoral for doing so.


message 8: by MeerderWörter (new)

MeerderWörter | 120 comments Mod
Pam wrote: "Laure wrote: "Is the title a Shakespearian reference?

Not exactly a word for word copy, but IT IS an allusion to Shakespeare and others tales.

The closest approximation comes from McBeth, around..."


Wow, Eowyn really put it out there - what a move:)
And I absolutely love the phrase "no man of woman born" - especially the way it is used in the book, if you read it you know what I mean, that gave me goosebumps!


message 9: by Pam (new)

Pam | 93 comments Haha. I just started reading the book and literally the author's note begins to explain MacBeth and Tolkein. Thank you for your patience with me as I am redundant.


message 10: by Pam (new)

Pam | 93 comments One doesn't realize how omnipresent their pronouns (and judgements and connotations and etc) are until they are replaced with something else.

A mind simple rolls over these tiny words, unseeing and unnoticedl. But when they are replaced with new neopronouns how much one is halted and stopped by their usage; glaringly obvious and something to be carefully minded.


message 11: by MeerderWörter (new)

MeerderWörter | 120 comments Mod
Pam wrote: "One doesn't realize how omnipresent their pronouns (and judgements and connotations and etc) are until they are replaced with something else.

A mind simple rolls over these tiny words, unseeing a..."


I would say "our" pronouns, just that when the pronoun is in line with what is expected, it doesn't cause much attention.


message 12: by James (new)

James Loftus MeerderWörter wrote: "Hello everyone!

It is a new 2 months, and this means I get to introduce the new book for the next two months:
No Man of Woman Born by Ana Mardoll.

Since our last book was rather heavy, and really..."


I hope no one minds me mentioning the allusion to MacBeth and the connection. A really powerful use of words.


message 13: by Pam (new)

Pam | 93 comments That's great! I highly recommend it


message 14: by Robert (new)

Robert Smart | 38 comments Emma wrote: "It finally came in at my library after being on hold for almost two months! I read it in one sitting :)"

That's awesome Emma! It was a great book.


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