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2nd Round of King Books > Danse Macabre - Book 11

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message 1: by Angie, Constant Reader (new)

Angie | 2543 comments Mod
Discuss book here. Please mark all spoilers for those reading along.


message 2: by Linda (new)

Linda (beaulieulinda117gmailcom) | 965 comments I thought But I was next. At least that's what my check list says.


message 3: by Nancy (new)

Nancy (paper_addict) | 913 comments Linda wrote: "I thought But I was next. At least that's what my check list says."

What is But I?

It should have been Danse Macabre then Roadwork but it got flipped. So now it’s Dance Macabre then it should be Cujo and then The Running Man.

Here is the list of ALL written works in order by year published:

https://www.stephenking.com/library/w...

A lot of short stories are either grouped in a story collection (published in books like Skeleton Crew or Night Shift) or published in an anthology. Some of the short stories in an anthology have been published in a story collection and some haven’t. I don’t think we are including those stories (the ones not included in a King story collection).


message 4: by Robert (new)

Robert Kratky (bolorkay) | 50 comments Was a "revised/updated" edition published around 2010 or 2011?


message 5: by Nancy (new)

Nancy (paper_addict) | 913 comments Robert wrote: "Was a "revised/updated" edition published around 2010 or 2011?"

There was an edition with an extra essay but we have been going by original date published for the reading order (except for shinny new books). Otherwise we wouldn’t have read The Long Walk and Rage until we got to The Backman Books.


message 6: by Nancy (new)

Nancy (paper_addict) | 913 comments No one up for non-fiction? I didn’t read this when it was first published because it was non-fiction. I don’t want to be the only one reading this...

I haven’t started yet, btw.


message 7: by Summer (new)

Summer (paradisecity) | 360 comments I read this a few years ago, but it was published in 1981 and felt pretty dated and pretty dry. It's essentially a list of films and books that I think modern audiences are going to be pretty unfamiliar with, outside true horror fans. And if you're not familiar with the plots of the films/books, his discussions don't really resonate. It's definitely not a book I'd re-read. I'd eat up something similar written in the last few years, though. The genres have changed a lot over the last 40 years.


message 8: by Nick (last edited Dec 10, 2018 10:04PM) (new)

Nick Iuppa | 3975 comments I read it almost two years ago as part of a group read right here. I really liked it. King's recommendations about greatest horror novels were terrific and as a result, I got deep into The Haunting of Hill House. I also thought it was interesting that he felt sorry for poor old Stan Lee because the comic book business wasn't doing well when he wrote the book originally. Man, was he wrong on that one.

Here's my review. https://www.goodreads.com/review/show...


message 9: by Nick (new)

Nick Iuppa | 3975 comments Nancy wrote: "No one up for non-fiction? I didn’t read this when it was first published because it was non-fiction. I don’t want to be the only one reading this...

I haven’t started yet, btw."


I think it's worth a read if you haven't read it. Not sure I'm up for a re-read, but I still remember it and can comment.


message 10: by Kandice (new)

Kandice | 3946 comments I've read it twice and skimmed it lots of times. Yes, it's a bit dated, but I love King's conversational writing so much that I don't mind.


message 11: by Scott (new)

Scott | 107 comments Hi,

I have finished my reading of "Danse Macabre" and posted my review of those who are interested in reading it:

https://www.goodreads.com/review/show...

Thanks, Scott.


message 12: by Nick (new)

Nick Iuppa | 3975 comments Scott wrote: "Hi,

I have finished my reading of "Danse Macabre" and posted my review of those who are interested in reading it:

https://www.goodreads.com/review/show...

Thanks, Scott."


Great comments, Scott. I agree on all fronts, though I did get special insight in reading that King traces most horror back to those 3 victorian novels, Frankenstein, Dr. Jekle and Mr. Hyde and Dracula. Pretty hard to argue with that. Except of course that I would have added the Grimms Brothers. My reading or The Haunting of Hill House is directly attributable to this work by King.


message 13: by Scott (new)

Scott | 107 comments Thanks Nick. I agree with your thoughts on the three Victorian works. I found that very interesting. It's very apparent that King has been teaching this material for a while and knows it well. Also, I have never read Hill House, but i will be now.

Happy Holudays!


message 14: by Kandice (new)

Kandice | 3946 comments Scott wrote: "Thanks Nick. I agree with your thoughts on the three Victorian works. I found that very interesting. It's very apparent that King has been teaching this material for a while and knows it well. Also..."

After you read it, watch the series on Netflix if you have it. It isn't the book, per se, but it perfectly imparts the mood that Jackson created with that book.


message 15: by Scott (new)

Scott | 107 comments I thanks. I will be watching Hill House on Netflix. I appreciate he recommendation.

Happy holidays!


message 16: by Amanda (new)

Amanda Orick (amandaorick) | 7 comments I have no idea why but i just can not get into this book. I keep trying but it just keeps dragging along for me.


message 17: by Scott (last edited Dec 26, 2018 07:18AM) (new)

Scott | 107 comments I could be wrong but I think there may be a couple of reasons why... First, it's non-fiction as opposed to fiction. Second, it's really a study and analysis oriented book as opposed to a creative plot line. Third, since all of the source material is from more than 30 years ago, I think many of the readers who are younger will not relate as well as to the examples. Their memories and references are to books written and movies made following 1980. I don't mean this to sound bias, but I think us older readers who grew up closer to Uncle Stevie's time will connect better to his references and examples because we have similar memories.

Those are just my two-cents, for what it's worth.

Anyway, happy holidays...


message 18: by Kandice (new)

Kandice | 3946 comments Scott wrote: "I could be wrong but I think there may be a couple of reasons why... First, it's non-fiction as opposed to fiction. Second, it's really a study and analysis oriented book as opposed to a creative p..."

I completely agree with you, Scott. Reading this is nostalgic for me.


message 19: by Vernon (new)

Vernon | 21 comments Cujo is one of my favorites.

As I've been working through Stephen King's works chronologically for a long while now, I read Cujo directly after Danse Macabre.

I remember enjoying Cujo more for having read Dans Macabre. For example: In Macabre, King explains how horror writing isn't just being creepy or looking for the scares. It's about catching the reader of guard, dropping the defenses first, then driving the fear home.

So, it was possible then to notice sections in Cujo where King was doing this. I don't remember the details now but I remember being unsettled because of the intimate details and or arguments between a husband and wife.

It also explained the brilliant moments of dark comedy King creates. Humour is an excellent way to knock readers out of the comfort zone.


message 20: by Nick (new)

Nick Iuppa | 3975 comments Vernon wrote: "Cujo is one of my favorites.

As I've been working through Stephen King's works chronologically for a long while now, I read Cujo directly after Danse Macabre.

I remember enjoying Cujo more for ha..."


I'm starting a re-read of Cujo tonight and I'll look for those things. I too really enjoyed dance macabre.


message 21: by Matt (new)

Matt Tandy | 193 comments Finally finished Danse Macabre. I think the SK’s views on horror are still applicable, even if the examples are somewhat dated, though many of them were dated when the book was originally published. His new introduction is extremely interesting, this was my first time reading it. I really do need to watch The Blair Witch Project.


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